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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, APRIL 4, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-Ko. 9 
Price, Ten Cent* 



THEATRE MANAGERS TO 

FIG HT MUS IC LICENSE 

United Protective Association Members Will Not Pay Fee De- 
manded by Composers, Authors and Publishers 
Under Recent Court Ruling 

If plans already 'in motion are carried 
out, there will be a fight to a finish be- 
tween the ' United Managers' Protective 
Association and the American Society of 
Composers, Authors and Publishers, re- 
garding the right of the latter to collect 
a license fee on the music played in the- 
atres, hotels, restaurants, cabarets and 
motion picture theatres. A meeting of 
the Managers' Association will be held 
this week, when definite action, that will 
probably take the form of a blank refusal 
to pay the fee, may be taken. At any 
rate, steps to combat the demands of the 
society will be discussed and outlined for 
immediate action. 

This determination on the part of the 
managers was brought about when the 
composers', authors' and publishers' or- 
ganization made . a demand upon several 
Broadway theatres for the payment of a 
license fee, just as they had done in the 
ease of hotels, restaurants and other 
establishments, under a ruling of the 
United. States Supreme Court handed 
down two months ago. The matter was 
immediately brought to the attention of 
the Managers' Protective Association. An 
investigation was blade by the latter, 
which is said to have disclosed the fact 
that only about 10 per cent, of the music 
upon which a performing right fee was 
being collected -belonged to members of 
the Composers', Authors' and Publishers' 
Society, the balance being the property 
of the Managers' Association members. 

When this became known, a number of 
managers wanted to take immediate steps 
to prevent the other organization from 
continuing their collecting of royalties. 
However, after considerable discussion, it 
was finally decided to have the situation 
further investigated, the result of which 
will be disclosed at the meeting to be held 
Htna-'. 

It is contended by the managers that 
the greater part of the musk performed 
in cabarets, theatres, hotels, etc., belongs 
to them because it was part of produc- 
tions which' they control and for which 
they hold the producing and per forming 
rights. These, they maintain, have never 
been surrendered and, therefore, cannot 
be made the basis for the collection of a 
license fee on the part of anyone without 
their sanction. 

At the 'meeting to be held this week 
plans for asserting this fact will be out- 
lined. The license fee demands will prob- 
ably be refused, and it will then be up 
to the composers, authors and publishers 
to prove their rights to the fee which, the 
managers maintain, they cannot do. 

If this contention is right, many persons 
believe that the composers, authors and 
publishers will not make a fight' on the 
issue for fear that the managers may 
adopt measures by which it would be un- 
necessary for hotels, cabarets, etc, to pay 
any license at all. This could be brought 
about, it is pointed out, by the managers 
granting performing rights for music 
which they control,, to hotels, cabarets, 
etc., in which case the latter could then 



dispense with the playing of music and 
selections or other material over which 
members of the Composers', Authors' and 
Publishers' Association do have control. 

It is even said that the managers have 
already arranged for a meeting with a 
committee from the Hotel Men's Associa- 
tion at which they will offer the latter the 
use of music and numbers from produc- 
tions for one year, without the payment 
of a fee, provided, that the hotel men 
will, in the event of the American Society 
bringing action to collect a license fee, 
help combat their claims. It is intimated 
that this proposition is entirely satisfac- 
tory to the hotel men and that, if the 
managers should offer it, it would be 
quickly accepted. 

At the time that the United States Su- 
preme Court handed down its decision in 
this regard there was much glee mani- 
fested by the members of the Composers', 
Authors' and Publishers' Society. As 
long as the court had held that all estab- 
lishments were giving these performances 
for profit the members of the society fig- 
ured that this would be their opportunity 
of reaping a harvest, especially as they 
had fought the issue in the courts for 
several years. 

Plans were then formulated for en- 
forcing the collection of the fee. Com- 
mittee conferences were held almost daily 
for more than a month, during which time 
the entire plan of campaign was mapped 
out. It was first decided that the New 
York territory would be the proper one in 
which to begin action. Notices were sent 
to theatres, hotels, restaurants, cabarets 
and other establishments, informing them 
of the court decision and stating' that a 
license fee ranging from $5 to $15 a 
month, according to the type and kind 
of performance given, would be charged. 
Meetings were held with the members of 
the Hotel Men's Association, and it is 
said that the latter body assured the so- 
ciety that all of . their members would 
pay the fee asked of them. 

It was then quickly figured out by the 
members of the society that as soon as 
their plan became operative' the returns 
would exceed $600,000 a year. They 
made arrangements to apportion the 
United States into districts and establish 
offices in each for the collection of the 
levy. These offices, outside of the local 
one, which is running at present, were to 
be established in the larger cities of the 
East and Middle West during the next 
few months. 

It is possible that if the managers can 
uphold their contention regarding the is- 
sue that they will establish a collection 
bureau for the purpose of obtaining a 
license fee from those places that use 
their material. 

There is little possibility, it was learned, 
of the managers getting together with the 
composers, authors and publishers for a 
mutual plan of co-operation in the col- 
lection of fees, as the managers seem to 
be greatly. incensed at the actions of the 
society. 



ROCK AND WHITE QUARREL 

Frances White, of Rock and White, is 
resting at Lakewood, N. J., recuperating 
from a nervous breakdown which, it is re- 
ported, she suffered after having had 
several quarrels with Rock, while playing 
at the Colonial last week It is said the 
trouble started over Miss White's forth- 
coming marriage and that on Friday night 
the dispute became so intense that it be- 
came necessary to call a physician to at- 
tend Miss White before she could appear. 
The physician advised that she be removed 
to her home, and, consequently, she did not 
appear with Rock in "The Midnight 
Frolic" that evening. The physician was 
in attendance on Miss White during the 
balance of the week at the Colonial and 
also at the Roof where she appeared 
Saturday evening. 

The pair have signed a contract with 
Raymond Hitchcock to appear in his Eng- 
lish Revue, "Some," next season. They 
are to appear in this show ten weeks, dur- 
ing which period they will also appear at 
the "Midnight Frolic," having signed an- 
other contract with Ziegfeld. According to 
other rumors it is quite possible that Miss 
White will be married to Frankle Fay, 
the vaudevillion, during her stay in Lake- 
wood. 



LUBOWSKA SUED FOR $300 

Lubowska, the danseuse, has been sued 
by Edward D. Kurylo, ballet master of 
the Russian Imperial Dancing School, for 
$300 for breach of contract. Kurylo 
claims that he was engaged to prepare an 
act featuring Lubowska which she was to 
use on a South American tour and that 
after be had performed his part of the bar- 
gain, Lubowska refused to pay him for. his 
services. Suit has been brought through 
Harry Saks Hechheimer, his attorney. 



THEATRICAL LAWYERS ROBBED 

O'Brien, Malevinsky and Driscoll, the 
theatrical lawyers, are anxiously seeking 
a former employee who left them uncere- 
moniously recently taking with him a 
considerable amount of money belonging 
to the firm. Just how much this amount 
was is not ascertainable, but Driscoll ad- 
mits that the sum is sufficient to make it 
worth while to locate him. 



DANCER CHARGED WITH BIGAMY 

Charged with being married twice with- 
out having been divorced, MB— Van 
Court Durand, a dancer, was arrested 
Monday for bigamy and held for trial in 
$1,000 bail. King Terrell, of the Twelfth 
New York Infantry, and Nahlon McKay, 
a book-keeper, were named in court as her 
two "husbands." 



LILLIAN STEELE GETS DIVORCE 

PmT.Anrr.FHXa, March 31. — In Common 
Pleas Court No. 4 last Monday, Lillian 
Steele was granted an absolute divorce from 
Jas. ■ P. Cbnlin, formerly of the Conlin. 
Steele and Carr act. 



"80011" GOES INTO ELTTNGE 
"Birth" a motion picture produced by 
the Eugenic Producing Company wOl have 
its initial . presentation in the Eltinge 
Theatre, next Sunday afternoon. This is 
the first motion picture to he presented 
in this theatre. 



PORCASI SUED FOR DIVORCE 

San Francisco. March 30. — Peter Paul 
Poreasi, former-) Heading man in "Twin 
Beds," is being sued by his' wife, Mrs. 
Phyllis Seymour Poreasi, for divorce. 



MAX HART IS 

SUED BY 

WIFE 

ASKS $20,000 AND PROPERTY 

Through the service of the summons and 
complaint last week in a Supreme Court 
action, brought by Mrs. Madge Hart, pro- 
fessionally known as Madge Fux, against 
Max Hart, her husband, and a vaudeville 
booking agent, it became known that in 
papers filed in the County Clerks office, 
Mrs. Hart asks for a judgment of (20,- 
000 and a division of all of Harfs prop- 
erty, real estate, bonds and mortgages in 
addition to an allowance of $75 a week 

In the complaint filed by Hirschman ft 
Drucker, attorneys for Mrs. Hart, it is 
alleged that the suit is the outcome of 
many turbulent periods during their mar- 
ried life. 

She alleges that, after her marriage 
fourteen years ago, she gave Hart the 
money with which to operate a theatrical 
booking agency and that she also taught 
him the business. At that time, it is 
stated, an agreement was made between 
the couple whereby Hit was to share 
with his wife the Incosu derived from the 
business and any property he might ac- 
quire. 

It is alleged, according to the papers, 
that their married life was happy until the 
fall of 1015, when differences arose. 
These differences were settled early in 
1016 and the ~*uple went to live together 
again, remaining together until August, 
1016, when Hart suddenly left his wife at 
their borne in Freeport, L. I., she says. 

During that period it is alleged Mrs. 
Hart commenced an action against Hart 
in the Supreme Court for an accounting 
of bis property and asking for the ap- 
pointment of a receiver in order that her 
share might be determined. 

At the time of the reconciliation. Hart 
is alleged to have persuaded Mrs. Hart to 
withdraw this suit and another one pend- 
ing against him, he agreeing if she did 
so, to give her $20,000 outright, and trans- 
fer one-half interest in bis business, real 
estate and persons! property to her. 

In addition, she says, he promised to 
allow her $75 a week "pin" money, which 
she could collect from Felber A Shea, the 
same being part of bis Income from thea- 
tres in which he was interested with that 
firm. Mrs. Hart alleges that, at the time, 
he gave her a certificate of deposit on the 
Chatham A Phoenix National Bank for 
$20,000 and also the order on the thea- 
trical concern for the money. 

According to the complaint, Mrs. Hart 
returned the certificate of deposit to Hart 
for the purpose of allowing him to pro- 
cure the cash for her. This money. It is 
alleged, has- not been paid over to her. 
Neither has 1 he transferred one-half of the ' 
property, she says. 

About a -month ago, the Harts were 
again In the courts, when Mrs.' Hart pro- 
cured a summons from Magistrate Simma 
in the West Side Court, alleging that her 
husband bad chopped down the door to 
their apartment when she had barred It 
against his entrance. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



BELASCO SAYS 

DISPUTED PLAY 

ISjflS 

STATES MACK IS NOT AUTHOR 



When Ex-Judge E. Henry Uieombe, who 
was appointed referee by Justice Pendle- 
ton on Monday, begins hearings in the 
action brought by A. U. Woods against 
David Belasco, testimony of considerable 
interest to theatrical people will be of- 
fered. 

In this action which Woods has brought 
to restrain Belasco from producing a play 
of the Canadian Northwest, which, it is 
alleged Willard Mack wrote, Marjorie 
Rambeau, an actress appearing in "Cheat- 
ing Cheaters," who, in private life is Mrs. 
Willard Mack, submitted an affidavit al- 
leging that her husband had written the 
play. Woods contends that he has a five- 
year contract for all of Mack's products, 
and that it has not expired. 

Belasco, in an affidavit submitted, states 
that he wan responsible for the theme and 
plot of the play, and that Mack only as- 
sisted him in writing minor details of 
characters and scenes, as he was familiar 
with that section of the country and its 
people. He states that no one but him has 
any right to the play, but that Mack 
might probably be engaged to act in the 
production. 

In her affidavit, Miss Rambeau allege? 
that Belasco called upon her at her home 
a month ago and during a conversation in 
which he offered her a leading part in a 
production informed her that Mack had 
written a wonderful play of the Canadian 
Northwest which he was going to produce 
shortly. 

Belasco, in a replying affidavit, denied 
that he had made any mention of Mack 
having written the play, stating that the 
sole topic of his conversation was with 
reference to engaging Miss Rambeau for 
one of his productions. 

The motion before Justice Pendleton for 
a temporary injunction, restraining Be- 
lasco from producing the play, was sus- 
pended. It is expected that Judge La- 
combe will finish the taking of testimony 
within two weeks and will then submit his 
findings to Justice Pendleton for a final 
decision. 

In the meantime the production of the 
play will be held in abeyance. 

BARCLAY IN VAUDEVILLE 

Don Barclay, who closed his engage- 
ment with the "Follies," in Baltimore last 
Saturday, is rehearsing a new act, which 
will have its initial performance at Fox's 
Jamaica Theatre next Monday. Irving 
O. Hay of "The Globe Trotters" and 
George MilaBh will appear in the act 
with Barclay. After the Jamaica appear- 
ance, the act will be booked in the two- 
a-day theatres until Barclay opens with 
the new Follies. 



1 OEW GIVES GRANLUND CAR 

N. T. Granlund, general publicity di- 
rector of the Loew Circuit, was the re- 
cipient last week of a 1017 coupe model 
Overland car. the gift of Marcus Loew. 
Granlund will use the car in traveling to 
and from the various Loew theatres. 
This is the second car that Loew has 
presented to Granlund. 

ZUKOR GIVEN DINNER 

PHTT.Arin.PHiA, April 2. — A dinner was 
tendered Adolph Zukor by J. J. McCarthy 
and J. S. McSween, of the Chestnut Street 
Opera House, at the L'Aiglon Cafe this 
evening. A host of local newspaper men 
were present as well as Jesse Leaky, John 
O. Flinn, Wells Hawks and Theodore 
Mitchell, who accompanied Mr. Zukor here 
from New York. 



MAY BURNS CRITICALLY ILL 

May Burns (Mrs. Jack Sutter) Is at 
the Cumberland Street Hospital. Brook- 
lyn, in a critical condition, after a serious 
operation. 



PLAY INJUNCTION VACATED 

The temporary injunction restraining 
Commissioner of Licenses George H. Bell 
from interfering with the performance of, 
"The Awakening of Spring," which was 
procured by the Sociological Fund of the 
Medical Review of Reviews was vacated 
by Justice Erlanger in the Supreme Court 
on Monday. Application for an adjourn 
ment of the case was made by the at- 
torney for the society and Justice Er- 
langer pot the matter down for hearing 
tomorrow. The Shnberts' who control the 
theatre in which the play was presented 
issued a statement that no further per- 
formances of this play would be allowed 
in any of their houses. 



TO ADVANCE RAIL RATES 

Advices reached New York last week that 
the Southern railroads are preparing to 
advance party rates for the theatrical pro- 
fession from two cents per mile per per- 
son to two add a quarter cents, following 
the action of some of the Northern roads. 
With this end in view the heads of the 
companies have petitioned the State Cor- 
poration Commission of Virginia for per- 
mission to advance the rates one quarter of 
a cent. The hearing on the petition takes 
place this week at Richmond, Va. 



MANAGER IS CONVICTED 

Bob-ton, March 29. — After a deliberation 
of nearly twenty-four hours a jury today 
convicted Harry Green and disagreed in 
the case of Oscar Green, charged jointly 
with having set Ore to a building in East 
Boston for a bribe of $300. Oscar Green 
produced witnesses to show that, as man- 
ager of a theatrical company, he was direct- 
ing performances at Portland, Me., and 
Worcester, Mass., at the time Blum con- 
fessed to having paid the Greens the money. 



NEW HOUSE FOR TERRE HAUTE 

Tebre Haute, Ind., March 31. — Plans to 
build a new moving picture theatre on the 
site of the old Varieties Theatre, have been 
formed by the managers of the Bankers 
and Merchants Theatre Co., lessees of the 
site, and work on the house will begin 
about April 20. 



CHANNING ELLERY DEAD 

Chinning EUery, the bandmaster, died 
at the Brooklyn Hospital, Friday, In hit 
sixtieth year. When the Banda Rosso 
failed, EUery reorganized it under his own 
name and made a successful tonr with it 
nil over this country and abroad. 



WHITE RATS LOSE SUIT 

A weekly theatrical paper has been 
awarded a verdict of $500 in the Third 
District Municipal Court on a suit brought 
over an advertising contract The period- 
ical was represented by the law firm of 
O'Brien. Malevinsky and DriseoU. 



ORDYNSKI AFTER POWERS 

Richard Ordynski and Joseph Urban 
are trying to persuade .Tames T. Powers 
to star in one of their French productions 
at the Bandbox Theatre. The one they 
have in mind for him is Moliere's comedy, 
"Le Bourgeoise Gentilhomme." 

SINGER SUES FOR $50,000 
Carolina White, the grand opera singer, 
last Friday brought salt in the Supreme 
Court of New York against Robert E. 
Johnston, her manager, for $50,000 dam- 
ages for alleged breach of contract. 



MARCUS LOEW ON VACATION 

Marcus Loew, head of the Loew Cir- 
cuit, accompanied by Mrs. Loew, left last 
Thursday night for French Lick Springs, 
Ind., where he will remain for a two- 
week vacation. 



ST. LOUIS HOUSE FOR PANT AGES 
St, Lotas, April 2, — Alex Fantages has 
announced that be will erect a theatre here, 
to be added to his regular circuit of vaude- 
ville houses. 



HOPPER FOR "PASSING SHOW" 
De Wolf Hopper has been engaged for 
the leading role of the next Winter Gar- 
den "Passing Show." 



MUST STAMP 

PRICE ON 

TICKETS 



LAW EFFECTIVE MAY 1ST 

Commissioner of Licenses George H. 
Bell, in accordance with the authority in- 
vested in him by. the Charter of his office 
served notice upon the theatre managers 
last Saturday, that on and after May 1, 
every theatre ticket must bear on ita face, 
in plain type, the full box-office price. 
To discuss this matter Commissioner Bell 
held a conference with the United Mana- 
gers Protective Association yesterday. 

During the conference, Commissioner 
Bell stated that one of the primary rea- 
sons for issuing this order was the fact 
that there is a sliding scale of prices ex- 
isting at various theatres. He stated that 
he had called a certain theatre on the 
phone and reserved two seats for a per- 
formance at a given price. When he "ar- 
rived to ask for his tickets he was charged 
considerable in excess of that amount at 
the box-office. He declared that it was 
embarrassing to theatre-goers to come to 
a theatre and not know of the price of 
tickets until passing their money into the 
box-office. 

In the order issued by the Commis- 
sioner, it explicitly states that every 
ticket must nave printed in bold-faced 
type, not less than one-fourth inch high, 
on the face of that part retained by the 
purchaser, after admission to the theatre, 
the box-office price of the ticket. 

His order also specifies that there must 
be prominently displayed in the lobby of 
every theatre the price of all classes of 
tickets for every performance. The price 
so displayed must be identical with the 
prices printed on the corresponding 
tickets. 

A violation of these conditions will re- 
sult in the immediate revocation of the 
license of the theatre in which it takes 
place. 

At the time that Commissioner Bell's 
office was created, he was given arbitrary 
power to take action of this sort if he 
deemed it necessary. It is expected that 
the enforcement of this ruling will be the 
stepping stone toward a . move to con- 
ceive a method of eliminating the ticket 
speculators and brokers. 



GRAY MANAGES NEW MILLER 

Milwaukee, Wis., April 1. — T. M. Gray, 
who managed the Crystal Theatre, will 
hold the reins of the new Miller Theatre, 
this city, when it opens April 5. Harvey 
De Vora Trio and the Creiphton Sisters. 
who were at the Rialto. Chicago, last 
week, will be on the opening bill. 

GRAUMAN BUYS FRISCO THEATRE 

San Francisco, March 31. — Sid Grau- 
man has purchased his father's interest in 
the Strand Theatre, formerly the Empress, 
and is now the sole owner. The house 
opened Sunday ns a moving picture the- 
atre with Mary Pickford in "The Poor 
Little Rich Girl." 



TREE COMPLETES TOUR 

Montreal Can., March 31. — Sir Her- 
bert Tree completed his tour in "Henry 
VHP' here tonight and will return to New 
York for final rehearsals of "Colonel New- 
come," which he win present at the New 
Amsterdam Theatre beginning April 10. 
-^ 

ORR TO HAVE NEW SHOW 

Harvey D. Orr is to have a new show 
next season, in which he and Harold Orr 
will be featured. It "will play mostly 
through- the Eastern territory. 



JOHN BARRYMORE ENGAGED 

John Barrymore has been engaged by 
Lee Shubert for the leading role In "Peter 
Ibbetson," which is coming to the Republic 
Theatre April 16. Lionel Barrymore will 
also be in the cast. 



"THE PAWN" OPENS 

Stamford, Conn., March 3L— "The 
Pawn," by Joseph Noel and Arelle M. 
Aldrich, received its first presentation at 
the Stamford Theatre last evening under 
the direction of Frank Eeenan, who staged 
the production:' The play deals with the 
Japanese spy system in this country. • The 
cast includes John Saintpolis, James Crane, 
William David, Joseph Selman, Nathaniel 
Sack, Desmond Gallagher, Florence Martin, 
Alice Fleming, lone Magrane, Nesta de 
Becker and T. Yamada. 



"KNIFE" TO OPEN BIJOU THEATRE 
The production chosen by the Messrs. 
Shubert for the opening of the new Bijou 
Theatre April 12 is Eugene Walter's lat- 
est play, "The Knife," a drama in three 
acts and four scenes, which has been pro- 
duced out of town. The cast includes: 
Robert Edeson, Lowell Sherman, Olive 
Wyndham, Beatrice Beckley (Mrs. James 
K. Hackett), Caroline Newcombe, W. A. 
Norton, Gorden Burby, Myrtle Anderson, 
Cyrus Wood and Ivy Benton. 

"LITTLE MISSUS" TO OPEN 

"The Little Missus" will receive its 
premiere at the Apollo Theatre, Atlantic 
City, on April 19. The book is by A. E. 
Thomas and the score by Paul Eisler. 
Christie MacDonald is being featured, sup- 
ported by Roy Atwell, Frank Bradley, 
Isabel Vernon, Sylvia Thorne, Alice Hill, 
Pauline French and Edwin Wilson. 



PHILA. THEATRE PATRIOTIC 

Philadelphia, April 2. — The lobby «»r 
the Palace Theatre baa been decorated by 
a new electric sign, the lights of which are 
in red, white and bine. Other decorations 
consist of the American flag, the city flag 
and emblems of the Army and. Navy. 



LARGEST FRISCO HOUSE OPENING 

San Francisco, March 3L — The new 
playhouse, the Casino, is announced to 
open Easter Sunday, April 8, with eight 
vaudeville acts, a five-reel photoplay and 
other pictures. This is the largest house 
devoted to amusements ever built in this 
city. 



WHITE LEAVES ST. PAUL HOUSE 

St. Paul, Minn., March 31.— Beverly 
White, formerly press agent for the Or- 
pheum Theatre here, has been succeeded 
by Arvid A. Ericsson, a St. Paul news- 
paper man. White is now with the Sells 
Floto Circus. 



GRIFFITH IN LONDON 

London, England, March 3L — D. W. 
Griffith has arrived and will shortly go to 
the battle front in France. "Intolerance." 
his film spectacle, will have Its first Lon- 
don presentation week after next at Drnry 
Lane. 



GOLDEN WEDDING FOR SMITHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Smith, parents 
of Will Archie, the well known lillipu- 
tian, celebrated their golden wedding an- 
niversary last Thursday night at their 
home on West Twenty-eighth street. 



ALLEN'S DOGS FOR MOVIES 

San Fbancisco, Cal., April 2. — Scotty 
Allen's prize winning dog team, which has 
been exhibiting here since arriving from 
Alaska, was shipped to Los Angeles on the 
steamer Governor to be nsed In the movies. 



WILLIAMS GETS NEW PLAY 

"Love in a Cottage," a new comedy by 
W. Somerset Maugham, has been accepted 
by John D. Williams for production next 
fall. 



"GRASSHOPPER" COMING APRIL 9 

"The Grasshopper," a play of Irish, 
peasant life, staged by B. Iden Payne, is 
to be presented April in New York. 

ONTARIO MANAGER IN TOWN 

T. W. Logan, manager of the Majestic 
Theatre of London, Ontario, is in town. 

LADELLA TROUPE AT HIP. 

The Ladella acrobatic troupe have joined 
the Hippodrome ahow. 



April 4, 191f 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



BIG SHOW HAS 

LONG LIST OF 

FEATURES 



DRAWS BIG CROWD TO GARDEN 



That Spring is here, in spite of what the 
weather man may say, was proved last 
Thursday afternoon, when the Barnum & 
Bailey Greatest Show on Earth began its 
annual engagement at Madison Square 
Garden before one of the biggest gatherings 
ever seen at an opening performance of the 
show. 

The pageant this season takes the shape 
of a spectacle, the idea for which was 
taken from the story of "Aladdin and His 
Wonderful Lamp." It is one of the most 
brilliantly gorgeous pageants seen. The 
bespangled costumes of men and women, 
made in Chinese colors and fashions, and 
the rich robes covering the animals, were 
all in keeping with the well-known story 
of Aladdin and produced an odd but rarely 
beautiful color effect. 

Of the many features presented on the 
bill, that which held down first place with 
the spectators was the aerial gymnastic 
work of Miss Leltzel. The program calls 
her "queen of the air," an appellation that 
seems entirely fitting, for the country has 
never seen a more perfect woman gym- 
nast. She begins her work by climbing np 
a rope doing Spanish web work while mak- 
ing the ascent. About forty feet in the 
air ia a trapeze and on this she does some 
of the best aerial work ever seen here. She 
works with grace and dexterity, and an 
amazing rapidity. Miss Leitzel is petite, 
but Khe is a little bunch of Btrength and 
agility and the storm of applause that was 
given her at the finish was a lust tribute 
to hei' ability. 

Among the animal acts which stood out 
prominently must be mentioned Lady Alice 
Pets, which included trained cats and rats. 
To see these natural enemies performing as 
one happy family is to know that animal 
training has indeed reached an almost im- 
possible state of perfection. 

Ena CI a r en, who ia known in Europe as 
the perfect Venus, is the star of "The Act 
Beaut if ul." one of the big features of the 
bill. 

The Silbon Sisters, members of the 
famous Silbon Family, do an aerial act that 
Is dainty bnt daring, and pats to the test 
all of their well known gymnastic ability. 

Lupeta Perea is known as one of the 
most daring of all trapeze artists and with 
this show she lives np to her reputation. 
She does many hazardous feats and her 
finish, in which she performs a whirlwind 
stunt, is thrilling. 

The Arleys, in their high perch act, do 
sensational work. ' The man at the top of 
the slendor pole works with such ease and 
confidence that much of the apparent danger 
of the act is dispelled. 

The Van and Belle Troupe are expert 
missile throwers. They throw wood missile 
in the same manner aa the boomerang is 
thrown and the way these objects return to 
them is little short of marvelous. 

Bird Millman has long been termed the 
"Queen of the Wire" and she surely lives 
up to that name for such reckless abandon 
as she displays on the wire has never been 
attempted by any of her sister performers. 

The Belford Troupe of Acrobats take 
high rank in their line. They do the usual 
stunts in this line of work, but specialize 
in risky work in which they are past 
masters. 

H. L. King is again bandmaster with 
the show and his band is a feature playing 
with unusual smoothness. 

Alvin Green, who is considered one of 
America's best Rubes, is one' of the big 
laugh getters with the show this season. 

Herman Poline, the original musical cir- 
cus clown, does a first class act. He is 
one of our leading fun makers and is a 
leader in his class. 



SUNDAY CONTRACT IS VALID 
A theatrical contract made on Sunday is 
valid and binding, according to a decision 
handed down last week by Judge Murray 
of the Third District Municipal Court in 
the case of Michael W. Ring, a producer, 
against Hugo Bmmlik, director of amuse- 
ments of the Hotel Morrison, Chicago. The 
Court decided that $450 waa due Ring on 
a breach of contract, Ring having made all 
arrangements to put on a show at the hotel 
and Brnmllk failing to keep his side of the 
agreement When the defense was pot np 
that the contract was invalid because it 
was made on Sunday, Judge Murray held 
that the Sunday rule should not apply to 
theatrical agreements because many man- 
agers make their performers work on Sun- 
day and must therefore be willing to 
recognize it as a day upon which business 
can be legally transacted. Henry Saks 
Hechheimer acted as attorney for Ring. 



FAULHABER BEATS RATS TWICE 
John M. Faulhaber, house manager of 
the National Vaudeville Artists, Inc., is 
the victor in two law suits, in which he and 
the White Rats were the parties con- 
cerned. Faulhaber, who was formerly 
house manager of the Rats, was sued by 
the organization in the Third Municipal 
District Court for $40, which the Rats al- 
leged was due them for two weeks' room 
rent. Faulhaber, in turn, sued the Rata 
for $80 unpaid salary. The court decided 
both cases in favor of Faulhaber. 



NEW FOLLIES JUNE 4TH 

Ziegfeld's "1917 Follies" will have its 
New York premiere at the New Amster- 
dam Theatre on Monday evening, June 4. 
The show will, prior to coming into New 
York, play at Atlantic City on Decoration 
Day. Despite the fact that Eddie Can- 
tor, the black-face comedian, has been 
signed with tbe show, Bert Williams will 
also be in the cast. It was learned that 
only about a dozen of the girls from this 
season's show will be in the new Follies. 



SAVOY, FALL RIVER, CLOSED 

Faix RrvxB, Mass., March 31. — The Sa- 
voy Theatre closed last Saturday night 
and will remain closed for some weeks. 
George Parisian, representative of the pres- 
ent owners said that extensive repairs will 
be made to the house. 



"LOVE SQUEEZE" OPENS APRIL 7 
"The Love Squeeze," Charles Dickson's 
new play will be given its first presenta- 
tion next Saturday at Allentown, Pa., with 
Mr. Dickson as the star and under the 
management of Ed. Rosenbsum. Jr. 



GIBSON UNDERGOES OPERATION 

Preston Gibson, the playwright, had to 
undergo a painful operation on his right ear 
early Sunday morning as the result of an 
injury received when boxing a few hours 
before. It is not believed that the injury 
will affect his hearing. 



BOOKING AGENT MARRIED 

Mary Thompson, former wife of J. 
Parker Coombs, baritone at the New^York 
Hippodrome, is now the bride of William 
C- Green, proprietor of the Pine Tree 
Amusement Enterprises, a booking agency 
of. Chicago. 

PARTY FOR "PAWN" PREMIERE 

Lyle D. Andrews, Harry Steinfeld and 
Joseph Moran, made up an automobile 
party Friday and motored to Stamford to 
help Frank Keenan put over the first per- 
formance of "The. Pawn." 



OPERA PLAYERS OPEN IN MAY 

Hartford, Conn., April 1. — Mabel Wil- 
bur and Frank Cote wffl sing the leading 
roles in the opening musical bill of the 
Opera Players, beginning May 7, at Par- 
sons' Theatre. 



RATS PICKETING 

THREE MORE 

HOUSES 



NO OTHER DEVELOPMENTS 



Outside of the placing of pickets at three 
additional houses on the Loew Circuit in 
Greater New York, there was but little de- 
velopment in the White Rata situation dur- 
ing the past week. There was little activity 
about the club house and all seemed to be 
contented with conditions, especially as to 
the picketing of the Loew theatres. 

On Friday pickets were placed at the 
National and Boulevard theatres in the 
Bronx, in addition to the Belancey Street 
and Avenue B in Manhattan and the- 
Palace in Brooklyn. Monday, pickets were 
placed at tbe Bijou in Brooklyn. 

To combat the work of the pickets N. T. 
Granlund, purveyor of publicity of the 
Loew Circuit ia visiting the neighborhood 
of the theatres affected and addressing the 
people regarding tbe trouble. On Monday 
afternoon he appeared at tbe Royal The- 
atre in the Bronx, which is located op- 
posite the National Theatre and addressed 
the audience from the stage regarding the 
situation. 

On Sunday there was the usual exodus 
of acts from the Grand Central and Penn- 
sylvania terminals. The agents from the 
various offices were on band but none of 
the White Rata contingent appeared. 

Harry Mountford has been in New York 
most of the past week utilizing his time in 
addressing various labor organizations and 
asking for their co-operation. W. J. 
Fitzpatriok, International president of the 
organization has been dividing his time 
between New York and Boston. 

It was said Monday that there were a 
great number of resignations from the 
White Rats during tbe past week and that 
the levy tribute was not up to tbe expecta- 
tions of the heads of the organization. 



-FOLLIES" GETS ALLYN KING 

Allyn King has signed to appear in 
Ziegfeld's Tollies of 1917." The show 
will go into rehearsal week after next. 



WHITE RATS APPEAL 

TO BOSTON LABOR 

BOSTON, Mass., April 2. — Leaders in 
charge of tbe strike of the White Rats 
Actors' Union here have appealed to mem- 
bers of organized labor in this section 
through the Central body to assist them in 
protecting the women on the picket linen. 

According to the charges, aired before 
the Boston Central Labor Union on Sun- 
day by Geoffrey Whalen, deputy organizer 
for the striking actors in this section, one 
girl picket waa punched in the stomach one 
night last week in front of one of the 
houses and bad to be escorted to the office 
of a nearby physician for treatment. 

In declaring that the organization of the 
White Rata Actors' Union is now endeavor- 
ing to obtain the evidence necessary pre- 
paratory to prosecuting the persons res- 
ponsible for the alleged attacks. Organizer 
Whalen requested each and every union 
man and woman in this city to keep their 
eyes open In the neighborhood of the houses 
involved, especially at night, in order that 
their women on the picket lines may be 
assured of more adequate protection. 

With the exception of an appeal to mem- 
bers of organized labor to assist them in 
making their present picket lines "more 
militant" and urging them to purchase 
tickets for a benefit entertainment to be 
held in Wells Memorial Hall Thursday 
night to raise funds for the strikers, there 
is very little material change in tbe strike 
situation here. 

No attempt was made to extend the strike 
or the picket lines, although the pickets are 
active day and night in front of the eight 
local houses concerned. Outwardly nothing 
has occu r red that would indicate any im- 
mediate sympathetic action by the other 
theatrical unions of the men still engaged 
in the "unfair to labor theatres." 



TO FIGHT ELECTRICIAN BILL 

Considerable opposition will be offered 
against the bill Introduced by Assembly- 
man Taylor in the Legislature last week 
changing the general business law provid- 
ing for the licensing of electricians in the 
State. Theatrical managers and the 
United Managers' Protective Association 
have already declared themselves against 
the measure. They claim that if this law 
were passed it would be necessary for 
each traveling show to hire a. licensed 
electrician, under whose supervision the 
show electrician could handle his appa- 
ratus. This licensed electrician would be 
in addition to the one being carried by 
the house and would add an expense of 
$36 a week to the working crew salary 
of the shows. 



GRIPPE KEEPS BERNHARDT IDLE 
Sarah Bernhardt 's plans for the lmmi-di- 
ate future are rather uncertain, depend- 
ing upon her ability to recuperate from a 
long-standing case of grippe. Her illness 
became so acute recently that she was 
forced to cancel her vaudeville engage- 
ments and retire with her suite to 
Charleston, S. C, for a much needed rest. 
It is said that the temporary abandon- 
ment of her vaudeville tour necessitated 
the return of more than $6,000 to ticket 
purchasers in New England cities. It is 
possible that she will resume her vaude- 
will tour in a couple of weeks. 



VERDICT AGAINST FROHMAN 

Mrs. E. Livingston Hunt, wife of Dr. B. 
L. Hunt, a New York phyalciao, obtained 
a verdict of $500 damages from a jury in 
tbe Supreme Court last week, in a suit 
which she brought against Cbas. Frohman, 
Inc., for breach of contract because of dis- 
courteous treatment on the part of a box- 
office employee. The said breach took place 
a year ago when Mrs. Hunt attended a per- 
formance at the' Lyceum Theatre when it 
was alleged she was insulted by a box- 
office employee. The court held that when 
she purchased a ticket from tbe theatre, the 
house contracted to treat her civilly. 



COMPOSER'S WIFE LOSES JEWELS 

Chicago, 111., April 3.— Jewelry, amount- 
ing in value to $75,000, bos been seised by 
government officials from Mrs. Joseph 
Jordan, wife of a song composer. They 
consist of 1,000 diamonds which Mrs. Jor- 
dan brought to the United Statu from 
England without payment of duty. Claim- 
ing that she ia an English subject and that 
she did not intend to sell the stones, her 
act may not be construed as smuggling, in 
which case the jewelry will be returned to 
her. 



EDWARD ELLIS TO MARRY 

Edward Ellis, an actor and prominent 
member of the Lambs club has announced 
his engagement to marry Josephine 
Stevens, a motion picture actress, and 
daughter of the late Ben Stevens, who 
was Klaw & Erlanger'a general represen- 
tative. The marriage will take place at 
the completion of, 'The Butcher Boy," a 
"Patty" Arhuekle picture in which Miss 
Stevens is appearing as leading woman. 



GEORGE HEN5CHEL BACK 

George Henscbel returned to New York 
Monday after a tour of twenty weeks as 
business manager of "Flora Bella." After 
a short vacation he will again assume his 
post as publicity purveyor at Schenck 
Bros., Palisade Park, which opens early 
in May. 

MAURICE GOODMAN ENGAGED 

Maurice Goodman, general counsel for 
the B. F. Keith Vaudeville Circuit and 
the United Booking Offices, is engaged to 
marry Pauline B. Hoffman, according to 
an announcement made last week by the 
parents of the young lady. 



BISHOP TO STAGE PRODUCTION 

Fred Bishop will stage the production 
of "When Johnny Comes Marching 
Home" which Fred C. Whitney b going 
to revive. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER April 4, 1917 



The Phenomenal Soprano-Barytone 

Claire Rochester 

TOURING WITH M ME. SARAH BERNHARDT 

DIRECTION OF WM. F. CONNOR ===== 



At B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE this week, APRIL 2 

WM. B. FRIEDLANDER, Inc., Presents 

GEORGE W. JINKS 

FEATURED IN "THE FOUR HUSBANDS" 
Next week at B. F. KEITH'S RIVERSIDE THEATRE 



BOOKED ON THE ORPHEUM CIRCUIT, SEASON 1917-1918 

NIP AND TUCK 

OFFERING 

"TALK AND ACTION" 

DIRECTION — Gene Hughes, Inc., and Jo Paige Smith. . 



HELLO, CHICAGO! AL LEYTON Is In Your City With All The Latest 
GEORGE M. COHAN, WILLIAM JEROME and HARRY TIERNEY Song Hits 

"There's Only One Little Girl" "Some Time" 

"M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I" and 
"Come on Over Here It's a Wonderful Place" 



Suite 55 Ceo. M. Cohan's Grand Opera House Bldg., Chicago 

New York Office: Wm. Jerome Publishing Corp., Strand Theatre Bldg., Broadway and 47th Street 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



VMCJ 




THREE ORPHEUM HOUSES 
TO RUN AL L SUMMER 

All Other Theatres on Circuit Close in April or May. Colonial 

and Alhambra to Close in New York, While Summer 

Policy of Riverside Is Undecided 



All theatres on the Orpheum Circuit 
will close for the summer season except 
the Chicago Majestic, San Francisco Or- 
pheum and Los Angeles Orpheum. The 
first one to become temporarily dark will 
be the one in Duluth, which will complete 
its present season with the week of 
April 21. 

The final weeks at the other houses will 
be: Memphis, week of April 30; New Or- 
leans, May 0; Winnipeg, April 22; Cal- 
gary, April 29; Vancouver, May 6; Seat- 
tle, May 13; Portland, May 20; Salt Lake 
City, May 20; Denver, May 27; Oakland, 
May 6; Milwaukee, May 27, and Chicago 
Palace, April 30. The houses in the fol- 
lowing cities will all close with the week 
of May 12: Fresno, Stockton, Sacramento, 
Kansas City, Omaha, Des Moines, Minne- 
apolis, St. Paul and Lincoln. The closing 
date of the Columbia Theatre, St. Louis, 
b.a not yet been decided upon, although 
the house will undoubtedly be dark. 



The first Orpheum Theatre to reopen 
will be the one in Memphis, probably 
some time in late August, after which the 
other theatres of the circuit will quickly 
follow suit. 

According to J. J. Maloney, of the Keith 
Circuit of New York theatres, the fol- 
lowing houses will remain open in New 
York all summer: Royal, "Bush-wick, Pros- 
pect, Greenpoint and Palace. This does 
not include the Alhambra, Colonial and 
Riverside, although the advisability of 
keeping the latter running is being con- 
sidered. 

While the Alhambra is dark it will 
undergo considerable enlarging and re- 
modeling. 

Keith's house at Brighton Beach win 
open the latter part of May. 

The Loew and Proctor houses will ad- 
here to their past policy and remain open 
all summer and the Moss and Fox inter- 
ests will do likewise. 



ELLIS IN HOSPITAL 

Melville Ellis was removed to the New 
York Hospital last Thursday Buffering with 
typhoid fever. The act of Ellis and Bor- 
doni was at that time appearing at the 
Palace Theatre. Anatole Friedland, who 
formerly appeared with May Naudain in 
vaudeville, immediately started rehearsing 
and Bordoni and Friedland went back into 
the Palace bill on Saturday. This week 
Bordoni and Friedland are at Keith's 
Theatre, Providence and it is reported that 
Wilis is doing nicely at the hospital. 



MdNTOSH BOOKS RENAULT 

Francis Renault, the "Female Imper- 
sonator," after concluding his Pantages tour 
will sail from San Francisco for Australia 
where he will commence an engagement 
on the Mcintosh Circuit, at Sydney, July 
1. Abe Fein berg procured the route. 



MYSTERY OVER GIRL SINGER 

Considerable mystery has been created 
along Broadway, regarding the identity of 
Caroline Caution, in whose behalf dramatic 
editors, and others have been ehowered 
with postal cards describing her as a trio 
in one, capable of singing either as a 
soprano, baritone or bass. Discovered in 
r Western cabaret, where her freak voice 
attracted attention, she Is soon to be of- 
fered as an attraction in vaudeville. 



MOSS TO HAVE NEW THEATRE 

Work on the new B. S. Mors Theatre, 
which will be erected on the northwest 
corner of Broadway and One Hundred 
and Eighty-first Street, will begin within 
a few days. The theatre will have a seat- 
ing capacity of 3,012 and the cost of con- 
struction has been estimated at a half 
million dollars. 



FILMS GET BILLit REEVES 
Wllkes-Babbe, Pa., April 1. — Billie 
Reeves, who closed his engagement here 
today at Poll's, has signed a contract with 
the United States Motion Picture Cor- 
poration and will spend practically the 
entire summer in this city - producing and 
appearing in Black Diamond Pictures. 



EFFIE SHANNON IN NEW ACT 

Effie Shannon, late of Kelsey and 
Shannon, will show a new act entitled 
"Champagne" at the Palace, S. I., this 
week. In the act, which is described as a 
comedy of bubbles, by Edwin Burke, she 
will be assisted by Regan Pughston and a 
big company. 



DE LEON AND D AVIES ROUTED 
Walter De Leon and Mary Davies have 
been routed until next January on the 
Orpheum circuit with their new act "Be- 
hind the Front." They are at the Orpheum 
Theatre, Minneapolis, this week and are 
taking the place of Hussey and Woolsey, 
who left the Orpheum road show in order 
to be able to rest up for a new production. 



"COUNTRY STORE" QUITS 

"The Country Store," a vaudeville act 
which has been playing about New York 
lately after concluding its engagement at 
the Eighty-first Street Theatre, last Sun- 
day, was "shunted" to the storehouse, the 
reason ascribed being that the booking of- 
fices would not pay the. figure asked. 

ADELAIDE TO CLOSE SUNDAY 

After the conclusion of their perform- 
ance at the Colonial Theatre on Sunday 
night, Adelaide and Hughes will disband 
their company for the season. Aft si a 
short rest the couple will make their debut 
in motion pictures. 

RATH BROS. MOVED UP 

The Skating Venuses entered the bill at 
the Palace Theatre Thursday and the Rath 
Brothers were moved to open the second 
part. On Sunday, Bernie and Baker sub- 
stituted for the Bath Brothers, who were 
also appearing at the Colonial Theatre. 



HAPPY BENWAY HAS NEW ACT 

The Seven Happy Minstrels is a new 
act which will go out at the close of this 
season. Happy Benway will be featured 
and will have as assistants Paul Le Londe, 
Geo. Faust, Joe Andre, Earl Holmes, John 
Matlick and Bill Doran. The act will be 
under the direction of Pete Mack. 



MISS COGHLAN STARTS TOUR 

Rosalind Coghlan will begin her tonr of 
the Orpheum Circuit next Monday at Cal- 
gary, Can., in a new playlet by George 
Bloomquest, entitled "Our Little Bride." 
In her company are Joseph Allenton, Dolph 
Ryan, Clyde North and Arthur Hadley. 



STUART WALKER CANCELLED 

Stuart Walker and his Portmanteau 
Players experienced a short vaudeville life, 
being cancelled from the Colonial bill after 
Monday's matinee. Walker's company 
was using "The Very Naked Boy" as its 
vehicle. 



NEW PALACE ASSISTANT 
-George Norton, formerly of the Hippo- 
drome box-office staff hat been engaged as 
assistant to Dave Mayor, in the Palace 
theatre box-office. 



LOEW SIGNS MORLEY 

Victor Morley & Co., in "The Regular 
Army Man," have been provided a route 
of ten weeks over the Loew Circuit open- 
ing at the Orpheum theatre, Boston, next 
Monday. The act was placed by Lew 
Leslie. 



MILLER & VINCENT SPLIT 
After being together five years, Helen 
Vincent and Eddie Miller have terminated 
their stage partnership. She will present 
a single act in the future. He is re- 
hearsing an act with his brother, Tom 
Miller. 



NEWS MEN ENTERTAIN FOGARTY 

8ai» Francisco, Cal„ April 2. — The 
newspapermen's club is preparing a special 
party for Frank Fogarty, "the Dublin 
minstrel," who Is playing an engagement 
at the Pantages Theatre here. 



BENT HAM IS LIEUTENANT 

M. S. Bentham, who has given his 
yacht, the Psyche V., to the government for 
the Naval Reserve, ha* been given a com- 
mission as lieutenant. The Psyche V. is 
to be equipped with gunB. 



CROUCH BOOKS NEW ACT 

Clay Crouch, the blackface comic, Is to 
be featured in a new act by Ned Dandy 
entitled, "Oh, You Devil." The playlet 
will carry a cast of ten and la booked for 
the Pantages Circuit. 



RUSSIAN PLAY FOR LIEBERT 

Sam Liebert and company are rehears- 
ing a new playlet which deals with the 
present political revolution in .Russia. 
The playlet will receive its vaudeville 
premiere shortly. 

NEW ACT READY 

Flo Allen and Anita Hammond will 
make their vaudeville debnt in a skit pro- 
vided by Ben Bernard, on the Sheedy Cir- 
cuit, next Monday, opening In Providence. 



ARCHIE PRESENTS NEW ACT 

Will Archie presented a new act en- 
titled . "Young Love" Monday at Proc- 
tor's Twenty-third Street Theatre. He 
was assisted by Edith Alden. 

H. O. H. HAS BIG BILL 

This is "Spring Festival" week at the 
Harlem Opera House, and Manager Harry 
Swift is presenting ten acts each half. 




WANTS CABARETS LICENSED 
Albany, March 31. — Abner C Green- 
berg, of New York, introduced a bill in the 
assembly last week for the licensing of 
cabarets in New York State. The fee to be 
exacted Is to be $500 a year, the same aa 
the theatre license fee. Hie bill adds 
restaurants and hotels to the list of place* 
covered by the present law, which requires 
licenses for entertainments or performances, 
"in any building, garden or grounds, concert 
rooms or other places or rooms within the 
city" in which six or more persons partici- 
pated. 



WIDOW MUST FILE ACCOUNTING 
Mrs. Genevieve V. Stewart baa been or- 
dered by Surrogate Cohalan to file an ac- 
counting of the estate of her husband, Mel- 
ville Stewart, the actor and singer, within 
* week. Failure upon her part to obey the 
order may result In another proceeding di- 
recting ber to show cause why she should 
not be punished for contempt of court. 



NIELSEN FOR LIGHT OPERA 

Alice Nielsen, operatic and concert sing- 
er, is to star under the management of 
Comstock A Gest in a musical version 
of the Belaaco play "Sweet Kitty Bel- 
lairs," which will be renamed "Kitty 
Darling." 



DANCER SUES FOR SEPARATION 

Yahne Floury, known aa a society 
dancer, last week brought suit for separa- 
tion from Leopold Kohls, a musician, al- 
leging, through her attorney, non-support 
and cruelty. 

DORZIAT FOR VAUDEVILLE 

Gabrielle Dortiat, who was with Wil- 
liam Faversham in "The Hawk," will 
shortly make her vaudeville debut in Max 
Marcin'a playlet, "The Purple Vial." 



MAGGIE CLINE RECOVERING 
RED Bark, N. J., April 2. — Maggie 
Cline is well on her way to recovery from 
an aggravated attack of neuritis and is 
convalescing at ber home here. 



ELKS TO HONOR WILSON 

The New York Lodge of Elks will tender 
a testimonial concert and vaudeville show 
to Luke Wilson at their Lodge Rooms on 
Saturday evening, April 28. 



DES VALLS TO PLAY FAIRS 
Chicago, April 3.— Olympla Des Vail 
and family will re-organize after their De- 
troit vaudeville showing and play fairs for 
tbe summer season. 



BUZZEbL WITH LA VINE CO. 

Eddie Buzzell, late comedian with the 
"Earl and the Girls" company, has been 
engaged as juvenile for Arthur La Vine 
and company. 



MRS. CASTLE SEEKING PARTNER 

Mrs. Vernon Castle intends returning to 
the vaudeville stage if she can find a danc- 
ing partner who comes np to her require- 
ments. 



LYONS WITH LESLIE 

Arthur S. Lyons has ■esocistod himself 
with Lew Leslie, tbe vaudeville manager, 
to book and manage acts. 



MACK RETURNING TO VAUDE 

Happy Mack announces that he has 
brushed up his act and will shortly re- 
enter vaudeville. 



BRICE AND KING CANCEL 

Brice and King were forced to cancel 
at the Bushwick this week, owing to the 
illness of Brice. 



DOROTHY MEUTHER 

Singing Comodienna 



PEGGY O'NEIL HAS PLAYLET 
Peggy CNeil will soon begin a vaude- 
ville tonr In Lester Lonergnn'a Irish play- 
let, "Peggy." 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 




COLONIAL 

Whether it was because the audience on 
Monday night was none too anxious to see 
the twelfth episode of "Patria" or because 
Santly and Norton, in the final spot, 
were exceptionally good, the fact remains 

that this clever duo were greeted with on- 
restrained applause at the end of their 
offering and succeeded in completely stop- 
ping the show. Even when the moving 
picture curtain was lowered and the lights 
were out for the aerial, the applause con- 
tinued and the lights were flashed on 
again while the pair responded to the 
applause with another bow." 

This pair are masters of the art of 
successfully patting over popular songs 
and scored with every number they 
attempted. Their Italian number was 
particularly effective. 

Adelaide and Hughes were the headlin- 
ers, supported by their capable company, 
and found things easy going in closing the 
first half of the show. The first number, 
"The Birth of the Dance," ia injured by 
lighting which Is entirely too sombre, mak- 
ing this number tend toward dullness. 
Hughes, as Pan, scores his usual big hit. 
Adelaide's Hawaiian dance is a gem of its 
kind and is done in a natural, unaffected 
way that few Hawaiian dancers attain. 

Their war ballet, "The Garden of the 
World," brought the act to an applause- 
storming close and Is as fine as anything 
of its kind ever attempted on the variety 
boards. However, with the advent of the 
United States into the European conflict, 
the act is going to lose much of its point 
and effe cti v en ess, and it will be necessary 
to rewrite and revise the end. 

The show was opened by Frank and 
Addle Brighton, the "artistic ragpickers," 
who make portraits and paintings with 
scraps of doth and rags. The heads of 
Lincoln and Wilson were remarkable like- 
eneanes. The act waa a pleasing opener. 
Jack Ryan and Blllie Joyce warmed up the 
house with their "Spring Styles in Songs," 
Byan doing most of the singing and Joyce 
tickling the ivories. The red bead song is 

a clever number, and the new jajnt song 
went well. 

The Three Sallys, replacing Stuart 
Walker's "The Tery Naked Boy," held 
down the third spot nicely. Their talk at 
the tea table waa rather witty. The Bos- 
tonlsn !■ a capable comedian. The girl 
would find her solo number to be a bigger 
hit If ahe would not repeat the chorus. 

Billy Gould, looking as dapper as ever, 
had a lot of new stories about the war, 
from a humorous angle, of course. He 
knows how to tell a story and the audi- 
ence enjoyed listening to him. A song 
eulogising George Cohan for six or seven 
minutes seemed to have no particular place 
in the act. The Irish military song with 
which Gould closed, is a dandy number 
for finishing. Gould possesses a likable 
personality and easily holds his own on 
the bill. 

Maleta Bonconi followed intermission, 
billed as the "celebrated European Violin 
Virtuoso." She poss esse s excellent tech- 
nique and plays the instrument In a mas- 
terful way. Her first two selections 
seemed a bit too similar to follow each 
other, and she might improve her act by 
changing the order of her routine. 

"The Swan," which was played with 
the mate, was by far the best thing ahe 
attempted. The audience appreciated her 
work, and it can be said In Miss Bon- 
coni's praise that she did not resort to 
popular melodies to win approval. 

Kate minor and Sam Williams are pre- 
senting what they term "an original epi- 
sode." entitled. "TJp to the Minute and 
Then Some." which win be reviewed under 
New Acts. 

Santly and Norton closed the vaudeville 
bill, followed by Mre. Vernon Castle in 
"Patria." H. G. 




RIVERSIDE 

The Hearst-Pathe News Pictorial of the 
many stirring military events of the past 
week was enthusiastically received, and 
waa followed hy the Gaudsmiths, eccen- 
tric clowns who did some good tumbling. 
Two Spanish poodles that tumble nearly 
aa well as the men contributed largely 
to the success of the act. 

The D'Avigncau Chinese Duo, a pianist 
and singer in a pretty Chinese set ren- 
dered several popular and operatic selec- 
tions. Tang Cheong, the singer, who is 
billed as the world's greatest Celestial 
ginger, possesses a light baritone voice of 

{ (leasing quality and rendered the pro- 
ogue from "Pagliacci" acceptably. A pro- 
nounced vibrato is going to cause him 
trouble later on. This vocal defect, sad 
to record, was probably acquired in an 
American studio. 

The Sharrocks, give the familiar mind- 
reading act with a new and novel twist. 
They open as two fakere following the 
country fairs and put up their little tent 
behind the grand stand. The woman 
mounts a box to demonstrate her powers 
before the crowd and the man harangues 
the listeners. The mind reading portion of 
the act is particularly good and is worked 
with great speed and accuracy. 

Harry Gilfoil, who aa the whistling 
waiter in Hoyt's Trip To Chinatown" a 
quarter of a century ago, entertained 
thousands has retained a large portion of 
the act all these years, and with good 
reason, for his Imitations are "sure fire." 

Emma Cams assisted by Larry Comer, 
was the bright spot of the bill, as this 
talented entertainer ia giving 1 one of the 
best acts she has been seen in for a num- 
ber of seasons. Her songs are well select- 
ed, she sings them excellently, dances well, 
and best of ail she has a wonderful sense 
of humor. In Larry Comer, she has an 
able assistant and of all the vaudeville 
partners, that have appeared with Miss 
Cams, he seems the best. 

Jack- Norworth'a three years abroad 
have left an indelible stamp upon him and 
his work little resembles that of a few 
years ago. He has personality and is wise 
in the selection of his material, but if he 
were a new act, instead of an old friend 
returned after a long absence, it is very 
doubtful if he would have been as well 
received as on Monday night, when he 
was compelled to respond to several en- 
cores. His songs were good and he has 
thoroughly mastered the art of enuncia- 
tion, and in consequence none of the 
points in any of his selections were lost; 
Ringers with far better voices and greater 
ability than he possesses could get some 
valuable instruction from him in this par- 
ticular. 

Sam Mann &, Company in the new Aaron 
Hoffman sketch "The Question." furnished 
an amusing twenty minutes, for in spite 
of its rather impossible situations, there is 
much In it that is hound to please. Mr. 
Mann, the unknown old gentleman who 
with much wisdom solves the troubles of 
all and In the end is found to be only 
an escaped inmate, of a sanitarium for 
the weak minded, gives a really fine char- 
acter impersonation.- 

Oeorge White and Lucille Cavanagh gave 
their familiar repertoire of songs and 
dances. They are a talented couple cap- 
able of holding down a late spot on any 
'■ill, hot whether it was due to the late- 
ness of the hour or the gradual loss of 
interest in dancing acts in general, they 
did not arouse the enthusiasm which us- 
ually fa accorded them. W. V. 



ROYAL 

Nan Halperin, who was billed to appear 

in a new act, presented her old, familiar 
repertoire, the new offering not being 
ready for presentation. However, the old 
one went over so effectively that Miss Hal- 
perin was quickly forgiven for using it 

Miss Halperin fa a finished artist and 
her work fa the quintessence of cleverness 
and originality. All of her songs and im- 
pressions, from the little "kid" to the 
merry widow were performed in a way that 
belongs only to a true artiste. 

Sharing honors with her were Sam and 
Kitty Morton in their popular offering, 
"Back to Where They Started." The 
applause at the end of their turn at Mon- 
day's matinee would be music to any per- 
former's ears. Although this reviewer did 

not see this team at their debut thirty- 
six years ago, he can safely say that they 
were never more popular or clever than at 
the present writing. They are the style 
of performers who enjoy more than 
transient popularity and are always wel- 
come on any bill, at any time. They 
were assisted In their last number by their 
two youngest children, Margaret and Joe. 

After a Hearst-Pathe News Pictorial, 
Frank Le Dent opened the show. The 
only particular in which he differs from 
other jugglers fa the attractive setting 
with which the act fa dressed. His work 
fa good bnt rather along a beaten track. 

Caryl and Flynn were In the second 
spot and pleased with their singing, al- 
though the man sings through his nose un- 
pardonably. The woman has a very pleas- 
ing voice and plays the piano well. 

Boy Bice and Mary Werner were gen- 
uinely funny In "On the Scaffold," which 
will be reviewed nnder New Acts. 

Dyer and Fay found it easy sailing with 
their absurdity, "Whafs It All About?" 
Although no one knows what it wss all 
about, the fact remains that everyone was 
laughing at Frank Fay. He has a unique 
method of putting his comedy over which 
is quickly appreciated for its full worth. 
Dyer fa nothing 'more than a passable 
"filler" for Fay's comedy. The girl in the 
act Is very attractive bat is forced to hide 
her light under a bushel because, for 
some Inexplicable reason, her name never 
appears on the program. She works fully 
as bard at Dyer and deserves some kind of 
recognition on the program. 

Lnbowaka, with her Associate Artists, 
presents a very slow act. The woman Is 
a good dancer, bat has chosen a vehicle 
called "Soul Flame" which has an action 
that Is difficult to follow, even with a 
synopsis of it printed in the program. 
The four girls in the act dance wonder- 
fully and deserve special praise. LnbowBka 
and her company is hardly the kind of an 
act for an audience of the Royal's dis- 
position. Frequent giggles, sneezes and 
unrest in the audience were apparent dur- 
ing the offering. 

The show was closed by the Nicholas 
Nelson Troupe who can rightly bill them- 
selves as "Vaudeville's prettiest novelty." 
Besides ' being clever manipulators of the 
hoops, this quintette thoroughly appreciate 
the importance of putting effectiveness and 
life into their work. Everything they per- 
formed was done with an appreciation of - 
this in mind. The act was one mass of 
color and attractive effects. Each stunt 
spelled Showmanship. There is not a 
classier act of this kind on big time. The 
five fellows look very neat in their white 
flannels. ' 

The crowd remained to see the twelfth 
episode of "Patria." H. G. 



PALACE 

A big crowd packed Into the theatre 
early to see the twelfth episode of "Patria" 
which fa proving to be more of a Keystone 
aa each installment is shown. The comedy 
in the picture, however, is of the uninten- 
tional type and shows rank carelessness in 
the catting. At times, one has to grip 
his seat in order to withhold a brash 
at what should be taken seriously. 

The opening of the show with "Patria" 
was necessary on account of a film being 
used in the March's lion act, which closes, 
and, as an experiment, it was worth try- 
ing. Everything ran evenly and with un- 
usual speed for a long bill that bad the 
lion act, Lambert and Ball and "The Four 
Husbands" as the hits. 

Lohse and Sterling pot over a solid bit 
with a dandy routine of acrobatic feats on 
the trapeze, which was further enhanced 
by several bright bits of comedy. Mlsa 
Sterling fa to be " complimented on her 
good taste in selecting a wardrobe. 

Joe Cook In the second spot took a great 
deal for granted, bnt, nevertheless, proved 
a laughing hit with his original Idea of a 
"one-man vaudeville ahow." He was 
cordially received until he started singing 
a ballad. 

"The Foot Husbands" returned with 
practically the same cast, and Bay Ray- 
mond, Florence Bain and George W. 
Jinks were really the important items of 
the miniature comedy. The act was 
finely costumed and one new number sang 
by Ray Raymond scored. The comedy of 
Jinks fa a worth while feature for the act. 

Savoy and Brennan repeated their 
success of last week with their quaint idea 
of comedy. 

Ernest Ball and Maud Lambert closed 
the first part with a corking good' song 
novelty. Ernest Ball was at his very best 
with a good routine of new numbers. Miss 
Lambert, gorgeously gowned, sang several 
numbers and harmonised well with Mr. 
Ball, scoring a bit 

After the intermission "The Headline™" 
went exceptionally well, with Henry B. 
Toomer featured. The idea of the song 
and dance team coming from Chicago to 
New York to make good ; the meeting of 
the single woman on the bill, who turns 
out to be the wife of one of the team and 
the general enlightenment of the public as 
to the conditions of the small timer in 
vaudeville is good. Many old gags are 
employed bnt the act gets the results at 

the finish. 

.May Irwin, assisted by Clifford Hess, 
supplied an interesting turn with her talk 
and songs. Miss Irwin's opening number 
fa by far the best In her routine. Her - 
set fa reviewed nnder New Acts. 

Georges Marck offered a decidedly in- 
teresting act called "The Wild Guardians" 
In which a ten minute motion picture fa. 
shown, after which the story is carried on 
in real life. Four lions, introduced at the 
closing, proved that Marck is not alone a 
clever showman bnt stands to a class by 
himself es a trainer of wild beasts. The 
act is finely handled and is a big feature 
for any theatre. S. L. H. 

CITY OFFICIALS IN MOVIE 

San Francisco, April 2. — Mayor James 
Rolph, Superior Jndge Graham and other 
city officials became prominent figures in 
a movie that fa being partially made in 
San Francisco. Playing the leading role 
la tbe film fa Capt. Robt. Ferguason. 



STTGREAVES QUITS "WANDERER" 

Beverly Sltgreaves has left "The Wan- 
derer" cast. 



rVGSS WYCHERLY HONORED 

Margaret Wycherly. who plays the lead- 
ing role in "The Thirteenth Chair," will be 
the guest of honor at the meeting of the 
Theatre Assembly, to be held April 13. 



SCHEFF CABARET OPENING SET 

Fritz! Scheff will make her debut aa a 
cabaret star April 13 at the Palais Royal, 
Broadway and Forty-eighth Street, which 
opens on that date. 



WHITNEY IN SAN FRANCISCO 

San Fkancibco, March 80. — H. G. Whit- 
ney, manager of William Crane in "The 
Happy Stranger," fa In this city supervis- 
ing Crane's engagement here. 

NORWORTH READY BY AUGUST 

The Norworth Theatre, which Edward 
F. Rush fa building In West Forty-eighth 
Street, will be completed early in August, 
and win house Norworth and Shannon's 
continental review called "Odds and. Ends 
of 1917." 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




RICHARD CARLE & CO. 

Theatre — Palace, Btaten Itland. 

Style — Comedy Playlet. 

Time — Twenty minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

Oarle, who portrays a man who is 
trying to evade a process server, hap- 
pens into the flat and, finding nobody 
home, goes to bed. The fat cook, 
played by Florence Morrison, finds him 
in the morning and, after several bits 
of choice comedy, informs him that she 
is the cook and, as he most be the new 
boss, she was expecting, she is ready 
to take orders. Carle, realizing she has 
mistakes him, "gets on," and takes the 
part. 

Meanwhile, Billy Broker, who is evad- 
ing Secret Service men, enters with his 
sister, and, taking Oarle for the renting 
agent, hires the flat for $200. From 
then until Billy's sister's husband ap- 
pears, the act is funny. The husband 
appears and, thinking Oarle his wife's 
sweetheart, "plants" a bomb to blow 
them up. 

Everything is explained, however, 
The real landlord appears and shoos 
the bunch out with an officer'. Carle 
slip the officer the $200, and then the 
officer ducks back and divides it with 
the landlord and cook. They leave the 
money on the table and drink to the 
cook's health. 

Meanwhile Oarle comes back by 
means of the firescape and gets the 
money. 

This last part could be revised, and 
by shortening could be made a great 
deal better than it now stands. 

H. S. P. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued on Fag* 33) 



RICE & WERNER 

Theatre — RoyaL • ■ 

Style— Negro dialogue ikit. 

Time— Seventeen minute*. 

Setting — Special. 

Blanche Merrill hit npon an original 
idea in "On the 8caffold," and Roy Rice 
and Mary Werner are just the team to 
put it over for all that It is worth. 

The act ia done in two, the drop rep- 
resenting; a two-story house. A negro 
painter is discovered seated upon his 
scaffold, parallel to the first story. Ha 
is painting the side of the house. A col- 
ored woman servant is leaning out of a 
second-story window talking to him down 
below. 

He asks her to come down and join 
him, and her efforts to climb out of the 
window take up considerable time and 
famish much of the fun of the act After 
several unsuccessful attempts, she suc- 
ceeds, with several mishaps. 

The pair, seated on the scaffold, carry 
on a conversation made funny by the 
clever lines, which are really typical of 
negro types. 

The doorbell is heard ringing in the 
house, and the woman's efforts to climb 
back result in the breaking of the scaf- 
fold. . 

The act is one long laugh and ought 
to be a sure cure for the blues. H. O. 



MAY IRWIN 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Piano and song act. 

Time— Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — One. » • 

May Irwin, with Cliff Hess at the 
piano, offered a novel singing and talk- 
ing act in which Hess merely accompan- 
ies Miss Irwin at the piano. 

Her opening number, entitled "Home 
Sweet Home," is by far the best of her 
repertoire and, although she announced 
that her various stories were old, they 
nevertheless brought many laughs. Miss 
. Irwin was accorded a big reception and 
after singing four songs took four bows 
and several floral offerings as an 
acknowledgment of her entertaining abil- 
ity. S. L. H. 



KATE ELINOR & CO. 

Theatre — Colonial. 
Style— Song and talk. 
Thae— Nineteen minute*. 
Setting — One and two. 

Although Kate Elinor and Sam Will- 
■ lama have what they style "an original 
episode,"- it will never set the world 
afire for its originality. "Up to the 
Minute and Then Some," which is. the 
' name of the aUt, is composed of rather 
ordinary material which entertains no 
more and no less than any other stand- 
ard act of its sort. 

The skit starts with a number of cross 
fire gags, Williams acting as a feeder to 
Miss Elinor. The gags are rarely con- 
nected one to the other, and it is simply 
a case, over and over again, of W illiams 
asking a question to which Miss Elinor 
igives a funny answer. Most of the gags 
have not been heard before. Williams 
then leaves the stage, and Miss Elinor 
entertains with a brief monologue. This 
part of the act ia done in one. 

The drop then rises and Williams, 
seated at the piano renders a couple of 
vocal selections in two. The first num- 
ber, concerning love being a gamble, is 
well sung, and its clever lyrics help it 
along. The second number, which is an 
Impression of Eddie Leonard, Is a poor 
one. 

Miss Elinor then sings a song which la 
put over rather cleverly. 

The pair complete their act in one with 
some more cross-fire gags. Williams sings 
a noisy song, while Miss Elinor does 
some ordinary stepping as a closer. 

H. O. 



CARYLL A FLYNN 

Theatre— Proctor'* 23rd Street. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Thirteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

"The prima donna and the tenor" is 
the manner in which this couple is billed. 
And they are all the billing implies, both 
of them possessing pleasing voices, aug- 
mented by personality, which is all that 
is necessary to constitute an acceptable 
vaudeville offering of this type. 

Their repertoire consists of several 
classical and popular numbers, with Miss 
Caryll at the piano. The songs cannot 
be said to be anything unusual, being just 
on a par with the average routine used 
by most singing acts. With the voices 
this couple possess there should be no 
reason why they do not select something 
more exclusive, so as to place their turn 
a bit above the average when they would 
find a desirable market for their act aa a 
feature in the neighborhood theatres. 

A. U. 



LUCY DALY 

Theatre— Proctor'* 23rd Street. 

Style — Singing commedienne. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Lucy Daly, better known as Lucy Daly 
Ward, wife of Hap Ward, of Ward and 
. Vokes, is making her vaudeville debut In 
a character singing act. In the presenta- 
tion of her vaudeville turn Miss Daly has 
not lost any of her old-time personality, 
vivaclousness, or pretty and pleasing 
'lisp." All of these qualities help great- 
ly toward making her offering a pleasing 
and desirable one as a feature turn for 
neighborhood theatres. 

The repertoire of songs used by Miss 
Daly are all of the character variety. 
She might add another song to her 
routine, so as to carry her act along for 
a few minutes longer when she win have 
an offering which will be sought aftpr for 
neighborhood theatres. A. V. 



FRANKIE HEATH 

Theatre— Proctor'* 23rd Street. 
Style — Singing comedienne. 
Time — Sixteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Frankie Heath is a young lady who 
possesses personality, ability and other 
qualities that go far toward making 
her a desirable acquisition for a goon 
spot in the two-a-day houses. 

Her opening number, which consists 
of songs and talk about the troubles 
of a "department" store girl, quickly 
establishes her with the audience. Her 
impressions of the different types of 
costumers that visit the establishment 
are realistic and true to life. 

The second number is a song about 
"The Girl Who Hates Herself," which 
is well done. 

The third one is entitled "The Adver- 
tising Jubilee/' It is a song about 
various advertised foods and standard 
articles. Miss Heath should receive a 
royalty for using this song from the 
concerns which manufacture these arti- 
cles, for her advertising value to them 
is on a par with the billboards or the 
street ears. 

Her concluding song ia a story about 
a man who desires to forsake her. She 
uses her accompanist as the subject. 

It might be suggested that Miss 
Heath allow her accompanist to play a 
solo, she^ utilizing the time employed 
to make a change of costume. This 
innovation would greatly enhance the 
value of the act, for at present she ap- 
pears in only one costume throughout. 
A. TJ. 

BERT & HARRY GORDON 

Theatre— Kiohty-fint Street. 
Style— Talk and tong. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

These two boys appear aa a "straight" 
and a Jew. After the first renders a 
short solo the Jew enters and the two 
indulge in some comedy patter. The 
subject drifts to love, and the straight 
demonstrates to the Jew how to make 
it. The straight then proceeds to give 
* his partner a singing lesson. This Is 
followed by a parody song which con- 
cludes the turn. 

The' patter is funny and the comedy 
business in the act is well done. 

The singing lesson is particularly well 
acted, and is a sure-fire laugh getter. 
The straight's singing doesn't amount 
to much, but his partner makes so much 
fun of it, it is just as well so. H. O. 

GOLDEN TROUPE 

Theatre — De Koto, Brooklyn. 
Style — Ruitian dancing and tinging. 
Tfme — Twenty-one minute*. 
Setting- -Special. 

This troupe, billed as ten persona, but 
numbering only eight and an orchestra 
leader, present an act entitled "Christmas 
Bve in Moscow," in a Russian set rep- 
resenting a snowy Christinas Bve in a 
Russian city. 

A very pretty semi-choral number 
opens the act This ia followed by a 
duet rendered poorly, which should be 
eliminated, confining the act to dancing 
after the opening number. 

The remainder of the act consists of 
several Russian dances, into which is 
injected plenty of "pep" and bard work. 

A toe dancer is given a specialty, 
which is one of the brightest spots in 
the act 

The act is a standard act of its type 
and will find it easy going on the Loew 
Circuit, H. O. 



"BRIDE OF THE NILE" 

Theatre — Royal. 

Style — Musical comedietta. 

Tim»— Thirty-three minute*. 

Setting — Special. 

This is a musical offering, with an 
old-fashioned musical comedy plot, 
which is welcon ed again as a change 
from the many girl acts which have 
lately graced the variety boards. The 
book and lyrics are the work of Edgar 
Allan Woolf. Anatol Friedland wrote 
the music. 

"The Bride of the Nile" is the best of- 
fering of Woolf'a that this reviewer has 
seen for some time. The lines sparkle. 
The situations are genuinely funny. 
The lyrics are pleasing. The plot is 
meagre, but une crnnot expect a better 
story in the short time of thirty-three 
minutes. 

The music is tuneful, with melodies 
that are bound to please. 

Louise Simon, supported by a com- 
pany of seventeen appears in the piece. 
As Peter Tibbitte, who, in an effort to 
escape from his wife, has been found by 
the Egyptians in a mummy-case and 
worshipped by them as a dead god, 
Simon is luoicrously funny, and has 
an easy time extracting laughs. 

Henry Antrim has a powerful and 
pleasing voice, and sings two very 
pretty duets with Janet Velle. 

The chorus possesses more singing 
ability than does the general run of 
choruses and wor..s well together. 

H. O. . 



MISS AMERICA 



i ' ! 



ilj 



Theatre— Kioito, Chicago. 

Style— Muticcl tabloid. 

Time — Twenty minute*. 

Setting— Open* in one, closet in fulL 
Special. 

Frank Allis and Jean Waters, sur- 
rounded by six girls and a man, are re- 
vealed in a recjtoiting station, situated In 
Central Park, New York. Allis appears 
as a recruiting officer and Jean Waters, 
in riding habit, makes application to en- 
list They sing several songs and enter 
into rapid-fire comedy dialogue. 

The songs are permeated with military 
Savor and the chorus backs the principals 
with evolutions replete with spirit and 
dash. Though almost plotless, the pres- 
ent national crisis makes the offering 
welcome to the audience. 

The second scene shows sn encamp- 
ment on the Hudson River, with a fort In 
the background, as the girls begin target 
practice. Principals continue comedy 
chatter, with a sentimental scene of a 
wounded soldier injected, which leads the 
way to more songs. 0. N. 



THREE TAYLOR TWINS I 

Theatre— Wilson Avenue, Chicago. ' \ 

Style— PugWetio comedy. ' 1 

Time— Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — Open* in one, dotes special fuU. 

Three neatly-built, muscular youngsters 
have bsought an act into vandeville that 
measures far above the usual opening or 
closing act from the standpoint of 
originality and maintained Interest 

They try to make it a singing, talking 
and fighting act but inasmuch as they 
know more about fighting than either of 
the other specifications, it is fortunate 
that they confine their singing to a single 
introductory song relating to the joy of 
boxing. 

After the Introductory song they enter 
upon an original dance conception, every 
few steps ending with the exposition of 
some famous punch in fighting aMaasa 
The conclusion of the act Is a comedy 
combat in a prize-ring, occupying full 
stage. Two of the boys wallop each other 
lustily, the third acting as referee. Good 
comedy Is injected when a punch, in- 
tended for one of the fighters, floors the 
latter. a N. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



LAURENCE SCHWAB 

PRESENTS 

GEORGE 

SKIPPER 



AND 



MYRTLE 

KASTRUP 

Singers of Songs 
That Are Different 



What 



the "Variety" and 
Thought of Our Act. 



i< 



Star 



» 



Skipper and Kastrup. 
Songs and Talk. 
14 MLns.; One. 
RoyaL 

Here is a genuinely good "straight" singing turn, 
one of those combinations that seem capable on 
ability alone to hold up in any company regardless 
of circumstances. At the Royal the management 
misplaced them in the No. 2 spot for they rightfully 
belonged in the second section, where the show 
needed a lift. Their routine of solos and duets is 
cleverly broken during the rendition of "Shanghai" 
by a section of exceedingly bright talk that gathered 
a laugh at every point. Mr. Skipper is a nifty look- 
ing chap with a good voice, while Miss Kastrup does 
her share in the appearance division. They earned 
one of the real big hits of the Royal program Mon- 
day night and deserved everything received. 

WYNN, "Variety." 



Geo. Skipper and Myrtle Kastrup with a fine line 
of songs, corking good harmony and several fine 
comedy bits, were an early score. They put over 
their act in classy and showmanlike manner, making 
every point count. Her" are two real singers who 
can harmonize and articulate plainly so that the 
lyrics of the songs can be fully enjoyed. They went 
great. S. L. HARRIS, "Star." 



DIRECTION ALF. T. WILTON 



An Open Letter 
Of Appreciation 

to Jos. W. Stern & Co. 
Exclusive Selling Agents 

Gentlemen^ 

I want tp pxtcnc! to you my sincere and rte-iTtieU thank? :■■.: the 
wonderful work you have done for my song. "l J iui- for the Lights 
U> C .'■; Out," 

\Vhen Mr. Tunnah and I hrst wrote it ; I fell reasonably sure" 
thai :'. \vas a hit: when I ai ranged with you to take charse of it. I fell 
thai it W'as an assured success- But never did I diemi that it would 
l.econieilhe l;;g selling sensation that you have made r.. It, has" ex- 
ceeded al! "my expectations, and my gratitude, is your^ 

.My appreciation is best shown bv turning over to \ou ih ;- dav 
rm entire catalogue ot new numbers: "// Takes a /..-.-•-;, / ui!. StUtph 
Skin 0al to ;\/u.Vc a Picacha Lav His Bible Don:!." "Si;:2 \fc 
the Melody of. Lore," "IViier, My Greaf-Crur.d-DdJdv ar.d \fy 
L.iCiii-Ciaiui-MuniniY- -UacJ .'<; Cuddle and CV>-. .•; j}£.'oc<;<iritil 
Free. \J v < H em I ; A> YS/tti rfhshdr ot Love. ''T-iwjrt LlaggoiiA 
TiziUn'Bliics." "Aar,.<.<. Love's Cieal Divide" and "J .VeVci A>ked 
!■ C->me to Tliis World." . . 

I have received .inany ria'.ienng oilers from many publisher? 
tor :hese. but you have shown me what an Orgahf^Stlbn iike vours 
can cio : Uhercfoi e. they go to you. as did "P>\iy toy \:hc ~Libh;:-. / 
know you vvili do for themwhai you did fordthal nutivbeir: for I ha\e 
put my best in them. 

With my sincere appreciation of your splend:<j elforls in my' 
behalf. I am Yours. 

Will E. Ski dm ore 



Skidmore Music On. 



Kansas Citv. Mo., Apri! 2. r917- 



BERT HOWARD 

M 

The Man from Marion, Ind. 

First Half: Harlem Opera House 
Last Half: Fifth Ave. Theatre 



EDDIE VINE 



In "A Study in Songs 



» 



Direction PAUL ALLEN 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




Founded in 1&S3 by Frank Queen 

Published by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Or land W. Vaughan. ..President and Secretary 

Frederick C Mailer Treasurer 

1604 Broadway, New York 
' Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 
ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 
Paul C Swcinhart, Managing Editor 

NEW YORK, APRIL4, 1917 

Entered June 24, 1879, at the Poat Office at 
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Address All Communications to 
THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

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Thj Ojfpxi cam as OBTAlMBn W901XSALX AMD 

axtail, at our agents, Daw's Steamship Agency, 
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Avenue de I Opera, Paris, France; Manila, P. L: 
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Stationery Co., 128 Escolta Street, Sydney, 
N. S. W., Australia. 



Bell Is Right 

The Medical Recicic of Revieics pre- 
sented last Friday afternoon at the Thirty- 
ninth Street Theatre, "Fruhling's Er- 
wachen," n propagandist work by Frank 
Wedekind. 

7 he performance was given under an 
injunction granted by the courts after Com- 
missioner of Licenses Bell had refused to 
issue permission to present the work on 
the ground that it was nasty and unfit for 
a public presentation. .Of course the court 
order prevented Commissioner Bell from 
interfering with its production, but the 
consensus of. opinion of those who witnessed 
the showing was to the effect that the stand 
taken by the Commissioner ' was the only 
jnst and proper one to take. 

"Fruhling's Erwachen" is probably the 
nastiest example of pruriency that has ever 
soiled our stage. It is the last word in 
its line and, unless the authorities take 
drastic measures to put an end to such 
presentations the time will come when self 
respecting persons will almost be afraid 
to enter a dramatic theatre. 

Theatrical managers have a hard 
enough struggle to bold public favor with- 
out a transitory organization making their 
work harder. The manager pays a big 
license for the privilege of conducting his 
theatre. He is ever among the first to 
contribute to charity or other public pro- 
ject, either by money or services or both. 
And he should not be permitted to present 
any nauseous offering such as the work 
of Wedekind. If he dared to present it 
he would forfeit his license. 

But The Medical Review of Review* 
Kems to be above the law and, nnder the 
guise of being a public benefactor, it pre- 
sents a work which is only fit for a clinic. 
Medical students and scientists are the 
only ones fitted by their calling to view 
Wedekind's subject with a healthy mind 
and the harm done to the general public 
by a presentation in the theatre is incal- 
culable. Its teachings are likely to have 
an unmoral as well as immoral effect upon 
the lay mind. 

Above all, the granting of a permit for 
a performance of this kind establishes a 
precedent The first offering of this so- 
ciety, in fact the offering that brought it 
into being, was of a similar nature, 
though not quite so disgusting. 

In his refusal to sanction a production 
of the Wedekind type. Commissioner Bell 
proved his right-mindedness and his action' 
should be upheld by the law. 



Answers to Queries 

S. K., Moose Jaw, Sask. — Half a dozen 
big patriotic films have been made in this 
country in the last three years — "Birth of 
a Nation," "Fall of a Nation," "Battle 
Cry of Peace," "The Flying Torpedo" and 
others. The only one directed by Griffith 
was "The Birth of a Nation." 

• • * 

Wilson J, Charlotteville, W„ Va. — Ton 
might as well ask for a man's right arm 
as to request an infallible way for an 
amateur to enter the movies. Bach one of 
the persons you see on the screen reached 
the position they now hold by various 
routes and, if it were possible for you to 
receive an answer from all of them, it 
would be found that they all succeeded in 

different ways. 

• • • 

E. X, Jersey City. — 1. Al Reeves is a 
burlesque producer and is well connected 
and known in the burlesque world. 2. 
Yes, .burlesque is,, strictly speaking, aside 
from the rest of the theatrical business. 3. 
If your work is as good as you state, I have 
no doubt, whatever, that you will be able 
to interest some of the big theatrical pro- 
ducers in it. » ' •* i 

W. W. H:, Chicago. — Each player except 
C withdraws his money. C's money re- 
mains in pot, as penalty for opening pot 
illegally, and is played for in the next deal. 
B has no standing, in spite of the fact he 
held queens and 4s, as he patsed before C 
opened. » » . 

N. R. L-, Los Angeles. — If an article or 
story is copyrighted and "all rights are re- 
served," yon cannot legally take a play 
from it without first obtaining the consent 
of the owner. With, that consent the copy- 
right of the play holds good. 



CLAIMS TEAM STOLE ACT 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir. — Just a line to let you know 
that O'Connor and Dixon have stolen my 
entire act; via., "Hired and Fired." 

This act ia my own personal property. 
I have it protected, and if they don't stop 
using it, I will have to take legal means 
of stopping them. 

O'Connor and I separated last Novem- 
ber. I was ill and had to cancel the But- 
tcrfield time which we had booked to play. 
When I could not appear, O'Connor went 
to New York, taking my original music 
and joined Dixon. 

He joined the White Rats in San Fran- 
cisco unbeknown to me. I was unaware 
of the fact nntil Barry Conners, White 
Rats representative, came to Oakland and 
asked me to join, saying that my partner 
had done so. I told him that I had re- 
tired from the Rats seven years ago and 
had no intention of re-joining. I am a 
member of the N. V. A., and I expect you 
to co-operate with me in protecting my 
material. 

I open in Pittsburgh April 9th for the 
D. B. O. and will be in New York soon 
playing the same act, with a new opening. 

Trusting you will give this your atten- 
tion, I remain. 

Yours respectfully, 

Tudor Cameron. 

1414A Semple Ave. 

Co-author with Ed. Flannigan of "On 
and Off" and sole author of "Hired and 
Fired." 



DRAMA LEAGUE ENLARGES SCOPE 

Decatur. 111., March 26. — The Decatur 
Center Of the Drama League of America 
has decided to enter a field of greater ac- 
tivity in fostering amateur and pageant 
movements. 



span] 



■ I 




Correspondents Wanted 



THE CLIPPER 
Wishes Live, Wide-Awake Representatives 

EVERYWHERE 



NEWSPAPER MEN PREFERRED 



Is 

il 



5 = 



in , i i i | !i]:n:i'.iN.i.L;iinui,i:iii;i:i:iiiii'j,i,i.Dijmjiimm 



UV.hfl t_~ 

IB 



Will J., Lexington, Ky. — Barnum & 
Bailey's big circus moved into Madison 
Square Garden over a week ago and gave 
the first public performance for this season 
last Thursday night Such acts as they 
use are very well paid. 

• • • 

W. A. P. — , Binghamton. — We have had 
no route of Arthur Chatterdon Stock Co. 
for some time. You might address party in 
care of this, office and we will advertise let- 
ter in Cltpfeb letter list.. . 
a» *> .• 

Miss B. C, Chicago. — 1. Charles Sum- 
ner is the author. 2. We have no means 
of knowing when the play will be presented 
in Chicago, and have no record of its having 
been pictu rized . 

• • • 

W. J. M., Buffalo. — No, Frances Starr ia 
not married, although a report of her en- 
gagement has been widespread on several 
occasions, only to be denied. 

• • • 

T. M., New York.— "Mile-a-Minute Ken- 
dall" was produced at the Shubert Theatre. 
New Haven, Nov. 10. It is a comedy. 
Owen Davis, author. 

• • • 

"Nedrab" Trenton. — We would advise 
yonr making application to some leading 

dramatic school. 

• • • 

Agent. — The Guide is published by Gus 
Hill, Columbia Theatre Building, New 

York. 

• •- • 

W. H., New York. — The original team 
of Hallen and Hart was composed of Fred 
Hallen and Enid Hart, bis wife. 



WOULD FORM ACTORS* UNITS 

Editor, The Xew York Clipper. 

Dear Sir: I read, with much pleasure 
your recent editorial .on the patriotism of 
the profession. While no one would ever 
accuse Thespians of not being good patri- 
ots, still, it speaks well for them to be 
among the first to state the sacrifices they 
are willing to make. Pacifists, too, oeem 
scarce in the profession, there being few 
actors among those who seem unwilling 
to fight for any life other than their own, 
or to stand up for principles for which 
their forefathers died. . 

I think that if the rime comes for snch 
a move, regiments of actors should be or- 
ganized in different sections of the coun- 
try, just as other military units among 
the different professions are sure to come. 

Hoping to see more such editorials in 
your excellent paper, I remain, 
Yours very truly, 

Hkhby Dbvskond. 

Boise, Ida., March 10. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Fay Templeton returned from Europe. 

Louis Mann was with "Incog." 

The Hotel Royal at Fortieth Street and 
Sixth Avenue, New York, was burned. 

Pat Rooney died at New York City, 
shortly after being brought from Wil- 
mington, Del. 

"The Human Ostrich'' died at St.' Louis, 
Mo. 



R1ALT0 RATTLES 



RHYMED INTERVIEW NO. a 

When actors have some legal woe, to 
Harry Steinfeld they all go. He daily 
doles out good advice to anyone who has 
the price. The more bis efforts seem to 
please, just so much larger are his fees. 
To a pretty little chorus dame, he'll work 
for pure love of the game. But to as old 
maid, staid and sour, he'll charge one hun- 
dred bones per hour. When once advising 
Anna Held, he asked her what the lovellght 
spelled that lurks within her naughty eyes, 
but even a lawyer can't get wise. 

"WATCH HER STEP." 

When Arthur Hammeratcin returned 
from Bermuda the other day, he found 
his secretary, Tess Levy, wearing a 
watch on her ankle. Mystified, he in- 
quired the reason. 

"Well, why shouldn't I wear a watch 
on my ankle?" answered Teas, "when 
thousands of girls have worn clox on their 
socks?" 



RESISTA VS. SUNDAY 

When Billy Sunday cornea to town, they 
ought to play Resists across the street at 
the Audubon Theatre. She's a cute little 
thing, you know, and when the men in the 
audience are invited to squeeze her and lift 
her, there is a wild scramble. Keep her at 
the Audubon and Billy'a revival will be a 
frost. 



BROTHERS AGAINST BROTHER 

When the Friars paraded to the Strand 
last week to see the George M. Cohan 
picture, notably absent from the procession 
were Friars S. L. Rothapfel, Edwin Mm- 
cary, Chas. Stewart and Hamish Mae- 
La urin. What was the matter, boys? 



ID? TO PLAYWRIGHTS 

Now that the price of paper has mounted 
to such an extravagant height, those plays 
which every third person in New York baa 
buried away in (heir trunk, should become 
of importance — to paper dealers. 



JOINS THE HALL OF FAME 

Frances White has joined the class with 
Eddie Foy, Eddie Leonard, Bert Williams, 
et al. No impersonator's act seems com- 
plete now-a-days, unless it contains an "im- 
pression of Frances White. 



BUT WILL IT? 

When B. Iden Payne accepted "The 
Grasshopper" for production, it is said that 
he did so because he hoped it would hop 
right into. public favor. 



GIVE HIM CREDIT, B0YS1 

Al Reeves procured a permit to carry a 
pistol from Magistrate Steers in Brooklyn 
last week. 'Must be his first step towards 
preparedness. 



A TRIFLE 

Mack Stark lost bis Ford car last week. 
As long as it was not an onion or a po- 
tato, he should worry! 



WHO WROTE IT? 

"Repertoire" seems to be a very jwpular 
play in light of the number of actors ap- 
pearing in it 



NAMED RIGHT 

A new Sim magnet has the name of 
Backer. Who says there's no significance 
In a name? 
LIVING UP TO ITS NAME 

"A Nigger in the Woodpile" will have to 
stay in the woodpile, because it can't find 
a theatre. 



A LOSING WINNER 

According to Pittsburgh opening night 
reports, "The Man Who Lost" has won. 

PASSED BY CENSOR 

"Wash Day," which Is rehearsing for 
vaudeville, ought to be a clean act 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



LONDON 



PARIS 



FOMEmM MEWS 



BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



LbsjbVm, Eng., March 24. 
Sidney Black plays Middlesbrough next 
week. 



Biah and Biah were at the Palace, Lin- 
coln, thia week. 



The Four Shades are in Dundee next 
week. 



MUly and Gordon were in Ipswich thia 
week. 

Hyde and Hilton play Hereford next 
week. 



Greta Mack opens next Monday at the 
TiToli, New Brighton. 

Mr. Hymack was at the Playhouse, 
Wakefield, thia week. 

Cooper and Balnea play the Palace, Yeo- 
vil, week after next. 



Tom Wilby closes to-night a week at 
the Olympia, Cardiff. 



The Khaki Boys were at the Palace, 
Manchester, thia week. 

The Royal Toktwa Family play Shef- 
field week of April 2. 



Harry Blake played this week at die 
Imperial, Canning Town. 

James Held opens next Monday at the 
Pier Pavilion, Torquay. 



The Exposition Three play the Empire, 
West Hartlepool, next week. 



The Lady Shoeblacks are closing to- 
night a good week in Birmingham. 

Daly and Healy will open on the L. T. 
V. Toot week after next at the Empire, 
Holborn. 



H. S. Maguire, with his wonder horse. 
Mascot, played the Palace, Carlisle, this 
week. 



Capt. Charles Nlcholls is still Meaner- 
■tin* st the Hy-iropathic Hospital. Har- 
rogate. 



Eva Wright is finishing the week at the 
Palace, Glasgow. 

Florrie Gallimore opens at the Palace, 
Plymouth, April 2. 

The Montagues were at the Palace, Read- 
ing, thia weak. 

Ella Fields was at the Hippodrome, Bil- 
ston. this week. 



Patti Loft us opens on the Stoll To or 
next Monday to play return dates. 



Edgar Curtis returns to town April 2, 
when he opens at the Empire, Shepherd's 
Bosh. 



George Graves will resume his Music 
Hall work shortly. 



Zarry closes a good week to-night it 
the Pavilion, Neath. 

The Keystones return to town May 14 
for a six weeks' stay. 



The Three Morrellys who played the Pal- 
ladium this week return to London 
April 16. 

Fits and Gerald, playing the Tivoll, Hall, 
this week, open next Monday at the Palace, 
Doncaster. 

Howard Bellman play Rugby next Mon- 
day, and follow with the Syndicate Halls, 
in London. 



Marie Santoi is having success every- 
where she appears with her revue, "The 
Pearl of the Orient" 



Alice Delysia, after a stay of two years 
at the Ambassadors Theatre, is touring 
the provinces in "Search Me." 



Jimmy Chandon, late of the Chandons, 
is now Private J. Barlow, and training 
with the R. W. F. Home Defence. 



Arthur Harrison, manager of the Hlp- 
iwdrome. Bolton, has been granted exemp- 
tion from military service until Jane 3D. 

Owing to the serious illness of his 
mother, Reg. Ewen cancelled his Spring 
tour with Fred Clements revue, Tm 
Sorry." 



John Hengler, late of the Hengler 
Brothers, has been transferred from the 
Northampton to Cllpstone Camp, in the 
Machine Gun Corps. 



Betanconrt played a return date this 
week at the Hippodrome. Aldershot, and 
opens next Monday for a return week at 
the Empire, Oroydon. 



Ernie King i s no w playing the principal 
role in J. J. Wild's Lancashire sketch, 
■ 'Listing for a Soldier," having joined last 
week at the Athambra, Barnsley. 



Edith Cairns* Five Gold Flakes played 
a return date this week at the Palace, 
Malton. 



Bert Lane, late of the Laue and Dale 
Trio, who is Lieut R. H. Webber, of the 
King's Rifles, has been promoted to the 
rank of Captain. He is only 23 years of 
age and Is one of the youngest captains 
in the service. 



Sergt-Major Joe Grossman, of the 
Grossman Twins, has been mentioned in 
dispatches for bravery. 



"A 'Spoor Adventure," at the Globe, 
with Kenneth Douglas and Iris Hoey, 
seems to have caught the public fancy. 

T. Aynsley Cook, the well-known and 
popular manager of the Empire. Edin- 
burgh, has nearly recovered from his long 

illness. 



William Pearson has resigned his posi- 
tion as manager of the Coliseum. Bnrs- 
lem, to become proprietor of the Wedge- 
wood Arms Hotel, which has long been 
the professional headquarters in that city. 
He takes possession a week from next 
Monday. 



Rosa Hamel was at the Empire, Chia- 
wick, this week. 

The Khaki Boys were at the Palace, 
Manchester, this week. 



The Juggling Jays close to-night a good 
week at the Palace, Beading. 



Mark Sheridan made them laugh this 
week at the Empire, Liverpool. 



"Seeing Life," Ernest C. Roll's success- 
ful revue, has three weeks more to run at 
the Oxford. 

George Lawrence is playing the role of 

Lord Bluffer in the Anglo-French revne, 
"Au Revoir, Paris." 



Wilfred Bumand has scored a success 
in the new skit, "Maudie de Vere," writ- 
ten by John Warr. 



John LawBon plays the role of a Man- 
chester cotton broker in "The Dowry," 
which was produced at Chelsea last week. 

"100 Tears Ago" is the title of John 
Tiller's latest musical production, which he 
presented last week at the Empire. Not- 
tingham. 



The Four Clovelly Girls played the Opera 
House, Tunbridge Wells, this week. They 
open April 2 at the Empire, Glasgow, for 
a tour of Scotland. 

Albert de ConrvUle wfl] shortly send a 
"Zig-zag" company on the road. He win 
also send "Flying Colors" out for a tour 
of the Moss Empires. 



Jo e Sboebridge, booking manager of the 
Wffl Collins Agency, who recently Joined 
the Royal Naval Air Service, has been 
transferred from London to "somewhere" 
In Ireland. 



Charlton Mann has arranged for a tour 
of "Felix Gets a Month." under the direc- 
tion of N. Carter-Slaughter, who will pre- 
sent It once-nightly or twice-nightly, as 
occasion may require. 



Conway George, who is attached to the 
Royal Welsh Fusiliers, writes that he is 
ptffl suffering from the shrapnel wonnd in 
the hand which he received just before 

Christmas at the front in France, but 
that he expects to be bade on the firing 
line very soon. 



James Taylor is successfully appearing 
In C. B. Cochran's "Half-past Eight." and 
is doing well in the provincial bans. As- 
sociated with him are Fred Edwards. Tom- 
my Mostol and Yvonne Granville. 

Rennie and Rox. when the railway re- 
strictions became operative, were so con- 
vinced of the impossibility of compressing 
their musical tin cans into hundredweight 
packages that they bought a motor car, 
and now they say they wouldn't know how 
to set along without it. They don't have 
to worry about train schedules or baggage 
checking, nothing but gasoline. 

In the cast of "The Other Bing Boys." 
the new-old revne at the London Opera 
House, are Augustus Yorke, Robert Leon- 
ard, EHa Retford, MRue Sim, Nancy Buck- 
land. Kathleen Starling, Pip Powell. Doug- 
las Maclaren, Ha] Bert, the Four Vaga- 
bonds, Lydia and Francis. Fred Whit- 
tiker, J. Bast, Diana Dnrand. Kathleen 
BoutaU. May Davis, Margaret Stuart 
Peter Wiser, Richard Webb and Vera Do- 
ree. There are two shows a day. after- 
noons and evenings. 



MISS ROCKWELL IN QUEENSLAND 

Bmsbanc, Aus., March 27. — Florence 
Rockwell is appearing in "The House of 
Glass" through Queensland, and is dupli- 
cating her success elsewhere on this con- 
tinent. 



Fred Barnes has subscribed 5,000 pounds 
to the War Loan. 



Nat Gold and Rich Taylor are In the 
Manchester Regiment 



FOLLIES RETURN TO SYDNEY 

Sydney, Aus^ March 28. — The TivoU 
Follies Company, after a phenomena] tour 
of the inland towns, is back again at the 
TivoU here. 



Marjorie Stevens is playing the Gulli- 
ver Circuit, giving three dances. 



H. V. Esmond, the playwright-actor, is 
recovering from his serious 1Hho«q 



Albany Ward purchased the Empire, 

Bridgewater, last week for 3,500 pounds. 

Daisy Taylor has recovered from her 
recent indisposition and is again at work. 



THEATRES TO BE HOSPITALS 

London, Eng„ March 26. — There are 
persistent rumors around town that cer- 
tain leading- West End theatres have been 
"commandeered" by the Government for 
hospital use. 



Adeline Genee revived "A Dream of 
Butterflies and Roses" last week at the 
Coliseum. 



YANKEE ACTS FOR SOUTH AFRICA 

Sydney, Aus., March 27. — A number of 
American acts, which have been appearing 
on the Hugh D. Mcintosh Circuit having 
filled their Australian contracts, sailed for 
South Africa. 



ROBERT LORAINE PROMOTED 

London, Eng., March 28. — Captain 
Robert Loraine has been appointed a wing- 
commander in the Royal Flying Corps, 
with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel while 
so employed. 



VIENNA SUPPORTING SHOWS 

Vienna, Austria, March 16, — In spite 
of the war the producers of musical shows 
and comedies have given the public a good 
supply of them this season and the attend- 
ance has been good. 



NO YOUNG MEN IN LONDON SHOWS 

London, Eng., March 26. — The majority 
of the chorus men now seen In the musical 
shows in London are between the ages of 
40 and 60 years, the rest having all gone 
to war in some capacity. 

NEW STRAUSS WORK FOR AMERICA 

Vienna, Austria, March 17. — "Ariadne 
at Naxos" is likely to be the next Strauss 
opera heard In New York. Arrangements 
have been completed for its American pro- 
duction after the war. 



LEHAR AND FALL WORKS FAIL 

Vienna, Austria, March 18. — Neither 
"The Star Gaxer" by Lehar nor "Rose of 
Stamboul" by Fall have succeeded here, and 
negotiations for their New York produc- 
tions have come to an end. 



PASSES 650TH PERFORMANCE 
London, Eng., March 25. — Although "A 
Little Bit of Fluff" was an absolute failure 
in New York, Londoners have shown their 

U £H g for '** "^ lMt week il "warded its 
650th performance at the Criterion. 

CANNOT LEAVE ENGLAND 

London, Eng., March 25.— The three 
Kavanaghs are unable to play South 
America as booked, owing to the fact that 
the authorities wHI not permit women or 
children to leave the country at the present 
time. 



McINTOSH SIGNS BILLfE SEATON 
Sydney, Aus., March 28. — Miss Billie 
Seaton has been engaged by Hugh Mcin- 
tosh for his TivoU Circuit and is now on 
her way to this country. She Is accom- 
panied by Ray Trasnor, who wHI appear 
with her. 



VIENNA TO HEAR FOREIGN WORKS 

Vienna, Austria, March 18. — Not in 
years has the program of the Chamber 
Opera contained such a meritorious list of 
one and two-act operas by Italian, French 
and Russian composers. It Includes works 
by Cimarosa, Dworzak. Tschaikowaki, 
Enna and Lafitte. 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW VOKK CLTPFR 



5B 




MILLER COAST 

CO. OPENING 

IN MAY 

SEASON TO BE FOR TEN WEEKS 



With the termination of his engagement 
over the local "subway" circuit, April 21, 

in "The Great Divide," Henry Miller will 
immediately start for San Francisco, where 
he will commence his regular summer 
stock engagement at the Columbia Theatre, 
May 21. 

Prior to leaving, Mr. Miller will engage 
about twenty performers, who will accom- 
pany him on the trip. The season at the 
bouse will be for about ten weeks, during 
whicb time Mr. Miller will present two or 
three plays, one of which is a new play 
being written by A. E. Thomas. This play 
will be used as the opening attraction in 
Miller's new New York Theatre next sea- 
son. 

The company will include Ruth Chatter- 
ton and the cast of "Come Ont of the 
Kitchen," which was given its first presen- 
tation by this company last year at the 
Columbia. Miss Chatterton is to appear 
in this play at the Columbia for a five- 
week period, beginning July 2. It is a 
question whether the Chatterton company 
win make the trip with Miller, or go along 
later, playing engagements en route at St. 
Louis, Kansas City, Denver, Salt Lake 
City and Los Angeles. 

Upon the arrival of the Chatterton com- 
pany, Mr. Miller will use the members of 
both companies for his productions on the 
eosst It is quite likely that bis opening 
offering at the Colombia will be "The 
Great Divide." 

Miss Chatterton and the members of 
"Come Out of the Kitchen" have signed 
contracts with Mr. Miller to appear in this 
play under his management for the next 
eighteen months. At the termination of 
their engagement they will have been with 
the show for two years. 

It is quite likely that Miss Chatterton 
will appear In "The New Tdrk Idea," which 
was used as a starring vehicle by Minnie 
Maddem Fiske and Grace George, at the 
conclusion of her "Come Ont of the 
Kitchen" engagement Mr. Miller will 
probably be seen in this play also. The 
run of the piece will be limited to two 
weeks. 



STOCK FOR LEXINGTON PARK 

Lexington, Mass., April 3. — The Lex- 
ington Park Theatre will open its third 
season under the management and direc- 
tion of Joseph H. Thayer with a high class 
stock company, June 15. This summer 
park is situated within a short trolley ride 
of Boston and is under the management 
of John T. Benson. 



"WHICH TO MARRY" IN STOCK 

"Which One Shall I Marry?" is being- 
given its first stock presentation by the Fifth 
Avenue Stock Co. at the Fifth Avenue 
Theatre, Brooklyn, this week, and the offi- 
cers of the 14th Regiment Armory, Brook- 
lyn, have been invited to attend the per- 
formance to-morrow night 



FOR PROVIDENCE MUSICAL CO. 

Providence, April 3. — Among those who 
will appear with the Lyric Musical Stock 
Co. at the Providence Opera House this 
Summer will be Jack Squire and Frank 
Rowan. 



JUVENILES MAKE N. Y. DEBUT 

Edward Kirby and Edward' Sedan, who 
have been playing juvenile roles in West- 
era stock, are making their Eastern debut 
in "Hans and Frits" at the Lexington 
Opera House. 



KEITH PORTLAND CO. ENGAGED 

Portland, Me., April 2. — The cast en- 
gaged for the Keith Stock Co. opening 
next Monday includes besides Alma Tell 
and Jack Roseleigh in the leading roles; 
Raymond Bramley, second man; Houston 
Richards, juvenile and light comedies; 
Mark Kent characters; Blanche Friderid, 
characters; Warren P. Munsell, producing 
stage director; David F. Perkins, stage 
manager and general characters, and 
Byron W. Nichols, scenic artist. With the 
exception of Mark Kent the company is 
the same as last season. 



UEB TO HAVE CO. IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, April 2. — Herman Lieb has 
taken over the management of the Wilson 
Avenue Theatre and will install a dra- 
matic stock company there for a season 
of four or more weeks some time in May 
or June. Mitchell Harris, leading man 
with the Players Company in St Louis, 
has been engaged to play leading roles 
with the Lieb company. Mr. Lieb win be 
stage director and intends to produce one 
new play during the engagement 



BURGESS PLAYERS IN TAMPA 

Tampa, Fla., March 31. — The Hazele 
Burgess Players, under the management of 
Bert Leigh, opened an engagement at the 
Tampa Theatre recently for four weeks. 
The opening bill was "Jerry." In the cast 
besides Hazele Burgess and Bert Leigh are 
Stuart Bobbins, Joseph Remington, 0. 
Russell Sage, Jessie Livingston, Bess 
Brower, Clyde Smith, and Larry Richards. 



MANAGER'S DAUGHTER JOINS CO. 

Seattle, Wash,, March 31. — The daugh- 
ter of Tom Wilkes, manager of the Wilkes 
Players at the Orpheum Theatre here, 
made her debut with the Wilkes Co. last 
week in "The Rose of the Rancho." She 
is playing under the name of Beverly 
Howard. 



NEW PLAY IN SOMERV1LLE 
SoirxxvnxE, Masc, March 31. — The 
SomervUle Theatre Players produced a 
new play last week entitled "The Tempta- 
tion" for the first time on any stage. It 
was written by Edward Massey. 



LAURA WALKER FOR POLI STOCK 

Worcester, Mass., April 2. — Laura 
Walker, who has been appearing in dra- 
matic productions, has signed as leading 
woman with the Poli Stock Co., which 
opens here next Monday. 



BRYANT CO. FOR YOUNGSTOWN 

Youngbtown, O., April 2. — The Mar- 
guerite Bryant Players, now appearing at 
the Empire Theatre, Pittsburgh, will move 
to the Grand Theatre here April 16 for an 
indefinite engagement 



CLOSE DURING HOLY WEEK 

Nokthamiton, Mass., April 2. — The 
Northampton Players, at the Academy of 
Music, will be closed this week and win 
reopen next Monday with "Shore Acres." 

JOIN NORTHAMPTON CO. 

Northampton, Mass., April 2. — George 
Ridden and Mande Snyder are recent ad- 
ditions to the east of the Northampton 
Players at the Academy of Music. 



FARGO CO. CLOSES 

Faego, N. D., March 31. — The Orpheum 
Theatre Stock Company, with Edna Mar- 
shall and Ward T. Cassidy in the leading 
roles, "has closed here. 



PICKERY CO. TOURING 

Tajtpa. Fla., March 31.— The Pickert 
Stock Co. has closed its engagement here 
and has gone on the road. 



BENNETT WILL 

HAVE CO. IN 

FRISCO 



TO PRODUCE NEW PLAYS 

San Francisco, March 31. — Richard 
Bennett, who is a member of the Lew 
Fields cast in "Bosom Friends" in New 
York, is going to install a dramatic stock 
company at the Alcazar Theatre here this 
Spring. 

The company will be almost exclusively 
a producing company, as Mr. Bennett in- 
tends to try out plays which have never 
been seen before on any stage. Other plays 
wiU also be given, but these will include 
only those which have never been presented 
in Frisco. ■ 

Mr. Bennett has already accepted a 
number of plays, including one by the Hat- 
tons, one by Grace Heyer, a new French 
play by Edward Bamedot, a new Brierre 
play and a new play by Augustus Thomas. 

He has secured the Alcazar Theatre for 
an unlimited period and will take possession 
as soon as the Fred Belasco Company, 
which is now opening at the house, com- 
pletes its season. 

The company will be different from the 
ordinary run of stock companies, not only 
in that it will not present the usual stock 
plays, but the players, who are being re- 
cruited from the dramatic stage, will not 
adhere to any special kind of role. For in- 
stance, the leading lady one week may play 
a very minor role the next. All the play- 
ers wiU be leading players. 

Among the members of the cast already 
engaged are Ethelbert Hale, Mrs. Hassell, 
Beatrice Allen, John Wilbur. Maud Milton 
and Adrian Morrison. 



Mr. Bennett, when seen in New York, 
confirmed the above report and in at present 
organising the company. 



FLOATINC THEATRE OPENS 

Elizabath Crrr, N. C, March, 3'i. — 
Hie James Adams Floating Theatre, the 
Only one on the Atlantic coast, opened its 
fourth season, March 12, with the follow- 
ing roster: Kathleen Wanda, leads: Kate 
Shuman, character; Beulah Adams, soo- 
brette ; Walter Sanford, leads and director ; 
Charles Hunter, juveniles ; Billy. Stolhman, 
general business; Harry Schuman, heavies, 
and Jamie Bratton, comedy. 

James Adams is owner and general man- 
ager ; Mrs, Gertrude Adams, treasurer : 
"Sel" Adams, house manager; Mrs. "Sel" 
Adams, secretary; Harry Van, advance 
representative; Lyn D. Johnson, master 
electrician: Capt "Bffl" Allen, captain; 
"Hamp" Aldredge, concessions; "Holland 
Ward," chef; "Pop" Neel. leader band and 
orchestra. 



STOCK ACTOR PLAYS REPORTER ■ 

WEBSTER, Fla., March 31. — Edward 
MacArthur, -who is playing leads with the 
Franklin Stock Co. through the South, 
had an opportunity to try his band at 
newspaper work while playing this city 
recently. Mr. MacArthur volunteered to 
fin the vacancy caused by the illness of 
one of the staff on the local paper. 



GEO. BUTLER CLOSES CO. 

GRAND Rafids, Mich., March 3L — The 
George Butler Stock Co. closed its season 
at Vandergrift, Pa., last week. There 
were no changes made in the roster of the 
company during the tour. Mr. Butler is 
spending a few weeks at his home here. 



BROOKLYN CO. GIVES NEW PLAY 

This week the Daniels Stock Company 
at the Grand Opera House, Brooklyn, is 
presenting for the first time on any stags 
a new play entitled "The Second Wife." 



MUSICAL CO. IN GRAND ISLAND 

Grand Island, Neb., March 31. — F. 
Mortimer Mitchell, owner of the Michel- 
son Theatre, has installed a musical com- 
edy company at the house, after the 
Mitchell Dramatic Players, of which he 
was also manager, closed last Saturday. 
The dramatic company will shortly go on 
a road tour under canvas, playing through 
Nebraska and Iowa. 



NEW MGR. AT HAVERHILL HOUSE 

Haverhill, Mass., March 31.— There 
has been a change in the management of 
the Academy of Music, Mr. Cuddy, who 
has been the manager since the opening of 
stock there, is retiring, being succeeded by 
Bernard Steele, formerly of the Walnut 
Square Theatre, Philadelphia. The public- 
ity win be in the hands of Francis Crouton, 
a local man. 



KEITH BROOKLYN CO. CLOSES 

The Keith Stock Co. at the Gotham 
Theatre, Brooklyn, closed Saturday night, 
after a three weeks' engagement. The 
company goes to Portland, Me., for the 
opening of the Keith Go. there Easter 
Monday. It is probable the Gotham The- 
atre wil be used as a moving picture 
theatre. 



DIMOCK WITH PATERSON CO. 

Patebson, N. J., April 2.— Wm. H. 
Dimoer, of the Hathaway Theatre, Brock- 
ton, Mass., is the new stage director of the 
Winifred St Claire Co. here, succeeding 
Thomas Coffin Cooke, who goes to Tren- 
ton with the No. 1 company. 

DOYLE HAS CIRCUIT STOCK 

In diana P008, March 31. — Robert 
Doyle, of the Doyle Stock Co., hag in- 
augurated a Circuit Stock working out of 
this city, which is meeting with great 
success. But Aug. 1 will find him on the 
road with a repertoire company. 

LEWIS & WORTH CLOSE SEASON 

Gene Lewis and Olga Worth closed 
their stock company last week at Evans- 
ville, Ind., and are now in New York, 
where they will spend the spring reorgan- 
izing their company prior to playing 
Colorado this summer. 



EARLE GRANTED DIVORCE 

Sandusky, O., March 31.— L. A. Earls, 
owner and manager of the Earle Stock 
company, was granted an absolute divorce 
from his wife, Kitty Kirk, Wednesday. 
Mr. Earl in private is L. A. WHes. 



HATHAWAY PLAYERS CLOSE 
Bbockton, Mass., April 21. — The Hath- 
away Players closed their season hers 
Saturday night, presenting "Marrying 
Money." Ruth Lechler and Hooper Ateh- 
ley were the leading players. 



STOCK ACTOR FOR PICTURES 

Deb Moines, la., March 31. — John 
Warner has left as leading man of the 
Princess Players to enter motion pictures. 



OLIVER CLOSED IN RICHMOND 
Richmond, Ind., March 24. — The Otis 
Oliver Stock Co. has closed at the Murray 
Theatre and is moving to Peru, Ind. 



PRICE-BUTLER CO. IN DENNISON 

Dennibon, O.. March 31. — The Price- 
Butler Stock Co. has opened a stock en- 
gagement at the Rex Theatre here. 



ROBERTS WANTS PITTSBURGH CO. 

PrrrasuROH, April 2. — Nelson Roberts 
is considering a musical stock company 
for one of the local theatres. 



STOCK FOR MILWAUKEE 
Milwaukee, April 2. — A stock com- 
pany wiU be installed St the Davidson 
Theatre this Summer. 



w 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 




TWO PENNSYLVANIA BILLS 
THREAT EN COU NTY FAIRS 

One Prohibits Admission of Children Under Sixteen Even to 

Picture Shows; the Other Is for Tax on 

Show Tickets 



. Uabrisburq, Pa., April 2. — Two bills 
which threaten the County Fair business 
in Pennsylvania are pending in the Legis- 
lature. 
J. F. Seldomridge, secretary of the 

Pennsylvania State Association of County 
Fairs, has called the attention of all 
county fair secretaries in the state to these 
bills, and has asked their co-operation in 
the fight for their defeat. 

One of the bills prohibits the admission 
of any child under sixteen years of age to 
any exhibition or moving picture show, 
unless accompanied by an adult. This 
would include county fairs. The penalty 



for violating this measure is a fine not to 
exceed $100, or imprisonment 

The second bill is to levy a tax on all 
tickets sold by county fair shows or exhi- 
bitions. 

The secretaries have been asked to take 
up the matter with their members in the 
Legislature and Senates and get them to 
vote against the bill. The moving picture 
people, who are also affected by the mea- 
sures, are fighting them likewise. 

It is claimed that these bills would make 
it so hard on fairs and traveling shows as 
to make it almost impossible for either to 
exist. 



AMUSEMENT MEN APPEAL CASE 

Bridgeport, Conn.. March 31. — John J. 
Maboney and James L. Tierney, who con- 
ducted an amusement park near Derby, 
have filed an appeal in the compensation 
case of Evelyn C. Boyle against Mahoney 
and Tierney. The Compensation Com- 
mission decided the case and made an 
award to Mrs. Boyle of $6 a week for 312 
weeks for the death of her husband, who 
was employed as a boatman in the park, 
and who lost his life July 1, 1915, while 
carrying a passenger np the river. In 
their appeal, Mahoney and Tierney made 
several claims, all of which were over- 
ruled. 



N. O. S. A. STARTS CAMPAIGN 

The National Outdoor Showmen's As- 
sociation will launch a unique member- 
ship campaign within the next thirty 
days, according to the announcement of 
Secretary Frank L. Alberts. Every mem- 
ber of the association will be placed upon 
the membership campaign committee. 
The method of campaign has not been 
disclosed but the officers of the associa- 
tion promise that it will be conducted on 
a plan entirely different from that of an 
ordinary, business or trade organization. 

DELGARIAN TO REJOIN SHOW 

ChicaoO, March 31. — Baba Delgarian, 
who has been away from the Charles De- 
Kreko Shows on account of illness, is 
leaving to, rejoin the show at Columbia, 
S. C. Mr. Delgarian has been in a local 
hospital where he has undergone an op- 
eration on his hand. 



CHAS. MACK JOINS FERARI 

BrtrDGwroR, N. J., March 31. — Charles 
Mack, formerly of the Joseph G. Ferari 
Shows, who, for the past eighteen months, 
has had his own musical comedy show on 
tour, has taken over the Spidora Show 

with the Ferari Shows this season. 



PERFORMER'S WIFE DIES 

Nasrvtxxe. Term., March 31. — MattJe 
Ivea Duncan DeEspa, wife of the well- 
known cricus performer, Ernest DeEspa, 
died last week at Waterbury, Conn., after 
an illness of only a few hours. The body 
was shipped here immediately for burial. 



HARRY ROSE RECOVERS 

Houston, Tex.. March 31. — Harry A. 
Rose, late general agent of the Whitney 
Shows, has recovered from his recent ill- 
ness and has Joined the H. Katool and 
John Bashara caravan as agent 



ORGANIZING DIXIE AMUSEMENT CO. 

Scott Crrr. Kan., March 30. — John 
Odom is organizing the Dixie Amusement 
Co., for a tour which will open April 21. 



ORDER MEYERHOFF SHOW SOLD 

Lynchburg. Va., March 3L — In the 
Corporation Court Monday in the case of 
W. F. Mangels Co. vs. Henry Meyerboff, 
Inc., Henry Meyerboff and Edward Hirscb, 
the action being to recover indebtedness on 
negotiable notes in the sum of $5,050, with 
interest on $1,700 from April 15, 1916, and 
interest on $3,350 from April 25, 1916, 
Judge Frank P. Christian rendered judg- 
ment in favor of the plaintiff and the city 
sergeant was ordered to proceed at once 
with the sale of the property of the de- 
fendants here in the same manner as if it 
had been taken in execution upon a writ 
of fieri facias. 

The. property was attached before the 
last day of the Interstate Fair last year 
and has remained on the Fair grounds dur- 
ing the winter months. The Southern 
Equipment Co. of Atlanta, Ga., also holds 
a lien on the property and attorneys here 
endeavored to attach the goods before the 
close of the Fair last year. Fair officials 
averted this action and attached the prop- 
erty forthwith to secure the Fair after 
having advanced the midway people a large 
sum of money to come to Lynchburg from 
a point in Ohio. 



CLICK SHIPS NEW CAROUSEL 

Germantowtt. Pa., March 30. — William 
Glick, of New -York, arrived here today 
and completed arrangements for the ship- 
ping to Streator, 111., on April 1 of the 
prize winning portable carousel now 
under final stages of construction at the 
factory of the Philadelphia Toboggan Co. 
He has left for Streator, 111., the home of 
the World at Home Shows to make prep- 
arations for its arrival there in time for 
the opening of the season with the Clyde 
combination shows, of which the carousel 
will be the feature riding amusement 
device. 



CLYDE PURCHASES PRIVATE CAR 
Stheatob, nL, March 30. — The private 
car recently purchased by James T. Clyde 
from the Ringling Brothers at Baraboo, 
Wis., arrived here this morning via the 
Santa Fe Railroad and was at once 
tracked at the Crawford works, the winter 
home of the World At Home Shows train. 
A number of showmen and railroad men 
inspected it and congratulated Mr. Clyde 
upon his selection of such a luxurious home 
on wheels. The addition of this car gives 
the Clyde train seven state rooms, sleepers 
and dining car, and taken as a whole the 
finest show train in the world. 



NEW MCRS. AT EVANS VILLE PARK 
EvisavniE, Ind., March 31. — Cook's 
Electric Park is to be opened this season 
under new management Jacob Weber and 
Harry Laurence are to be in charge. 



RINGLING PLANS COMPLETED 
CHICAGO, April 3. — Ringling Brothers 
have completed arrangements calculated to 
make the Chicago season opening, Satur- 
day, more auspicious than any previous 
presentation of the monster performance. 
The Coliseum is the busy scene of constant 
rehearsing every day and every night. 
"Cinderella" will again be offered as an 
opening pageant with a cast including 
ballet of over fifteen hundred. 



BIG FOUR TRAIN JUMPS TRACK 
Gusnvuxe, Ga., March 3L — The train of 
the Big Four Amusement Co. was derailed 
while coming into this town from Darien 
recently, and most of the performers suf- 
fered injuries. However, these were slight, 
and the show was not delayed more than 
thirty-six hours. 

GENTRY BROS. OFFER HELP 

Mfmpitts. Tenn., April L — Messrs. New- 
man and Austin, owners of the Gentry 
Bros. Show, which wintered here, have of- 
fered their advertising crew to assist the 
Memphis-T. J. Harahon bridge celebration 
which will be held here in May. 



WASHBURN SHOW IN ACCIDENT 

Suwanee, Fla., March 30. — The Leon 
W. Washburn Mighty Midway Shows had 
an accident here when the wheel on one of 
the sixty-foot flat cars of the special train 
broke and held up the train for six hours. 
No one was injured. 



MARTIN JOINS SUPERIOR SHOW 

Ptttsbubgh, April 2. — Percy Martin, 
who had planned to take out his own show 
in conjunction with Phil McLaughlin, has 
given it up and is now general agent with 
the Superior United Shows. 



BARKOOT SHOW TRAIN WRECKED 

Statesvhae, N. C March 3L — Several 
wagons were damaged when a train crashed 
into the train of the K. G. Barkoot Shows 
near here, and several of the carnival people 
were injured. 



LOLA MITCHELL IN HOSPITAL 

St. Louis, March 31. — Lola Mitchell, 
well known in circus circles, is very ill at 
a local hospital, where she was sent after 
suffering a stroke of apoplexy. 



FROG BOY RETIRES 

El Paso, Ter., March 30. — S. D. Parks 
has been forced to retire from the road on 
account of having contracted tuberculosis. 
He is known to the show world as Hopp, 
the frog boy. 



KANES SIGN WITH POLACK 

Pittsburgh, March 31. — Max Kane and 
wife, who were with the Rutherford 
Greater Shows last season, have signed 
with Irving Polack this season. 



DAVIS PLACES SHOW WITH KING 
Ptttsbubgh, April 1. — Mr. and Mrs. 
Bill Davis have signed with the King 
United Shows to place their Garden of Al- 
lah attractions with them. 



WODETSKY AIDS GALLION FAIR 

Gallion, O., March 31.— J. C. Wodet- 
sky, promoter and concession man, is as- 
sisting a local committee in the promoting 
of an indoor fair. 



FAIR FOR FARRELL, PA. 

Farrell, Pa., April 1. — A big fair and 
bazaar will be held here next week and 
many amusement features are being plan- 
ned. 



H.-W. LEGAL ADJUSTER DIES 

Ma>sfield. O., March 3L — Charles S. 
Hagaman, legal adjuster of the Hagenbeck- 
Wallace Circus, for several years, died here 
Sunday morning. 



DAVENPORT JOINS B. * B. SHOW 

Chicago, March 22. — Orrin Davenport 
jumped to New York last week to join the 
Bamnm & Bailey Circus. 



HITCHCOCK WANTS CRAWFORD 

Raymond Hitchock is negotiating for the 
appearance of Clifton Crawford in the 
Spring and Summer revue, which he is to 
present at the Cohan & Harris Theatre in 
June, and which he plans to continue 
throughout the Summer. He baa already 
placed under contract Grace La Bue and 
is making an effort to secure William Rock 
and Frances White. The revue will be 
called "Some." Ray Goetz is making the 
American version. 

MOL1NE THEATRE FOR SALE 

Molire, HL, March 31. — The Moline 
Theatre, at Third Avenue and Sixteenth 
Street, has been placed on the market by 
the Chamberlain and Kindt interests. De- 
velopment of the district as a factory center 
and location of business interests several 
blocks south are given as reason for the 
sale. The theatre was never a paying in- 
vestment and in recent years has been 
open few nights in the season. 



STRAND TO HAVE ANNIVERSARY 

During Easter week the Strand The- 
atre will celebrate its third anniversary. 
The house was opened to the public April 
11, 1914. Manager Edel is making elabo- 
rate preparations for the celebration and 
souvenir programs will be given to each 
patron attending any of the anniversary 
performances. 



HENDERSONS PLAY APRIL 19 

The next performance of the Henderson 
Players is scheduled for Thursday, April 
19, at Chickering Hall, when two one-act 
plays will be given, and Miss Granberg 
will give a pantomime portrayal of "The 
Happy Prince," by Oscar Wilde, with the 
music of Liza Lehmann, played by Homer 
Williams. 



"GENTLEMAN JACK" TO BE GIVEN 
A two-act comedy entitled "Gentleman 
Jack," written by Grace R. Henry with 
music by Rosamond Batchelder, is to be 
presented April 18 and 19 in the Plaza 
Hotel for the benefit of the House for 
Homeless Babies, maintained by the Spen- 
cer Alumnae Society. 



EMMA MAY THAYER OX 

St. Josefs, Mo., April 1. — Emma May 
Thayer, wife of Herbert Thayer, has under- 
gone a serious operation here and is now 
recovering. However, she will not return 
to the road until she has taken a few 
months' rest 



BOLKE SHOW DOING WELL 

Beckerich and Bolke are presenting an 
eighteen-people musical comedy in the 
Middle West, featuring "Creo," Scottie 
Friedell, Harry Lavine and Billy Wallace. 
The show is playing to capacity every- 
where. 



, "NEVER BORN" PASSES CENSOR 

Milwaukee, Wis., April 2. — "Never 
Born" is playing a successful two weeks' 
engagement here. The opening perform- 
ance was witnessed by the city officials and 
passed censorship. 



MOROSCO MOVING OFFICES 

Oliver Morosoo is removing his offices 
from 105 West Fortieth Street to the Mo- 
roeco Theatre. His present suite will be 
occupied by Arthur Hammerstein. 



FRANCES DEMAREST RETURNS 

Frances Demarest has returned to New 
York from French Lick Springs and will 
begin rehearsals shortly in a new musical 
piece. 



MAUDE FAY IN FRISCO 

Saw Francisco, March 30. — Maude Fay, 
grand opera and concert singer, is at her 
home in San Francisco for a brief period. 



COMPANY GOING SOUTH 

The Pastoral Company win set' sail for 
New Orleans this week, where they will 
begin a season in genre plays. 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 



WESTERN OFFICE, 
35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



CHI CM 




FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone RuMph 5€» 



PARKS GETTING 

READY FOR 

OPENING 

NEW FEATURES FOR RTVERV1EW 



ROBBERY PRINCIPALS WED 

James and Lillian Murray, fair perform- 
ers, who were mixed up in the DeWardner 
Hollub affair, were married in Judge 
Crowe's court, last week. At first, the 
judge found them guilty and sentenced 
them for a year, bat, later, be paroled the 
couple and they were married forthwith. 



All of Chicago's principal summer parks 
are getting ready to open about the middle 
of May and are now the scene of bustling 
activity. 

Riverview will open May 16, with en- 
tirely new features. Its management has 
already selected twelve thrillers. Though 
"Battles of Nations" proved its biggest at- 
traction last year, war features will be ex- 
cluded during the new season. An effort 
will be made to reduce the number of con- 
cessions that fall within "game" classifica- 
tion, as they proved the least profitable 
last year. "Hilarity Hall," also known as 
"Bug House," in "Creation Building," will 
be the principal new attraction. 

White City, which followed a successful 
Summer season with an open ice palace, 
ball room and casino throughout the 
Winter, found that the "Revue of Revues," 
a girl show, proved the biggest money 
maker last year and plans a similar offer- 
ing. "The Garden Follies" for the full 
summer season. 

Unlike the Riverview management. 
White City's backers see in the present 
war crisis an opportunity for park enter- 
tainment, provided the question is handled 
from a strictly American patriotic angle, 
and among the new features already lined 
up plans are under way for a super-attrac- 
tion of this order to be featured above all 
other attractions. The opening is set for 
May 19. 

Forest Park will have as its big feature 
Creatore and his band of forty-two pieces. 
The opening date has not been announced. 

AH the park boards have devoted con- 
siderable time to the question of "free 
passes." 

White City will be extremely liberal with 
gate passes, as it aims to "get the people 
in." Forest Park deems it advisable to 
restrict Sunday gratuities, though the cus- 
tomary "daily" books will be distributed. 

Riverview will give out a limited number 
of gate passes, restricting the Sunday 
privilege to a chosen few. An effort will be 
made to conform the distribution of con- 
cession passes to the strength or weakness 
of the offerings. 



PROHIBITION AIDS CIRCUS? 
W. H. Rice, a circus man, in a speech 
at a meeting of the Chicago Dry Federa- 
tion, at the Auditorium Hotel, last week, 
recited figures showing that his circus or- 
ganization did more business in "dry" than 
in "wet" territory. When Seattle was 
"wet" his troupe made $3,120, against $6,- 
710 when "dry." In Portland, Oregon, 
"wet," $3,264— "dry," $8,206. He also 
tried to show that an aggregation gets 
more work out of employees in "dry" 
towns, as men who drink do not accomplish 
much and must be replaced or assisted by 
others. 



"BETTY" AT ILLINOIS 

"Betty," with Raymond Hitchcock came 
to the Illinois, last night. This is the only 
really new show of the week, as "Bunker 
Bean," which comes to the Princess with 
Taylor Holmes, was seen for a long while 
at the Cort, last season. 



BILLY CLIFFORD HERE AGAIN 

Billy "Single" Clifford, formerly in 
vaudeville, is at the Imperial, on the South 
side, with a musical farce entitled "Linger 
Longer Locy." 



SMITH & KAUFMAN'S NEW ACT 

Smith ft Kaufman are getting a new act 
from the pen of Herbert Moore. 



SAVE LITTLE THEATRE 
Only $1,500 more of the $10,000 
originally needed for saving Browne's Little 
Theatre is as yet unsubscribed. The 
owners of the Fine Arts building have 
donated the old quarters, rent free until 
May 31, and the regular program will be 
resumed March 29. 



JACK HAZZARD TO MARRY 

Alice Dovey, filling an important role 
in "Very Good, Eddie," will wed Jack 
Hazzard, part-writer of "Turn to the 
Right," at the conclusion of "Very Good, 
Eddie's" run at the Chicago theatre. 



BIMBO A PATRIOT 

Chas. Bimbo, tramp comedian, baa offered 
his fifty foot cruiser "for the service of 
Uncle Sam in the event of war." Bimbo 
believes his boat would mean the end of 
the submarine menace. 



WILL VOTE ON MOVIES 

The Sunday movie question will come to 
a vote in Oak Park, after Judge Partlow 
denied an injunction restraining the village 
clerk from having the question placed on 
the ballots. 



VINCENT DUSEY SEEKS DIVORCE 

Vincent Dusey, who styles himself "The 
John McCormick of burlesque" seeks a 
divorce from Lucile Ames, with Jack Reid'a 
"Record Breakers," charging incompatibil- 
ity. 



EIGHTH TIME HERE 

When "The Bird of Paradise" comes to 
the Olympic, April 22, it will have been 
the eighth presentation of this play in 
Chicago since it was first produced. 



SINGER SUING RAILWAY 

Ethel A. Staley, a singer, sued the 
Chicago Railways Co. for $10,000 last 
week, alleging that her face was disfigured 
in an auto-street car crash. 



DELMORE & MOORE GO EAST 

Delmore and Moore are headed for New 
York, where they expect to arrange for an 
opening of their new act in five scenes 
over the Loew time. 



NOVEL BROS. FOR CABARET 

The Novel Brothers, "violin clowns," 
may splice in twenty weeks of cabaret 
work in San Francisco between regular 
vaudeville routings. 

BEREZNIAK MOVES 

Leon A. Berexnlak, the lawyer, will move 
into the First National Bank building, 
where he intends to devote all his time to 
"theatrical" law. 



MONTGOMERY RECOVERS 

David Montgomery, co-star of "Chin 
Chin," has recovered from his recent opera- 
tion, at the Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago. 



JOINS "POTASH" CAST 

Josephine Huddles ton has joined the 
cast of "Potash and Perlmutter in So- 
ciety," now playing at the Olympic. 

LOTTIE FOR SOUTH AMERICA 

Lottie Mayer and her divers will be fea- 
tured in a South American tour, next sea- 
son, arranged by Walter Keefe. 



MUSICAL STOCK 

COMPANY AT 

LA SALLE 

BACKED BY COMSTOCK & JEROME 



Chicago will have a permanent musical 
comedy organization, along the lines of the 
old La Salle Opera House stock company, 
if plans now under way materialize. F. 
Ray Comstock and Ben Jerome are back 
of the movement. 

Jerome believes that musical stock, 
modernized to conform to the new revue 
ideas in this form of entertainment, will 
succeed in the Mid-West. He points to the 
long runs awarded meritorious Eastern of- 
ferings brought here. 

For the proper carrying ont of the enter- 
prise it is necessary to secure the right 
house of small seating capacity and a big 
stage. The La Salle is such a bouse and 
also is well situated. 

The shows will be patterned after the 
style of musical show so popular in New 
York. 

Last season Jones, Linick 8c Schaefer 
made an endeavor to "bring back" the La 
Salle as a home of musical stock, featuring 
Una Abarbanell in "Molly and I," from 
the pen of one of the old writers of La 
Salle shows. But the play savored too 
much of parlor entertainment, being plotty 
and almost entirely devoid of chorus. It 
proved a dismal failure. 

Jerome feels that such failures only serve 
to emphasize the success to be achieved if 
the right kind of stock musical comedy is 
started in Chicago. 



PANTAGES TO HAVE HOUSE HERE 

Alexander Pantages is planning the 
erection of a loop house directly across 
from the Majestic Theatre. 



PRINCESS NEEDS HIT 
The Princess Theatre, on lower Clark 
Street, needs an attraction that will pull. 
Oliver Moroseo's "The Cinderella Man" 
folded its tents Saturday night. "Bunker 
Bean," which proved successful at the 
Cort last season, has been summoned to 
fill the gap. In a couple of weeks it 
win give way to "Pierrot, the Prodigal." 

BAYES SHOW CLOSES 

After closing in Chicago last ' Saturday 
night, Nora Bayes, who has her own show 
at the La Salle, went to New York. Pic- 
tures are again being shown at the the- 
atre, Jack Lait's "The Black Stork" form- 
ing the first feature." 



KENNEDY GIVEN CREDIT 

Frauds Kennedy, who introduced 
"Hawaiian Butterfly 1 ' at the Palace 
Music Hall, Chicago, a few weeks ago, is" 
given considerable credit by Feist's Chi- 
cago staff for starting the song in the • 
West. 



CHOP SUEY TO HAVE CABARET 

Several chop suey houses in Chicago 
are now using vaudeville acts for enter- 
tainment. In view of the dearth of 
musical comedy offerings here, chorus 
girls are finding a haven in these places. 



"PASSING SHOW" PASSES 

"The Passing Show," holding forth at 
the Garrick, bids adieu to Chicago April 
8. "Follow Me," with Anna Held, Louise 
Mink, Sylvia Jason and Henry Lewis will 
then hold the boards. 



SEEK AMERICAN ROUTES 

English acts now playing Chicago and 
the Middle West axe seeking long Ameri- 
can routes, because of the submarine men- 
ace and the resulting international situa- 
tion. 



ALSTON DOORMAN AT MAJESTIC 

Joseph Alston has been made outer door- 
man of the Majestic Theatre. 



BAYES' BENEFIT BIG 
A glittering galaxy of stars, including 
Sarah Truax, Barney Bernard, May 
Vokes, Ralph Morgan, Alice Dovey and 
George Kingsberry, did their bit to 
swell the attendance at Nora Bayes* bene- 
fit for the Actors' Fund, last Monday at 
the La Salle. The receipts , surpassed all 
expectations. 

ACTOR AIDS LAW 

William H. Budd, an actor, living at 
the Kaiserhoff Hotel, proved of great 
value in assisting the police to trail the 
suspected murderer of Kathryn Holler, 
the young stenographer whose mysterious 
death formed the subject for many col- 
umns in the dailies. 



RE-SELL EXCLUSIVE STUFF 

Several acts now playing the Middle 
West claim they are victims of duplicity 
uii the part of Eastern act writers. These 
acts find that material which they pur- 
chased under "exclusive" agreements is 
also being used by other acts playing the 
same territory. 

WHITNEY'S AGENT HELD AS SPY 

It has just been learned that the repre- 
sentative of Fred C. Whitney, sent three 
months ago to Vienna for the orchestra- 
tion of "Boys Will Be Boys," has been ar- 
rested on suspicion of being a spy and is 
still interned in Europe. 

HOLMES WITH JONES 

Ned Holmes, who put over the cam- 
Daigns for "20,000 Leagues Under the 
Sea" and "Treasure Island," has been 
engaged by Aaron Jones for the promo- 
tion of "Joan the Woman" in Illinois and 
Indiana. 



BROOKS AIDED ENGLISH 

Because of multitudinous duties per- 
formed in the interest of the English gov- 
ernment, Herbert Brooks, the legerdemain 
artist, has received five. "special privilege" 
passports from Premier Lloyd-George. 



DUNBAR SISTERS QUIT 
The Dunbar Sisters have quit the "Re- 
vue de Vogue," which played local vaude- 
ville theatres. Adele Jaison has been 
engaged to take their place. 

"BIRTH OF A NATION" RETURNS 

"The Birth of a Nation" will return to 
Chicago next Sunday. It will play the 
National for two weeks and then be 
shown at the Imperial. 



HIP GETS CANOPY 

An elaborate steel canopy was recently 
constructed over the entrance of the 
Great Northern Hippodrome. 



CALLAHANS JOIN TAB 

The next edition of Woolfolk's favorite 
tab, "The Junior Follies," will include 
Chuck and Bobble Callahan. 



DAVE B>ZAL TRANSFERRED 

Dave Idzal haa been transferred from the 

box office of the Garrick to that of the 
Chicago Theatre. 



FRED LINCOLN RETURNS 

Fred Lincoln, of the A. B. C. offices, is 
back at bis desk, after a health jaunt to 
Hot Springs. 



AGENCY TO MOVE 

The Irving ft Buchanan vaudeville 
agency will move into the Crilly building 
May 1. 

W. V. M. A. ATTACHES SANTELL 

The W. V. M. A. secured an attach- 
ment against the Great Santell last week. 



MARIE JAMES TO CONTINUE 

Marie James denies the report that she 
is to retire from the agency business. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 





T. B. HARMS COMPANY 
GRANTED INJUNCTION 

Supreme Ccart Restrains Ted Brown 

Music Co. from Using "Somewhere 

■ Voice" Tide 

1 he Supreme Court of Cook County, 111., 
.us issued an injunction restraining the 
Ted Brown Music Co. from using the 
name "Somewhere a Voice Is Calling," 
or any imitation thereof as the title or 
a part of the title of any musical com- 
position. 

The issuing of the injunction is the re- 
suit of a suit brought by T. B. Harms & 
Francis, Day & Hunter against the Ted 
Brown Co. asking for an injunction re- 
straining the Brown Company from pub- 
lishing and selling a song bearing the 
title "Somewhere a Voice Is Calling, Call- 
ing Me Back to You." The Harms Co. 
claimed that the title was an infringe- 
ment of the title of its song "Somewhere 
a Voice Is Calling," and its publication 
and sale would, in addition to damaging 
the sale of Us song, tend to perpetrate a 
fraud upon the public. 

Harrold Rossiter and Ted Brown are 
connected with the Ted Brown Music Co., 
whose principal office is in Chicago, and 
it is alleged the Brown Company planned 
to distribute and Bell a large number of 
copies of the song through the medium 
of the five and ten-cent stores. 

This is the second ease the Harms Com- 
pany has brought in connection with 
■ -«me where a Voice." The first was 
;i ? ;ainst the Werblow-Fisher Co., a New 
Vork music publishing house, which issued 
n song with a similar title, and was all 
ready to launch it on the market when 
an appeal was made to the courts. The 
result was the issuing of an injunction 
and with it the rendering of a legal opin- 
ion which makes it plain that the courts 
will in future frown upon any attempt 
to publish and sell any musical compo- 
sition bearing a title similar to that of 
some established publication. 

"Somewhere a Voice Is Calling" is one 
of the best selling semi-classic songs pub- 
lished in years, it has been featured by 
all the leading concert singers as well as 
hundreds of vaudeville artists, and as it 
is strictly a high-priced number, the 
temptation to issue a song which in some 
way suggests it, and which could be sold 
at a cheaper price, has doubtless been 
strong. The action of the courts in both 
New York and Illinois, however, seems 
to have effectually put a stop to any 
attempt to trade upon the success of this 
well-known song. 

The Harms Company has announced its 
intention of proceeding legally against 
any company or individual which may at 
any time attempt to publish any musical 
composition bearing a title similar to any 
one of its established publications. 



TELL TAYLOR MAKES A RECORD 

Tell Taylor, the Chicago publisher, who 
has been making a trip through the Bast, 
has made a record-breaking trip. The 
sales of his new songs have exceeded his 
expectations in two of the numbers. 
"When Love builds a World of Its Own," 
and "You Have a Wonderful Way," look 
like real successes. 



ART MUSIC INC.'S NEW MANAGER 
Saul Bornstein, the new business man- 
ager of the Broadway Music Corporation, 
is also the general manager of the Art 
Music, Inc. This company was organized 
recently to publish and exploit high-class 
compositions, and is building up a cata- 
logue of compositions from some of the 
best composers. 

EDWARDS OUT OF MUSIC HOUSE 

J. P. (Jack) Edwards, for the past six 
weeks business manager of the music house 
of McCarthy & Fisher, is no longer Con- 
nected with that establishment, having 
sivorcil his connection en Sntnr'.sy. 



ERNEST BALL AT THE PALACE 

A great welcome awaited Ernest R. Ball 
and Mande Lambert at the Palace this 
week. Their act never fails to prove an 
encore winner and on this occasion it is 
replete with a collection of the best songs 
ever offered by this popular composer-en- 
tertainer and his wife. 

Mr. Ball introduces his two latest song 
hits with the happiest possible results. One 
of them is "AU the World WiU Be Jeal- 
ous of Me," a capital little number with 
a good idea set to a well written waltz 
melody. The other is more pretentious 
and certainly appropriate at this time. 

It is a fanciful and dignified story of the 
birth of the Stars and Stripes and is called 
"The Story of Old Glory, the Flag We 
Love." 

Both these numbers are published by M. 
Witmark & Sons. . 



SIX HARRIS SUCCESSES 
Chas. K. Harris has in his catalog at 
present six songs which are attracting 
much attention throughout the profession 
and are selling excellently as well. 

They are "It's a Long, Long Time Since 
I've Been Home," snng by Van and 
Scbenck in the Century Theatre produc- 
tion, Joe Howard's "Love Me All the 
Time," "A Study in Black and White," 
"My Little China Doll," "At the Hula 
Hula Ball," and Mr. Harris' latest ballad 
"You Came. You Saw, You Conquered." 



FRIEDMAN'S NEW POSITION 

George Friedman, one of the best-known 
men in the music publishing field, and for 
the past few years business manager of 
the Broadway Music Corp. is now con- 
nected with the McCarthy & Fisher house. 

Mr. Friedman is general manager of the* 
new firm, and his wide acquaintance in 
the trade as well as bis thorough knowledge 
of the music business makes him a par- 
ticularly valuable addition to the McCar- 
thy & Fisher staff. 



BRICE AND KING SING "ERIN" 

Elizabeth Brice and Chas. King are reg- 
istering a big success with the new "musi- 
cal message from over the sea." "I'm 
Hcarin' From Erin," by L. Wolfe Gilbert 
and Anatol Friedland, published by Jos. 
W. Stern & Co. To many listeners, it 
seems to be the most charming of Irish 
Bongs, but it is apparent to all who hear 
it that it easily ranks well up front in 
the list of Irish* melodies. 



POPULAR JEROME SONGS 

"Billy" Jerome has a number of very 
popular songs in' his catalogue this season, 
and considering the short time he has been 
in business has established an enviable 
record. 

His best numbers are "M-I-S-S-I-S- 
S-I-P-P-I." "Turn to the Right," "There's 
Only One Little Girl," "Come On Over 
Here Ifs a Wonderful Place." and "Some- 
time." 



WENRICH'S SONG POPULAR 

"Silver Bay," Percy Wenrich's new bal- 
lad, is fast becoming popular among the 
singers who made his "Tulip and Rose" 
famous, and the prediction- is that the 
new song will rival in popularity any of 
Mr. Wenrich's big sellers. 

Leo Feist is the publisher of "Silver 
Bay." 



WESLYN WRITING MUSICAL PLAY 

Louis Westyn, of M. Witmark & Sons 
has been commissioned to write a new mu- 
sical comedy for the Harvey D. Orr at- 
tractions. Harvey and Harold Orr will be 
featured next season in the new piece. 



NEW FORSTER PROF. ROOMS 

Abe Olman and Tom Payton are look- 
ing about the theatrical district for new 
professional quartern. The large number 
of people which are daily flocking to the 
Forster oflices makes the moving into 
IftrjrfT «rnarters a necessity. 



TO EXAMINE BITNER'S COIN 

Edgar Bitner takes lunch each Wednes- 
day at Keene's together with a score or 
so members of the Music Publishers' As- 
sociation which holds an informal meeting 
there weekly. 

For the past five or six weeks Bitner 
has been matching coins to determine who 
would pay the check for two or three 
friends and as the result of his luck has 
been getting his lunch for nothing. Two 
of the skeptical ones, who have been get- 
ting "stuck" with remarkable regularity* 
got their heads together last week and 
have decided before matching again to ex- 
amine Bitner's coin, in an effort to dis- 
cover some reason for the wonderful run 

of luck. 



"BROKEN DOLL" POPULAR 

The new novelty song "Broken Doll," 
published by T. B. Harms, has pushed its 
way to the front very rapidly in the last 
few weeks, and a new double version has 
been written for the song, giving unlim- 
ited business possibilities. "Broken Doll" 
is the feature song in Miss Nora Bayes' 
"Two Hours of Song," appearing in Chi- 
cago, and also was rendered by Ellis & 
Bordini at the Palace, New York, last 
week. A natural harmony song and great 
for quartettes, trios and doubles. 



RICHMOND ANNOUNCES PLANS 

Maurice Richmond returned last week 
from a short western trip and shortly after 
his arrival announced his intention of 
branching out in the music publishing busi- 
ness in a large and aggressive way. 

"We have under consideration," said 
Mr. Richmond, "the manuscripts of a num- 
ber of well-known writers and early in 
the Summer will inaugurate a big pub- 
licity campaign in connection with several 
new songs." 



AL LEYTON IN CHICAGO 

Al Leyton has opened offices for the 
Wm. Jerome Publishing Co. in the Grand 
Opera House Building, Chicago, and is 
prepared to demonstrate "There's Only 
One Little Girl," "Some Time," "M-i-s- 
s-i-s-s-i-p-p-i," and "Come On Over Here, 

It's a Wonderful Place." 



CAREY MORGAN'S ONE-STEP 

Carey Morgan's one-step "Hy-Sine" is 
the pet of New York. It is impossible to 
go anywhere without hearing it, but inas- 
much as nobody wants to go anywhere 
without hearing it, that isn't any tangi- 
ble objection. "Hy-Sine" is published by 
Jos. W. Stern & Co. 



FRIEDLAND REPLACES KLUj 

Anatol Friedland, the song writer and 
composer, has temporarily replaced Mel- 
ville Ellis in the Ellis-Bordoni vaudeville 
act Mr. Ellis was suddenly stricken with 
typhoid fever on Thursday and was re- 
moved to the New York hospital. 



SHARPS AND FLATS 

By TEDDY MORSE. 



"It is believed that a new note. has been 
struck There is nothing strident or 
crowded here ; no cacophony or ragtime 
and rivalries ; the objective is to combine 

artistic excellence with commercial de- 
cency: to be businesslike and not bizarre; 
friendly and not frenzied ; rugged and not 
rough!" So runs the announcement of Mr. 
Chas. Miller, eminent composer, arranger 
and critic. More power to you, Charlie ; 
we hope you can get away with it. 



FEATURES VON TILZER SONG 

Lydell and Higgins, one of the first 
vaudeville teams to sing the Harry Von 
Tilzer song "Lonesome" are still fea- 
turing the number, and in a letter to Mr. 
Von Tiber recently stated that it con- 
tinues to be the hit of their act. 



MCKINLEY'S "JAZ" SONG 
Among the many "Jaz" songs beard in 
the cabarets and theatres the new Me- 
Kinley number "When I Hear That 'Jaz' 
Band Play" is prominent. The McKinley 
Co. report a big demand for the song. 



"UKF.l.F.I.F." AT WINTER GARDEN 

"The Ghost of the Dkelele," James 
Brockman's clever novelty song is one of 
the feature songs in the Winter Garden 
production and as sung by Howard and 
Howard is a delight. 



DONKEY TROT CATCHES DANCERS 

Maude Nngent's Donkey Trot promises 
to be the dance sensation of the season. 
It is a big feature at the Cocoanut Grove. 
Dixon & Doyle are using it as their prin- 
cipal number. 



Just to show you there are other ways 
of being successful, even tho' you may 
have started in the music game, comes 
news that Harry Duncan, who once sold 
much music for the Haviland Co., is now 
High Mucky-Muck for the Columbia Shade 
Co. and draws down oodles of money every 
week. Harry ja true to his old love, too. 
He Clippers every week. 



Franklyn Wallace thought the F. W. 
who suggested those titles in this column 
recently was meant for him. He was par- 
ticularly interested in the one called "How. 
are your corns today?" having a Mas. 
home with a title something similar. 



Flo Milett, Herbert Walter, Blanche 
Evans and Jimmie McLaughlin were re-* 
hearsing a song recently in a rather high 
key for their use at the Pekin. "Better 
put it lower," said Walter, "I don't think 
the chorus can dance in that key." 

Bert Kalmar, of Kalmar and Brown, 
must feel relieved when he knows he doesn't 
have to write songs to make a living now. 
But, there on the corner of Forty-seventh 
and Broadway, still shines forth the Kal- 
mer and Puck Music Co. 



The Sun is a busy little thing with the 
lyric writers. "When the sun goes down 
in Dixie," "When the sun goes down in 
Switzerland." Same old sun. It will go 
down anywhere you want. 



Jack Mahoney says the charge for ser- 
vice in the Broadway restaurants is driv- 
ing him away. He opines that if it ever 
gets to the ears of the Automat owners, 
1 they'll be doing it too. 

At last! The present capital of Item 
mania tells the whole story of the Jazz 
movement. Ifs called "Jassy." Yet Solly 
Cohen insists it may have come from "New 
Jazzy!" 



J. Kiern Brennan, poet de-luxe for the 
Witmark Co., need never won; if the 
Muse should desert him. He is one of the 
best entertainers this side of the Golden 
Gate. 

George Little has left New York fiat, 
and hied himself back to Chi.' George's 
"Hawaiian Butterfly" is doing much busi- 
ness for him. 



What a relief. In all the programs of 
the theatres are printed the words of the 
Star Spangled Banner. Now we can all 
sing it 

"Do you know the Bohemian Girl?" asks 
8avoy. "Of course I do," says Brennan, 
"but I'm not speaking to her." 



Bob Miller is hitting high C's in Detroit 
and vicinity for the Feist Co. 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 







GERMAN COMEDIANS ARE 
UNPOPU LAR TH ESE DAYS 

War Situation Leads Audiences to Dislike Their Make-Up, Even 

Though They Like Performers Themselves. 

Hisses in Some Theatres. 



Owing to the international differences 
with Germany, the lot of "Dutch" come- 
dians, especially in burlesque, is not very 
happy these days. 

This is best exemplified by the recaption 
accorded various performers in the houses 
about New York during the past few weeks, 
when a number who have been favorites 
with audiences for years got a repection 
that was. all but hostile. In several in- 
stances' they were hissed at, while at other 
times persons in the audience called, "Take 
them off. We like you, but not your 
makeup." 

This sort of action on the part of audi- 
ences has not alone worried the comedians, 
but the show and house managers as well. 
Some of the latter feel that, upon some 
occasion, the audience will become Incensed 



nt seeing the delineation of the German 
character and might endeavor to injure the 
comedian. 

The show managers feel that the season 
is practically at an end and do not want 
to Change their book or show around for 
the interpolation of another character to 
take the place of the Dutch. 

However, should war be declared against 
Germany, there is little doubt but that snow . 
managers will take immediate steps for the 
elimination of the portrayal of this char- 
acter in their show. 

At the present time in Canada the pres- 
entation of a Dutch character is not per 1 
mitted, for, in several instances, at the be- 
ginning of the war, the feelings of the 
audiences there were freely expressed by 
hissing and throwing missiles. 



BURLESQUERS AID FAIR FUND 

The burlesque world is doing effective 
work in the interest of the Actors' Fund 
Fair. Several thousands of dollars have 
already been raised, and many valuable 
articles have been donated to be sold at 
auction at the burlesque booth. 

Substantial returns have already been 
made by many of the burlesque players, 
the greatest having come from the Misses 
Florence Bennett, Eileen Sheridan, Flor- 
ence Mills, Gertrude Hayes and Martha 
Pryor. Among these the record up to the 
present time is held by Miss Sheridan, 
prima donna of the Merry Rounders 
company, whose collections in Buffalo last 
week reached far into the hundreds of 
dollars. 



MASHER IS ARRESTED 

Simunoiield. Mass., April 2. — Mashing 
show girls received a bad jolt here last 
week when Edward A. Burns tried to force 
his acquaintance upon a member of the 
Parisian Flirts. After standing his in- 
sults beyond the power of endurance the 
young lady reported him to an officer with 
the result that he faced a judge in police 
court next morning upon the charge of 
disorderly conduct. 



SHORT SEASON FOR GARDEN 

Buffalo, April 2. — The stock season at 
the Garden Theatre, which usually ex- 
tends throughout the full Summer, will 
end early in July this year. The contract 
with the A. B. C. provides that the house 
be closed at that time, in order to allow 
for a thorough renovation, in preparation 
for the opening with the American Wheel 
attractions next Fall. 



HOWARD QUITS CAMDEN 

Camden, N. J., March 31. — Tom 
Howard, who has been producing the stock 
attractions at the Temple Theatre for 
more than a year, concluded his engage- 
ment tonight. Next season he will be 
Dutch comedian with "The Darlings of 
Paris," on the American Circuit. 



CHANGES IN SINGER SHOWS 

"Hello, New York," with Lew Kelly 
will close at Hurtig and Seamon's, New 
York, May 26. No definite arrangements 
or engagements have been made for next 
season, and rumors of various changes are 
current Kelly will probably not renew 
his contract with Jack Singer. 



Ml .I.E. BABETTE III. 
While the "New York Girl," on the Co- 
lumbia Circuit, was playing Peterson, 
N. J., week before last Mile. Babette was 
taken ill, and her part was played by 
Francis Botsford, prima donna, and 
Sylvia Brody, soubrette. 

SIGN FOR SUMMER STOCK 

Philadelphia, March 81. — Walter 
Brown, dutch comedian with the Pat 
White show this season, will be one of 
the principals in Bobby Morrow's summer 
stock company. Ruth Bancroft and 
several other chorus girls will slso be with 
the company. 



BURLESQUE FOR BARNESBORO 

The date of Strouse and Franklyn's 
Girls from the Follies for April 10 at 
Barnesboro, Pa., has been confirmed. The 
company will reach that city at 7.80 p. m. 
and the curtain will rise at p. m. The 
manager wires that the town Is fully billed. 

CEBHARDT'S FATHER DEAD 

Tom Gebhardt, assistant treasurer of the 
Columbia, New York, was called to his 
home at Syracuse, N. Y., to attend the fun- 
eral of his father, March 81. 



SOUBRETTE HAS BRONCHITIS 

Boston, Mass., April 1. — Frankie Niblo, 
of the Cherrie Blossoms Company, was 
forced to exclude her brown skinned 
specialty and the lead of numbers last 
week at the Howard Theatre here on ac- 
count of an attack of bronchitis. 



NO EXTRA TIME 

The Puss Puss Co. will not play any 
extra time after the regular season ends at 
Poughkeepsie May 12. Jean Bedini will 
return to New York and begin preparing 
for his show next season. 



J. HERBERT MACK BACK 

President J. Herbert Mack of the Co- 
lumbia Amusement Co. has returned from 
French Lick Springs. 



SISTER ACT RE-ENGAGED 

Lillie Crawford and Nellie Montrose, the 
dancing girls with the Pacemakers this 
season, have been re-engaged for next sea- 
son's show. 



A. B. C. GETS TWO HOUSES 

George Peck, general manager of the 
American Burlesque Circuit, has com- 
pleted arrangements which will include 
the Court Theatre, Wheeling, W. Va., as 
a three-day stand, and the Garden The- 
atre, Buffalo, for a week, for next sea- 
son, on the A. B. C. Route. 



MATT KOLB IN MILWAUKEE 
Matt Kolb closed at the Avenue The- 
atre, Detroit, after producing ten weeks 
of stock burlesque, to go to the Empress, 
Milwaukee, for several weeks, and then to 
open at the Star, Toronto, Canada, for 
summer stock, April 30. He is organizing 
both companies. 

NEW SHOW FOR WATSON 

Billy "Beef Trust" Watson will shelve 
his "Krouaemeyer's Alley" after this sea- 
son, but may produce it in tabloid form. 
He will have a new book for his show and 
is engaging a new supply of shapely show 
girls and ponies. 



CLOSE WITH "SOCIAL FOLLIES" 

St. Louis, March 31. — Stanley and 
Trixie Simons closed their engagement with 
the "Social Follies," on the American Cir- 
cuit, at the Standard Theatre last week. 
Tbey will appear in vaudeville during the 
Summer. 



PRIMA DONNA TO REMAIN 

Pittsburgh, March 31. — Virginia Kel- 
sey has patched up her differences with 
the management of the Academy Theatre 
and will continue as prima donna with 
the stock company playing the house. 

WILL REPEAT AT COLUMBIA 

The Maids of America will play a return 
engagement at the Columbia Theatre the 
week of May 14. The "Bag Dolls in Rag- 
land" and the "Merry Rounders" will also 
play "repeat" dates at this house. 



AIDS ACTORS* FUND 

Through the sale of carnations among 
the audience Florence Mills, of the Bos- 
tonians, added a substantial sum to the 
Actors' Fund at the end of the Hurtig 
& Seamon engagement last week. 

IRENE GOODMAN LOSES BROTHER 

West Haven, Conn., March 30. — Louis 
Goodman, brother of Irene Goodman, died 
at his home here. Miss Goodman was 
formerly with the Watson Beef Trust show. 



BALL WELL ATTENDED 

The employees and patrons of Kahn's 
Union Square Theatre held a ball and 
reception at the Teutonia Assembly 
Rooms which was well attended. 



MARIE NUGENT LOSES MOTHER 

Mrs. Mary Curley, mother of Marie 
Nugent, of the "Cabaret Girls," died at 
Bellevue Hospital last week from pneu- 
monia, at the age of fifty-two. 

PRINCIPALS RE-ENGAGED 

Fred Reeb, German comedian, and Rnby 
Lusby, soubrette, will again be with the 
"Social Follies" on the American Bur- 
lesque Circuit next season. 



WATSON BUILDING SILK MILL 
Patterson, N. J., March 20. — Billy 
Watson has filed plans for the erection of 
a four-story brick silk mill on Vsn Honten 
Street. 



THOROUGHBREDS CLOSE APRIL 21 

With the week of April 21, "The Thor- 
oughbreds" closes its season, playing its 
final dates in Indianapolis. 

EVA LEWIS FOR GRAND STREET 

Geo. A. Clark has secured Eva Lewis 
for the soubrette role in the Grand Street 
summer stock. 



J. H. MACK INVESTS 

President J. H. Mack of the Columbia 
Amusement Co. enjoyed last summer on 
the Shrewsbury so much that he has pur- 
chased an estate at Oceanic, extending 
from the river shore back to Oceanic 
Road. A comfortable dwelling and other 
buildings will help to make the coming 
summer worth living. 

NETTIE NELSON SIGNS 

Phil Ott and Nettie Nelson will work 
together again next season, this time with 
Charles H. Waldron's Bostonians. Miss 
Nelson succeeds Florence Mills, who will 
go with the "Merry Rounders." 

PERFORMERS HELD OVER 

Arthur Pearson has signed up Richie 
McAllester, Harry Shannon, Bill Dotson 
and Maudie Heath to remain with the 
"Step Lively Girls" another season. 

HASTINGS KEEPS THEM 

Among those re-engaged by Harry 
Hastings for next season are Frank Calla- 
han, Annette Walker and Phil Peters. 



JOHN G. JERMON RETURNS 

John G. Jermon is again attending to 
business, after having taking the rest cure 
at his home during March. 

KAHN GETS NATIONAL 

. According to last reports, Ben Kahn 
will install burlesque at the National. 
New York. 



SID GOLD WITH UEBERMAN 
Jake Lieberman has signed Sid Gold 
for his Kessler stock, opening in June. 




Hazel Mack has joined the Pat White 
show. Kitty West also is a new member. 



Loretta Claxton rejoined the Watson 
show this week. 



Dolly Sweet and Russell Hill wiU re- 
main with Lew Talbot's Lid Lifters next 
season. 

Jack Howard goes with the Auto Girls 
next season. 



Barney Gerard is expected back from 
Florida this week. 

The Tourists are filling several dates 
under the title of "The Honeymoon 
GirlB." * 



Myrtle Franks and James Helbert have 
signed for their third consecutive season 
with the Military Maids. 



Barry Melton will remain with the 
Liberty Girls next season. 

Henry C. Jacobs is making a tour of 
inspection in the interests of the J. A J. 
attractions, and Incidentally for advancing 
the Burlesque division of the Actors' Fund. 

HOME INMATES GUESTS AT PLAY 

The veteran actors and actresses who 
live at the Actors' Fund Home were the 
guests of John D. Williams at last 
Wednesday afternoon's performance of 
"Our Betters" at the Hudson Theatre, 
when a party was given in honor of Rose 
Coghlan's fiftieth stage anniversary. 

STAGE CARPENTER DIES 

Daniel Shea, carpenter at the Lyceum 
Theatre, died last week, following an 
operation two weeks ago at a private hos- 
pital here. He was a well-known stage 
worker, having come to New York thirty 
yean ago to become stage carpenter at 
the old Fifth Avenue Theatre. — 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



BARINUM 



STARS 

OF 

THE 



GREATEST SH 



MISS LEITZEL 

The Undisputed Queen oi (he Air 



The Original 

3 Arleys 

World's Greatest Perch Act 
Balanced on the Forehead 



Bird Millman 



M 



"A Fairy on a Cobweb 
The World's Greatest 



PRIDE OF OUR CIRCUS 



Emih 



Eugenie 



SILBON 
SISTERS 

Dashing, Daring, 
Dainty, Musical, 

Teeth Experts 



HERMAN 
POLINE 

Original 

Musical 

Circus Clown 

A First Class Act 



Lupeta Perea 

The World's Greatest 

WHIRLWIND TRAPEZE 
PERFORMER 



i 



MADISON 




QUA 



April 4, 1917 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



BAILEY 



ON EARTH 



STARS 

OF 

THE 



VAN and BELLE TROUPE 

Flying Missile Experts and Boomerang Throwers 



Madison Square Garden, With Barnum and Bailey 



VAIM- 



BURTON 



N. L. GRAHAM 
Presents 



Lady Alice's Pets 

Rose & Curtis — Marinelli-Simon Agency 



Miss Ena Claren 

(Formerly Seldom's Venus) 

Presents Her Creation 
oi 

PLASTIC STATUARY 



'Rite from BethH, Mane" 



HE LEADS THEM ALL 

The World's Greatest Portray er oi 

the Yank 

Alvin (Rube) Green 

Specially engaged feature for New York City en- 
gagement Barnum & Bailey Shows. Home address, 
South Boston, Mass. Exclusive management J. 
Harry Allen, Room 500, Astor Theatre Bldg. 



H. L. KING'S 
BAND 



BELFORD 
TROUPE 

World's Greatest 

Risley 

Performers 







GARDEN NOW 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 




NECKELSON 

The King of Legerdemain 

Just arrived in New York after a triumphant World's tour 
with his first-class act of 

Mysterious and Amusing Feats. Rich Setting. 

Address Woodward Hotel, Broadway and 55th Street, New York. 



SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! 



"IT' S A GI RL" 

LUISE de FOGIE 

IN "RAGGY RHYMES" 
Direction Beehler & Jacobs 



SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! SH! 



SH! 
SH! 
SHI 
SHI 
SH! 
SH! 
SHI 
SH! 



Ann Dar 



In Vaudeville 



DIRECTION (MAS. F1TZPATRICK 



HUGE AS THE ALPS IN CLASS 

THE JIMMIE SHEA TRIO 

Jimnie Shea, Earle Ricltard Harry Donnelly 

Direction, Lee P. MackenfuM 



Vivian 



Lee 



Bert 



Lawrence, Daly and Lawrence 

COMEDY— SINGING AND DANCING ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE ADDRESS— CLIPPER 



DIRECTION MAX HART 



Descriptive Singer of Exclusive and 
Popular Songs 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



AL. TUCKER 

TRICK VIOLINIST 
The Boy With the White Violin 



DIRECTION PETE MACK 



Acrolmttr Ittolut dooms 

Xrcrtitph vaitk nrrlntm at tOrpbeum, Brtroit, tlffa tueck; MtV'tehem, 
Citirago. last iuprk. 



RUTH and DOB 



The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYNN. REPRESENTATIVE 



MARY L. M AX Fl ELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



LINTON and WATSON 

Comedy Talking Act, Entitled 

««Slie Auto Know'* 



FRANKIE FAY 

SINGING COMEDIENNE 



Direction PAUL PURANP 



FANNIE Rnif R 

KEELER — BELIVIOIMX 

"TAKING CHANCES." Direction MARK LEVY 



JOSEPHINE LENHART 



The Diminutive Songster 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



L 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Continued from P«c« ■> 



LOEWS ORPHEUM 

CUat Half) 

Howard and Graf, who opened the show, 
present a balancing act in a novel way. 
The girl's songs are sung well enough for 
the purpose of the act, while the mail's 
balancing feats are skillfully performed. 

Following a current issue of the Hearet- 
Pathe News Pictorial, Merket and Bond- 
hill entertained with an offering which 
wUl be reviewed under New Acts. 

"Bowery Camille," featuring Lottie 
Williams, will also be reviewed under New 
Acts. 

This was followed by a thrilling epi- 
sode of "The Secret Kingdom." 

Faber and Taylor cleaned up with their 
skit, "Going North." The girl has an in- 
dividual "nut" style, and has thingB very 
much her own way. The man gives a 
spirited performance and works remark- 
ably well with the girl. They get a lot 
of fun out of "the joke that will knock 
'em off their seats," and this bit of busi- 
ness is put over with a successful smash. 
The SOng about what will happen one 
hundred years from now is a good selec- 
tion, and is sung as it should be. 

The Creole Band found it easy going, 
making a noise that some persons called 
"music." The "band" consists of a violin, 
bass, guitar, trombone, cornet and flute, 
each vying with the other in an effort to 
produce discord. 

The audience thought President Wilson 
was appearing on Loew time when R. C. 
Faulkner first entered. His likeness to 
the nation's chief executive is remark- 
able. He finds it particularly easy to go 
over in these turbulent times when every 
reference to the flag is a sure sign for 
applause. Hia cartoons are drawn with 
considerable dexterity, and the talk he 
keeps up while making his drawings is 
entertaining. 

The show was closed by Sabbott and 
Wright, a pair of talented dancers. Their 
opening song and dance is very dainty, 
and the rest of their numbers come up to 
the high standard set by the first. H. G. 

OLYMPIC 

(Last Half) 

The show was opened by the Musical 
Christies, a man and girl, who play upon 
the cornet, saxophone and xylophone. 
The act is a fairly good opener, although 
the first selection upon the xylophone is 
played rather carelessly. Either the 
lower keys on the instrument are out of 
tune or the orchestration of the bass has 
been poorly made. 

Wieser and Rieser are a clever man- 
and-girl team with some very entertain- 
ing chatter and an ability to successfully 
put over their songs. The laugh of the 
blackface is very contagious and gets over 
big. The audience warmly applauded 
their offering, 

Winona Shannon and company present- 
ed a sketch which will be reviewed under 
New Acts. 

This offering was followed V-y a Hearst- 
Pathe News film. 

Then came "The Race of Man," which 
will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Whitney and Wilson presented a rather 
diverting act. One of the girls entPTS and 
begins playing a selection ■ - i Itu piano, 
when she is unceren - ..,uusl_, interrupted 
by a voice in the audience which proves 
to lie that of the other member of the 
lean. One of the girls davrvs very well. 
The Scotch number v>>th mch the pair 
close gets over nicely. 

The show was closed by "Circus Day 
in- Toyland." This act, which has pre- 
viously appeared as Jewell's Manikins, is 
i rather stupid affair, for that particular 
style of act belongs to the old school- of 
vaudeville. Although a good act of its 
kind, it finds things rather hard going. 
The day of the Punch and Judy enter- 
tainment belongs in the past.' The mani- 
kins perform cleverly, and the act is well 
put on. 

A feature picture closed the bill. 

H. G. 



EIGHTY-FIRST STREET 

(Last Half) 

If Managing Director Shakman of this 
house would make provision for the check- 
ing of handcuffs it is quite likely that his 
audiences would be more liberal with their 
appreciation of the bills presented. The 
last half bill was one of the best blended 
programs offered in this house for some 
time, but the audience was very sparse in 
its applause. 

The opening turn was Lord and Fuller, 
who present a variety of stunts, including 
unicycle feats, juggling, violin selections, 
dialogue and song. This duo have an 
offering that is nicely arranged, no bit 
being overdone. One is a very acceptable 
opening number. 

In the second position was Mildred 
Grover, a character monologist. She of- 
fers several character songs with the in- 
terpolation of a monologue between 
verses. Her material is just to the liking 
of a woman audience and, consequently 
was well received. 

"The Corner Store," a rural comedy 
sketch, is playing a full week at this 
house. The turn, in almost any two-a- 
day theatre, is a big laugh creator. 

Bill Wells, "The Orator," is rendering 
his monologue at this house for the last 
half. "Billy" seemed to get the audience 
from the start, for, at the termination 
of bis act, they were still clamoring for 
more, holding the curtain on the succeed- 
ing act by their continued applause. 

Lubowska, billed as "the inimitable and 
associate artist," presented the Soul 
Flame, a dance pantomime. Lubowska 
has had a hard time trying to realize her 
ambition to become a featured vaudeville 
"headliner." This vehicle will hardly give 
her the opportunity she is seeking, as the 
pantomime is too long and lacking in 
action, which causes the audience to be- 
come considerably bored. Her work is 
neat, and executed with finesse, bnt there 
is not sufficient of it to make the act 
an acceptable offering for big houses. 

A. TJ. 



DE KALB, BROOKLYN 

(Last Half) 

The Golden Troupe was the feature act 
of this bill and will be reviewed under 
New Acts. 

The show was opened by the Three 
Escardos, who perform somersaults in 
mid-air as well as some other acrobatics, 
all of which are netl done. The trio was 
well liked. 

They were followed by the Two Little 
Days, who depend chiefly upon their phys- 
iques for their success. The man is the emula- 
tion of n string bean, while the woman is 
as fat as a balloon. The first part of their 
act goes over big. The singing in the latter 
part is just passable. The woman plays 
the piano satisfactorily and the man sings 
pleasingly. 

An episode of "The Secret Kingdom" 
was next shown. 

Josephine Davis sang several character 
and novelty songs. She has a voice that 
will please any small time audience. Her 
Italian song stood out from the rest of 
her numbers. The Hawaiian closer was 
also well sung. 

What the playlet of Wilson Franklin & 
Company was all about is a mystery. Be- 
tween a poorly written sketch and several 
of the cast speaking as if they had a bowl 
of mush in their months the audience was 
rather at sea. The leading man has the 
"makings" of a good comedian. He is the 
only thing in the act that is worthy of 
mention. 

Clayton and Lennie take more than 
ten minutes in asking if you've seen Mary. 
Mary who? Merry Christmas. Their linos 
are not a bit clever, and their slapstick 
business saved the act from dying. At 
the end of the turn they sing a song about 
the green grass growing all around, which 
is so old that many Springs have come 
and gone with new green grass since this 
song was written. 

H. G. 



r 



EADLINE ACTS 



] 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANK 



RITA 



McNELLIS and REYOS 

In 'The Waning Honeymoon" 

BY FRED J. BEAMAN— A COMEDY SKETCH CLASSIC 



RUSSELL'S DANCING MODELS 

In a Scenic Dancing Novelty 



Booked Solid 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

TltVfrVIOIMS andTEDDY 

BACK IN TOWN 

Refined Singing, VIolIn'and Piano 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIAM 



EDNA 



EDMUNDS ***!—*-*— LEEDOM 
GOING TO THE WEDDING 



ALWAYS WORKING. I wonder why? - 



Dinettes MAX cordon 



ABSLAM SHARIFF 



"COXEY'S ARIHY" 

DIRECTION MARK MONROE 



Subla pearl 

A Oaurdrrt •pot an ang SHI 
Souring Com lEIrraH Sirrrllnn flUrk Crtnj 



IVfabel Harper 



The Funbeam of Vaudeville 



ELSIE WEBER at the Piano 



•JOHNNY 



A Bma bum th» South. 



CORA 

DIRECTION SAM SHANNON 



ROBERTS, STUART and ROBERTS 

FROLICS OF 1916-17 

BOOKED SOLID-LOEW CIRCUIT REP. SAM BAERWTTZ 



JA.CK. 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EUGENE EMMETT & CO. 

In the Rural Musical Comedy, TOWN HALL FOLLIES" 

RAYMOND FRAZIER. Prfedpal 



EMILIE SISTERS 



DIRECTION 
LEW COLDER 



ETHEL MAE BARKER 

"KUBELK IN PETTICOATS" 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



VAUDEVILLE FEATURE ACTS 



FRANK STANLEY 



IN 



"Where's The Finish" 



Representative 
BERT GOLDBERG 



DIRECT FROM 
THE NUT FACTORY 




Wrocfa.. HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 
U. B. O.— BIG TIME 



Stuart Barnes 



Dir-c tiom MS. E. P LUNKETT 



MARY FORREST 



With AOELE BLOOD AND CO. 



EMMA STEPHENS 

BOOKED SOLID DIRECTION HARRY FITZGERALD 



DAINTY MARIE 

VENUS OF THE AIR 

Wish** to B. Known in Futon Under H*r Own Nan* 

(DAINTY) MARIE MEEKER 



DIRECTION PAT CASEY 



A Different Comedy Act 

ALLEN AND MORTON 

Fool, ; Fiddle and Voice in Fun and Folly 



j 

WORKING FOR U. B. O. 



D1R. CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



The Ysaltos 



Dainty Dancing Duo 

DIRECTION CENE HUGHES. INC, AND JO. PAIGE SMITH 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

Mme DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Dirwction. STOKER * BIERBAUER 



MAZIE KING 



In Her Own Donee Creations 



Direction MAX HART 



MRS. THOS. WHIFFEN 6 CO. 

. AND PEGGY DALE WHIFFEN 

PLAYING U. B. O. TMB 

In "The Golden Night" 



NOLAN and NOLAN 

JESTING JUGGLERS 

Dbwctioo NORMAN JEFFRIES 



THE READES 

Slack Wire JuggBng Novelty 

Direction RAY HODCDON 



THE CLEANEST ACT ON THE BOX 



JOE TOWLE 



LEO FITZQBBALD, "nlijlli 



ARTHUR HAVEL & CO. PLAYMATES 

By WILL M. CRE5SY 

DIRECTION JAMES E. PLUNKETT 



ED. F. REYNARD Promts 



Bi ANC A 



In * Sari** ml 
Dane* P* 



MLLE. BIANCA Promt* 
ED. F. 

REYNARD 

Th. Vsntriloquia] Comadlan, 
In "BEFORE THE COURT." 



CAMILLE PERSONI 

THE "BUTTERFLY GIRL" OF VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS 



Will consider offers for next season. 
Burlesque or production. Two good 
all around utility men. - : - _-. 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



J 



"THE RACE OF MAN" 

Theatre — Olympic, Brooklyn. 
Style— Mutioal novelty. 
Time — Eighteen minute*. 
Setting— Special. 

This act has the possibilities of being a 
successful vaudeville- novelty, but, as it 
stands, much is lacking. 

In back is a velvet drop, split into four 
parts. 

One part rises, disclosing a plantation 
scene. A negro steps out and informs the 
audience what the black men have 
achieved and what they hope to achieve. 
He sings a Southern melody and then 
exits. 

Another part of the drop then rises 
upon a Hawaiian scene. A Hawaiian 
tells the audience of the accomplishments 
of bis people and then sings a number to 
the accompaniment of a steel guitar. 

An Indian scene is next disclosed, while 
a red man tell of what his race has 
achieved. He then renders a solo. 

Next is the Chinaman who has a 
similar routine. 

Finally, the white man appears, the 
superior of them all, and tells of the 
white race's service to humanity after 
which he sings a ballad. 

The five then render a musical number 
with a bit of comedy injected. This 
closes the act. 

The Indian has a remarkably fine voice 
which stands out above anything else in 
the act In fact, hia voice is too good 
for the turn. 

The Hawaiian's number flopped as 
hard as a number can. It waa partly the 
orchestra's fault but mostly bis, for be 
plays with a slipshod, don't care attitude. 

The negro in the act is weak and when 
one stops to consider how musical negroes 
are he wonders why this ' particular fel- 
low was chosen for the act, for his sing- 
ing is very poor. He entirely lacks stage 
presence. 

The white man performs passably and 
! has a strong, pleasing voice for singing. 

The Chinaman possesses the most lik- 
able personality of the five and does his 
bit cleverly. Taking this as a sample of 
his work, he could get over successfully 
with a single. 
;" The lines are weak. Whoever wrote 
'the sketch had an idea which was excel- 
lent but did not know how to successfully 
carry it out. With the lines rewritten by 
a capable writer and with more polish 
put Into the act, the torn should be very 
acceptable. H. G. 

WINONA SHANNON & CO. 

Theatre — Olympic, Brooklyn. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting— Office set. 

There are four persons in the cast of 
this playlet 

The plot may be summed up as fol- 
lows: Cathleen McGonnigal must marry 
one of two cousins by noon or lose the 
money left her in her aunt's will. Cath- 
leen has been a salesgirl at Woolworth's, 
where she is discovered through the 
efforts of the father of Cecil, one of her 
boy cousins. He Is the "silly ass" Eng- 
lish type and the thought of marrying 
him is repellent to her, but she needs 
the money left to her in the will in or- 
der to adequately provide for her 
widowed mother. 

The office boy at Cecil's makes love 
to her and appeals to her Irish fancy. 
She accepts bis proposal of marriage, 
and, when the prospects of getting the 
money in the will look very black, it la 
discovered that the office boy is the 
other cousin. 

The plot will not stand much analyz- 
ing and serves only as a vehicle for 
Miss Shannon to show her particular 
talents. She makes a sweet Cathleen. 

Jerry O'Brien, the office boy, gives 
splendid support. Cecil and his father 
are poor actors. 

The act will interest small time audi- 
ences. H. G. 



ERWIN & JANE CONNELLY 

Theatre — ISushuHck. 

Style — Dramatic sketch. 

Time — Tioenty-tioo minute*. 

Setting — Full stage garden. 

"Sweethearts," by Sir W. S. Gilbert, 
billed as a dramatic success on two con- 
tinents, Is the vehicle presented by these 
two American players in two scenes. A 
period of forty years elapses between the 
scenes which are both in the same set 

The story is one bound to appeal, aa it 
contains heart interest. It tells of a 
young couple who have been thrown to- 
gether and form a heart attachment. 
The boy develops into a man and calls 
to inform the girl be is going to India. 
Her demeanor is cold and distant while 
he tries to impress her with his love. He 
brings her a flower and asks her to give 
him one in return. She hands him a 
plant, while he gives her a white rose, 
which she discards in his presence. 

During the action of the scene she is 
about to plant the seeds of a tree and he 
assists her, saying that probably the 
care of the tree will remind her some- 
what of him. The man then leaves and 
she, remorseful, picks up the flower he 
gave her and tucks it into her bosom as 
the curtain goes down. 

When the curtain rises on the second 
scene, the tree, after a period of forty 
years, develops to be a mammoth "syca- 
more." The man returns to the village 
and the only thing that seems to be the 
same is the site of the girl's home. He 
wonders what has become of the girl. 
A woman well past middle age comes 
from the house and he believes she must 
be the wife of the new tenant. Con- 
versation ensues in which he recalls the 
past, and recognition suddenly follows. 
He, naturally, believes that the woman 
has married, but she quickly dispels his 
belief, telling him that she is still single 
and resides with her nephew in the house. 
Her demeanor has changed greatly dur- 
ing the forty years, she, In all that time, 
having thought of him and blm only. 
They talk of the past and walk off stage 
with the orchestra playing "Silver 
Threads Among the Gold," as the curtain 
descends. A. U. 



"BOWERY CAMILLE" 

Theatre — Loew's Orpheum. 
Style— Plavlet. 
Time— Seventeen minute*. 
Setting — Bpecia I. 

In his attic studio, Ned, an artist, i« 
finding it hard to make both ends meet. 
His greatest comfort seems to be Kit, n 
queer diamond in tbe rough, who cheers 
him on and Is an inspiration to him in 
his work. Ned has wealthy parents 
with whom he has quarreled because of 
his artistic inclinations. He has been 
cast upon his own resources as a result. 

He proposes marriage to Kit. She ac- 
cents and is in such a state of glorious 
ecstasy that the whole world spells only 
Happiness to her. 

While Ned departs on some business 
mission, bis mother visits the studio and 
finds Kit there alone. Ned's father is 
very ill and the mother has come to ask 
him to return home with her. She learns 
from Kit of the engagement, and demands 
that the latter give up her son. Kit 
firmly refuses at first, but when the 
mother shows her how her marriage 
would seriously hurt Ned's future she 
agrees to leave him. 

When he returns to the studio, she 
makes him believe that she has been en- 
couraging his advances to extract money 
from his folks and that she is being 
"kept" by another man. 

He is crestfallen. She pleads with the 
mother to tell him that she has acted a 
lie after years have intervened and he 
has forgotten her. 

This playlet, without the customary 
happy ending, registers a big hit, and 
justly so. Lottie Williams makes a most 
excellent Kit. Her acting is as good as 
any ever seen on Ijoew time. H. G. 



i 



HEADLINE ACTS 



1 



ROBERTS 



CLINTON 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



JAS. B. 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



| APPOINTED BY UNCLE SAM 

JACK 



TOM 



CONROY O'DONNELL 

PARCEL POSTMAN 

DoMvorian Bundle* ei Joy and Packacoo of Lanehtar for tha U. B. O. 

Diction of TREAT MATHEWS Idas and Malarial CoprrUht.d 



HARRY 



DOROTHY 



FABER ™e TAYLOR 



In "GOING NORTH" 



U. B. O. 



W. V. M. A. 



"Nut Comedienne" 

Featured with Menlo Moore's "Miss America" Co. 



A BREEZE FROM THE PLAINS 

NEBRASKA BILL & CO. 



WESTERN NOVELTY ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



GRACIE & ADELE FOX 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



— MORIARITY SISTERS — 

DRESDEN DOLLS OF VAUDEVILLE Direction IRVING SHANNON 

MARINO ^r RICH 

I TALIAN PIANO MOVERS IN VAUDEVILLE 

THE HENNINGS 

Refined Comedy Novelty Offering 

DIRECTION J. P. HARRIS 

BILLY GLASON 



NoroNy -JUST SONGS" Character 



DIRECTION A. J. HORWITZ 



RUTH 

u 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



AND 



JOE 
Direction HARRY PDfCUS 



AND 

IN "A VAUDEVILLE SURPRISE" 

BOOKED SOLID U. B. O. DIRECTION JACK MACANN 

PAUL, LE VAN & DOBBS 

ACROBATIC COMEDIANS IN VAUDEVILLE 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



I 



VAUDEVILLE HEADLINE ACTS 



1 



LA BELLE CARMEN TRIO 

The Best Novelty of the Season 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



"SUM" 



CORYL 



GRINDELL » ESTHER 



nnmrra SOLID IN FUNNY ECCENTRICITIES 



DIRECTION SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



BARRY, NELSON & BARRY 

Entertainers De Luxe 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction, Jo Paige Smith 



BILLY " BETTY 

KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Novelty Banjo Act Now at the Fulton 

Playing Loew Time Direction Mark Lory 



THE NELSON FAMILY 

Vaudeville's Unique Animal Novelty 
RATS AND CATS 



DIRKCTIOM MM • CURTIS 



IRELAND'S FAVORITE SON 

BARRY McCORMACK & CO. 

In "YOU CANT BEAT THEM," by Albert CowU. 

Direction CHAS. FTTZT ATaUCat 



AL 



JOE 



CONRAD ^d CONLEY 

In Vaudeville 



VIOLIN 



«ANO 



SHIP AHOY, BOYS! 



SPILLING THE BEANS 



joe COOPER andH ARTMAN belle 

Direction ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



TOM 



Two Boy* fro m I taJy . 



FRED 

and ARNOLD 

Playfag U. B. O. 



F»AXE FAMILY 

in a High-Claw Musical Act. U. B. O. 

LES VALDOS 

Hindu Hokum 

PETE MACX-CHIEF YOGI 

FISHER & ROCKWAY 

DELINEATORS OF THE SOUTHERN NEGRO 
BIO CHIET-CHAS. BIEEBAUER 

DAVID G. FISCHER & CO. ^SigIUSt^ 

A Chapter from the Pathos of Ignorance 



Ray Lynch Arthur Clay 

* FOR YOUR OWN INTEREST * 

FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 

- 1M A BIG SURPRISE - _ . 

Fred Slater Lew Price 



ERNEST 



MURIEL 



WATTS and RINGGOLD 

GREATEST COLORED COMEDY ACT OF THE AGE 

Direction LEW LESLIE 




VERCE & VERCI 



20th Century Elopement 



Dlroctiaa ROSE • CURTIS 



IRVING AND WARD 

The Button Busters 



DIRECTION BERNARD BURKE 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY & LEWIIM 



IN A 

School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL i EISA MOST 



With M EN LO MOORE 



W. V. M. A. 



u. a. o. 



SAM 



LAURA 



DAVI 



& XA/AL-K 



A Leaaon in Dancing — Norman Jeffariaa 



THE 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 

MARTIANS ° ream ° fmars " 



Special Scenary. ETarrthlnc Original. 



ALL GIRLS 



Darling Saxophone Four 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



ORIGINAL 

THREE MELVIN BROS. 

• Moot SonaaHonol GjmimU CUaaioat Act of Its 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




Im octWr tD avoid mtataaoa mud to Injur, tio prompt cWlrrary of Ik* lattara aslsartlaad 
In this lilt. • POSTAL CARD miimt b* aaat raaiiBaalliia ua to fos-srard roar lottar. It moat 
b. algMd with your foil nam* aaad th. ajililiaee to which tno lattar la to bo (ant. and tba 
Ima of b uau aoaa foUowod by tba sawder ahaasM bo mantlonad. 

PI— a. maatlati th* data (or number) oc tk* CLIPPER In which th* l.ttwra aaat for 



Anger, John 
Bryan Players 
Sort. Castle D. 
Bias. Fred H. 
Balsa-. Earl 
Bsjard. Vk 
CurtlJ, Walter 
Cotter, Wallace 
CaUanan. Walter 
Cut, Henry 
Coleman. Hobl. 
dlirort ft Wll- 

Hss 

dart. Billy H. 
CronlD. Harm r. 
Clifton. Jo*. D. 



AUtMrpe. LUr 
Arm, Trlile 



floftoea 

Bceebey, Sta 

Boree. HaUle 
Barnrtt, Dot 
Baunuui. Irene J. 

Bart, Hn. 
Ball, Blanch 

Kmmtn, Irene J. 



GENTLEMEN 



Dtney. Vincent t. 
DarU, Joe 
Dennj, B. L. 
Denton, Karl B. 
Ennhart. F. W. 
Krani, D. J. 
Earle, Graham 
Emerson. Al W. 
Elliott, Mai C 
Fletcher. E. P. 
rink. Bay J. 
Fercuson, Albert 

C. 
Ferris. Harry 
Casey, Oeo. L. 
Freneb, Henri 



Baron, EUnore 
Bartlea, Ityrtle 
Brown. Mariorte 
Brad. Mlai r. 
Clsraan, Gladys 
Cublne. Kit. 

Chaa. 
Cott. Annie 
Coller. Battle 
Farnworth. Dlr- 

tlna 



OeUI, Alfonso 
Oeotfe, Rudolph 

Hamlin, Hnco 
HowIailO, Oacar 

V. 
Hamilton. Oordoo 



Ulekey. Nell 
Houseman, Un 

H. 
Billiard, B. K. 
Harford, E. F. 
Hutchinson, E. B. 
Hendricks. Bob 

Hawkins. law 
Hamilton, la*. 



Hinckley, W. L. 

Henry, Capt- C. 

D. 
Bkaajaaj Chat. 
Halma a Co. 
Huntley, J. H. 
Hamlin. Hogo 
Harrlniton, E. B. 
Kearney, Jack 
Kemp, Btewart 
Kolb. I. W. 
Lace. B. H. 
Later. Hash A. 
I.jlr ft Harris 
Leonard, Frank 
Lint. H. f. 



Lamb, Aram 
Larerty, Grant 
McDonald, Mai 
Hettler. Ions C. 

liana, wm 

Morrell, Oeo, 



LADIES 



Fldtan. lira. J. 
Fountain. Marl* 
Garcia, Ioe» 
Gordon, Mrs. K- 

w. 

Ooodale, In 

GUmore. Edith 

M. 
Hills. Anoa 
Klek. Kitty 
Belli. Harlot 



Lewis. Blanehe A. 
Uwil. BUIle 
Uomo, Mary E. 



Murray. Miss II. 
McNoU. aba. 
Mayo, VIrlan 
Nlelson. Carla 
O'Keefe, Mrs. 

Tom 
ODonnell. lone 



E. 
Haddocks, Frank 

L. 
McLcoud, Harry 

MeNalr. Jsa. R. 

Naylor. Wo. 
Ntwbart, Ctuu. 
J. K. 



Prllchard. Una C. 
Qulnn. MatUe 
Bussell. Helen F. 
Beld. Helen A. 

Borer. Helen 
St. Clair. Mia 

0. 
Sawyer. Miss lji 

Verne 
Sawyer. Mil. J. 



Ort. Fred 

PrejBo, Albert 
BeUly. Jtl. A. 
Rallud. J. Csl 
rtn 

Siraocts. Dsnny 

Stuyreaut, Dixie 
Sldonlas. The 
Slertrt. Cbal. A. 
Taylor a Coleman 
Tnurmao, Ed 
Verney, Edwin 
Walker, Ed T. 
nullams, Scott 
Woodward, Flor- 

enee 
Young. Le 



Smith. Mabel 
Tanner, Delia 
TrareTB, Lillian 
Wall. Millie 
Weller, Carrie A. 
Washington. 

Fannie 
Wllen. Katbryn 
Woolf, Kathryne 

B. 



PERFORMERS AID BENEFIT 

Ruth Chattcrtou, Elsie Janis, Henry 
Miller, Thomas A. Wise, Aotiole Lee, 
George Arliss and numerous Others ap- 
peared at the benefit performance given 
for the New York Anti-Vivisection Society 
at the Knickerbocker Theatre, Friday 
afternoon. 



HARRIET FORD IN FRISCO 

San FnAwciHco, March 30. — Harriet 
Ford, one of the authors of "The Happy 
Stranger," the present starring vehicle of 
Wm. Crane, is visiting here, having « come 
to attend the opening performance in thi 
city. Monday. 



LYCEUM Mat's. ThuTB. ft 

SEASONS BIG DRAMATIC TRIUMPH I 



ray, Erea. 
Sat. 2.20. 



8.20 



KNIdtfRBOCfwIrR 



THE CASE OF 
LADY CAMBER 



IlHRAIJ^- 

■'Undenloblo 

WOBLD- 

"Popular Buooaaa. 

SUN — 

"A ThriUaT." 



Klaw at Rrlanfer. 



Tbeatiw, B'way tk Sots 
"e Swaau at a.TO ltata. 
Wad. A gat. IM. 

ataaagtn 



NEW M0R0SC0 THEATRE 

ttth ST.. J wet w. of B'way. Phoaa Bryant no 

arraa. MB. Ifata. Wad. and Sat. lit. 
OUwaar Moroaoo'e Orwat aawataal tana with Oirla. 

CANARY COTTAGE 



WITH *""* FBXOABEA. 
Obailos atnaalea aaat Barbart OartbaU. 

jOjT^'gmrtn WeBt IStb 8t., Phona Bryant 46. 

I I IK I Kt.. at 8.20. Mats Wed. A Sat. 

^ , '^'" mm 2.20. OHtot Moroaco'a great 

UUKtllnf ■OC C aa B . oeaaoo'a Oaw aubwcootlal ooeeaaa 

UPSTAIRS S DOWN 

BY FREDERIC * FANNY HATTON 

THEATRE, WEST 46tb HT. 
Brca. at 8.S0. Mata. Wad. k 
Hat. 2.S0. 

J. VHED ZTtOtTJt M AW Fraaaata 

WTtXXAK THOa A. 

COLIRTENAY WISE 

■ • a hwaOAl C CI OCT By 



GEORGE IARLISS 

la J. at BARHIE'B COMEDY 

THE PROFESSOR'S LOVE STORY 

Hon.. April S 1 ARilflS la "TtlHUATCT.T " 

Cohan & Harris ™- -" 

vvuuuuuuiiiiy CaU Bryant «a<s 

Ewaa. 8.20. Uata. Wad. * Bat. at «.S0. 

COHAN ASS gJUll praaant 

"THE WILLOW TREE" 

A FANTASY OF JAPAN. 
By Hanrlmo and Harriaon Hbodea. 

EIU B f D gT B'way, 40 St. Bra. s.SO 
1T ^^»JLfVSLJ I » , «- Wa n. A 8 at. 2J0 
CHAKLES rROHBL&H FABBEKIB 

A KISS 

FOR 
C I NDERELLA 



MAUDE 
ADAMS 



FULTON 



1. af. BABBUrs QR1BATEBT TRIDafl-ll 




&A"~PALS FIRST %J» t 
REPUBLIC EH5.5?* ""■■ 

JANE COWL ElTIN<JE 



B. F. BJUTU'S 

PALACE 

Hroailway A 4Tth Bt. 

Mat. Bally at 3 P. at. 

28. 80 and 75c. 

Bvary niibt 
25-BO-7541.fl.S0. 



XAT IRWIN, MARK'S 
JUNGLE LI01IB. IAM 
BERT A BALL. "THE 
rotTB B-rrSBAMDe.' 
BEBT BAYOY * JAY 

BRENNAN, HENRY B. 
TOOKKB A 00. in "THE 
HXABUNERfl.". JOE 
COOK, LOUTSE A 8TER- 
XJHO, "PATH LA." 



in "LILAC TIME" 

HUDSON 1b&Ji*3r »•"• 

Ettato of Honry B. Harrla, Xaaasar. 
JOHN B. WTTT.TAafB Pi oaa aU 

Tha N.w Threa-Act Cbtnady 

"OUR BETTERS" 

fjw H, SOMERSET MAUGHAM 

HIPPODROME 

MAKAOB9IENT CBABXBB DII.IJNOH AM 
Nlflbta at 8.1B. Mat. every day, 2.18. 
"THE DIG SHOW" 

STAGED BT B. B. BDBNBIBB. . 

i£5BS&> KELLERMANV 

ABB RETURN OF CHARLOTTE 
NBW ICB I MAMMOTH I 100 NOVELTIES 
BALUbT I UINBTBBgLS I 1000 PEOPLE 



THEATRE W. 42d St. Bra. at 8.S0 

Mata. Wad. ft gat. 

A. H. WOODB preoen ra 

last two weeks 

CHEATING CHEATERS 

By MAX MARCIN. 



GAIETY 



THBATRB. B'way ft ittl- 
St. Bvea. at 8.20. Uata 
Wed. A Sat. at 2.20. 
WIMUHELL smith and JOHN L, golden 

__^ Freaent tba aeaaon'a ncma 

TURN TO THE RIGHT 



By Messrs. Smith and Hasaard. 



sT'mi^Ai&cs BWAY * <M8T - " 8 ™-«'- 2 --' 

tUHAIM 3 Mata. Wed. ft Sat. 2.28. 

EXAW ft BBLANOBB atanaarera 

ITBNBY MIIJ.ER preornta ~*™ lr " 

RUTH CHATTERTON 

^~2Sl2!S a 2!2 r jJ^!!!£} D * ft9"> afeBao. ta 
"COME OUT OF THE KITCHEN 



WASN'T 



LONESOME 1 



A tvpic'ii All„.rl V.oii'T-iUit liov'rll'v soni:.' I In- ',/->! -ii!.:<- IiVj 



\V li|<()\V> .,ml 



CI IAS. M.CARRON- 



HITS YOU ALL KNOW ABOUT 

DOWN WHERE THE SWANEE RIVER FLOWS' 
PUT ON YOUR SLIPPERS. AND FILL UP' YOUR "PIPE' 
■OH.. HOW SHE COULD YACKI HACKI" 
DOWN IN HONKYTONKY'tOWN" 



BROADWAY MUSIC CORPORATION 

WILL VON TILZER. President 

1 45 W. 45th St., Now York City 145 N. Clark SU Chicago. III. 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 






VAUDEVILLE HEADLINE ACTS 






BETTY FIELDS 



Booked Solid 



MMba LOU EDLEMAN 



IRVING BLACKMAN 



MURRAY WESTON 



GEORGIA COMEDY FOUR 

DIRECTION JACK FLYNN 

Bookad Solid U. B. O. TTm« 

HARRY SINGER CARL BERNARD 



THE THREE ROZELLAS 

A Classy Musical Oddity 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction ARTHUR HORWTTZ 



Fisher, Luckie & Gordon 



DIRECTION ROSE & CURTIS 



JOHN 



JOHNNY 



MARTIN and ELLIOTT 

"THOSE FASHION PLATE DANCING BOYS" 

Direction MARK LEVY 



DAINTY QUEEN OF SENSATIONAL RHYTHMIC GRACE 

LA PETITE MERCEDES 



A GORGEOUS DISPLAY OF NOVEL RICHNESS 

Dlnction ARTHUR J. HORWTTZ 



Thomas & Henderson 

The Black Steppers 

WATCH THEM IN VAUDEVILLE 



The Boy Who Came Back 

In a New Act by Allan Spencer Tennejr 
ASK MY AGENT 



ALICE FARRELL 

In Vaudeville 

SINGING DANCING VI0UN1STE 



FLORENCE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction MARK LEVY 



L-IL.L- 

In 5 Feet of Sweetness and a Violin 



PLAYING VAUDEVILLE 



THE THREE ARLEYS 



BARNUM A BAILEY CIRCUS 



AUL. DURAMD 



O'BRIEN & KING 

(Formeriy O'Brien St Epmar) 

In THE NEW PIANO PLAYER 



BOB RUSSAK 
Presents 

THREE SYNCOPATORS 



SMITH 



LANG 
Direction GLADYS BROWN 



NOMOU 



FREDERICK H. SPEARE AND CO. 

Offer the Novel Comedy Sketch Hit, 



66 



NOW HEADLINING LOEW CIRCUIT 



•» 



REPRESENTATIVE LOUIS WESLEY 



JOHNNY SINGER 

===== AND ========== 

DANCING DOLLS 

IN VAUDEVILLE AARON KESSLER, REPRESENTATIVE 



JAS. E. 



ED. F. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



•IIM 



c. 



COVENEY & WOODROW 



The Precedents of Vaudeville 




ANDERSON & EVANS 

PRESENTING THEIR NEW ACT 

"THE WANDERER" 

PILOT— I. KAUFFMAN 



KATHRYN Ml LEY 

"Nature's Own Comedienne" 

In Vaudeville 



Three Norrie Sisters 

Singing, Dancing, Novelty 

New Act In Vaudeville 



JACK WALTERS & CUFF SISTERS 

WORKING 

Dan Dix & Virgil 

WITH STAMPEDE RIDERS 



EDDIE 



AND 



MONKEY SHINES— IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOB 

>F 

Direction of MAX LANDAU 



ED E. and BIRDIE CONRAD 

In a Vaudeville Oawique by ED E. CONRAD 



bob-KELLEY & CATLIN-fflo 



TkcflfKTll 



THOSE NATURAL COMEDIANS 



April 4. 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

TCW YOEK CITY. 

Palace— Gertrude Hoffman — White ft Kavaoaugh 
—Elisabeth vomr. (s to on.) 

ysiiyal Delay Jean — Burlington Poor— Arthur 
Sullivan * Co.— Frsnkle Heath— Chlyo * Ctilyo— 
Stuart Barne*. 

Colonial— Sfcarrocss— Klrby ft Borne— Oyer ft 
Faye — Two Carlton* — Poor Entertainers. 

Alhambra — Scotch Lade ft lassies— Gerard ft 
Clark — Brighton— J. Warren KeuM — Bock ft 
White — Gay lord ft lancton — Bernle ft Baker. 

Riverside— Four Husbands— Nan Halperin — Re 
sal ft Bender — Howard ft Clark— Apdale'a Anl- 
ro«U— Wataoo Slater*. 

BROOKLYN. 

Buahvrlek— Three Soltys— Allen ft Howard- 
Valerie Bercere Co.— KlUmara Jape— Will Morris 
aey — Santley ft Norton — Genevieve Cliff A Oo. — 
Diamond ft Granddaughter — "Vacuum Cleaners." 

Orphanm— Saatley * Norton — Wllla H. Wake- 
field— Labia ft Sterling— Donley ft 8tles— Neablt 
A Clifford — Nina Payne ft Oo. — IJbooettl — Mr». 
Thomai Wbiffen. - ■ - 

ATLANTA, Oft. 

rersyth— "At the Party"— Will Oakland— Bath 
Bndd— Lew 8lst*r*— AL Hhajne. 

B08T0H. MASS. 
Keith's— Hlcsey Broa.— Lillian's Doge— Brlce ft 
King— Ward ft Van— Mclntyro ft Heath. 

BUTTAIO. N. T. 

ghaa'a Rath Broa. — "Pettteoate" — Russell Ward 

A Co. Bddle Leonard ft Oo. — Lelgbtners * Alex- 
ander— Featon ft Green. 

BALTIMORE, MB. 
Maryland— Bran B. Fontaine— "Cranhentea" — . 
Pcni * Davie— I'lntle-^lJimbert ft Ball. 
' CINCINNATI. OHIO. 
Kaith'a— laaper— Page, Hack ft Mack— Three Du 
rorBoyTSirr, Green ft Co.-"Glru*e > Gambol." 
CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

Keith'*— Brltt Wood— McCarty A "WiliL 
kawa Jen*— Bet*. T. H*lnee— -FrancI* ft Roea— 
Montgomery * Perry— "Creation"— Toot. Fake * 

OHATTANOOGA, TENS. 
Kaith'a (firat n»lf> MarahaU Montgomery— 
Morln Stater*— Diving Nymph*. (Lest H.lt)- 
Van Bergea ft Ooaler. _ 

COLUMBUB, OHIO. 

Keith'*— Kelly ft Wilder— Aaahl Troope— Max- 
mlUan^.^Degi^Helen Page ft Co -Crlap^-Wn. 
Aug— Oallfarola Boya' Band— Wm. Eh*. 
DAYTON, OHIO. 

Keith'*— B*dle ft Banwden— Sophie T ™* e r-**' 
dell ft Higglne— Lelpalg— Caraon Brother*— 
Br.rgk'a Models. 

DETROIT. MICH. 
Temnle-Yrette-SeTeD Brocge-Salle * Monde 
_C.Pt: Anion ft Co.-"Five of Clube"--'Bobe- 
vllle"— King ft Harrey— Harry Holman A Co. 
EBTE, PA 
ColonUl-J. ft M. Harklne-EmlUe Slater*— Dabi 
ft Omen— Bd. DowUng— MiryUnd Singer.. 
GRAND BArlDS, MICH. 
Bmprea*- Adelaide Boothby ft Co -0"^."- 
Bosener-Dslnty Marie-David Sanerateln-Chie. 
Abearn Co. — HoU A Dork—. 

HAMILTON. CAN 
Tample-Pensollo Slatera-Cole. RUMell ft DlTla 
-Imperial Troupe-BockweU ft Wood-Mln.rra 
Courtney ft Oo. 

INDIANAPOLIS, HID. 
Grand— N*l*on Wiring— Puck*— Aeon Pour- 
Bert Melroee— 8. Loyal Co. 

KNOXVILI.E, TEHH. 

Bijou (Pint Half)— Vin Bergen ft Ooaler. 
(1-sst Half)— Marshall Montgomery— Morln Sisters 
— Diving Nymph*. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Keith'*— Walter Brewer— Primrose Four—pan 
Borne A Olri— Clara Howard— Wilfred OUrk ft 
Co.— rantlno Troop*— Clifford ft Willi. 
MONTIir— L, CAN. 
Orphan—— Knapp ft Cornelia— Ionia Hardt— B. 
ft O. Dooley— John B. Hymer * Co. 
X— OVXDZ— OS, — . I. 
Kaith'a— Bene* Floringy— Ftanklyn Ardelle Co. 
— Sallle Fisher — Savoy A Brennan— Van Cleve A 

Pete Jaa. C. Morton ft Co. — Emily Ann Wellman. 

PITTSBURGH, FA. 
Dart*— Oscar Lorraine— Spencer ft William*— 
Pay Templeton— Bra Tangnay. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Keith's Bensee ft Balrd— Lewla ft White — Jo* 

Towle — Hale A Pa teiaon— Forest Fires— Mack A 
Walker— Craig Campbell— GlUusmltl. 
BOO— E8TEB, N. Y. 
Temple— HaUen A Hunter — Chip A Marble — Sea- 
bury A Price— Four Reading*— WMtfleld ft Ire- 
land—Bradley ft Ardtne-r-Grice De Mar— Duraln's 
Anlmala. ___ 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith'*— Median's Doga — Dunbar's Darkles — 
Laurie A Bronson— Belle Baker — Brna-Antonla 
Trio — De Pace Opera Co. — Macart A Bradford. 
TORONTO, OAK. 
Shei'i — Moran ft Wiser — Swor ft Arery— Shan- 
non * Ann]* — "Night Boat"— Connelly Trio— Lil- 
lian Shaw— Ward ft Cullen — Gordon Highlanders. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Keith'a— Ma—— Bonconl — Ushers — Travilla 
Brothers ft Co. — Bennett ft Blchardfr— Jordan Glrla 
— May Irwin — Florence Moore A Co. 
Y0UNG8T0WN, OHIO. 

Keith's A. A. P. Steadman — Marine Brother. A 

Borden — "Girl with 1,000 Bye." — Jaa. H. Cullen 
—Beatrice MoreUe Six— Mrs. Gene Hngbes— Fay. 
Twc Coleya A Fay*. 







ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Majestio (First Half)— Hyam* ft Mclntyre — 
Blovoom Seeley A Co. — "Age of Reason" — Mme. 
ChUson Ohrman— Chaa. T. Aldrlch— Burdell. Pat- 
terson — Roger Grey ft Co. 

Pa— a* (First Half)— Eddie Foy ft Family— 
Bills ft Bordonl— Bert Biker ft Co.— McKiy ft 
Ardine — Brennan ft Powell — De Witt, Bams A 
Ton— ce — Ollle Young ft April. 

CALGARY, CAN. 

Orphean — Belle Story — Clayton White ft Co. — 
Johnston A Harty — Bert Kenny— Barry Olrls — 
"The Recital." 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphan— — Dorothy Jardoo— Hallen A Fuller — 
Corbett, Sbeppard ft Donough— Wheeler ft Rolen 
— Pat Barrett — Better Broa. — Beatrice Herford. 
DULUTH, MINN. 
Orphaam — Both St. Denis ft Co. — Donahue ft 
Stewart — Marlon Harris — King ft King — Josle 
O'Meer*— Jnlle Rims A Co. 

DEB MOINES, IA. 
Orphaam— Creasy ft Dayne — Wm. ft Margaret 
Catty— Benny ft Wood. — Harry — Mason— Sam 
Roff ft Sonla — Boy Harrah Troupe — Loon a Sisters. 
KANSAS CITY. HO. 
Orphean — Adele Blood A Co.— In—off, Conn A 
Coreene — Han* Hanke — Maurice Burkhart — How- 
ard'a Animals — Wallace Calvin — Rials A Wltchle. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Orphaam— Lew Dockstader— Geo. Kelly ft Co. — 
Bert Leslie A Co. — Bmbs A Alton — Estelle Went 
worth— Natalie Alt— Moore. Gartner ft Rose— 
Misses Campbell— Rita Mario Orchestra. 
LINCOLN, HEB. 
Orphanm- Harofco Onnkl — Claude OUllngwater 
ft Co.— Tho*. Swift ft Co.— Maria Lo— Meredith ft 
Snooier— Ryan ft Lee— Am ea ft Wlngthrop. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orphaam— Phyllli NaUson Terry— Milt Collin*— 
Adair ft Adelphi — Herbert Clifton— fiTmeraon ft 

Baldwin. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orpha nm - Grace La Bue — Muriel Worth ft Co. 
— Jaa. 0. Morton ft Co.— Mr. ft Mr*. Cappelln — 
Marie Stoddard — Martlnett! ft Sylvester— Silver A 
Dural — Flying Henrys. 

MEMPHIS, TEHH. 
Orphanm— Mason ft Keeler Co.— Stone ft Kallai 
— The Volunteers — Kltner Hswksley A McClay — 
George Lyons— J, ft W. Hennlngo— Mario ft Duffy. 
HEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orphanm — Gua Edward*' Bandbox Bene — Julias 
Tannen— Harry Glrard ft Co.— Frances Kennedy- 
Harris A Minion. 

OMAHA, NEB. 
Orpheam — Orrllle Harrold— Geo. Naeb A Co. — 
Footer Ball A Co.— Henry Keens A Co.— Witt A 
Winter. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

Orphanm— Linne'e Dancing Girls— Palfrey, Hall 
A Brown — Ethel Hopkins — The NorvaDea — "The 
Cure" — Cross A Josephine. 

PORTLAND. OHE. 

Orpheam — Seven Honey Boya — McWitten ft Ty- 
son — "Garden of Aloha" — Alice Lyndon Doll A 
Co. — La Gracloaa — Una Clayton ft Co.— Artie 
Mehllnger. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Orpheam— Louis Maun ft Co. — Avellng ft Lloyd 
—Bra Taylor ft Co.— Marlon Weeks— Willing ft 
Jordan— Vallecita'a Leopards— Lambert ft Fred- 
rich* — Australian Creightoae. 

BAH FRANCISCO, CAL. 
. Orphanm — Mme. Jomelli — French A Els — 
Hlrachel Hendler — Chaa. Qrapewln ft Co. — Medlln. 
Witts ft Townee— Knllervo Broa. 

SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AND FBE8H0. 

Orpha nm ' C lara Morton — "A Double Exposure" 
— Lydia Barry— Brent Hayes— Whiting ft Burt— 
Newhoff A Phelpa. 

BT. PAUL, MINN. 
Orpheam— Dorothy Shoemaker ft Co.— EMM 
Sisters — Frank ft Toble — Boyle ft Brown — Jimmy 
Hnasey ft Co. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orpheam — Cecil Cunningham— Edwin Arden A 
Co.— Chung Hwa Four — Gould ft Lewla— The Her- 
rena — Marmeln Siatera — Togan A Geneva. 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Orpheam— Morgan Dancer* — H. & A. Seymour — 
Caltee Bros. — Walter Weema — Evereat'a Monks — 
Bice, Elmer ft Tom — Flanagan ft Edwards. 
VANCOUVER, CAM. 

Orphaam — Hermlne Shone A Co. — Ashley A All- 
man — Ethel MeDonongh — Wright A Dietrich — 
Olivetti Moffet ft Clair— Billy Klnkald— "Tate's 
Motoring." 

WINNIPEG, CAH. 

Orphaam — Le Boy. Talma ft Boaco— Jane Court- 
hope ft Co. — Ben Deely ft Co. — MiUleent Hower— 
Gildo Bandegger. 

W. U. B. O. 

BAT CITY. MICH. 

Bijou (First Half)— Harold Yaraa— Mlddleton ft 
SpeUmeyer — "Lingerie Shop" — Jack Bailey— Royil 
Toaio Troupe. 

PAB VILLE. TT.T,, 

Palaee (Pint Half)— The Olmsteads— Brooke ft 
Bowen — Oracle Emmett ft Co. — OUT* Briscoe — 
sistko's Mldnlte BoDiekera. (Lea* Half]— Beze— 
Mullen ft Coogan — Mr. ft Mrs. Norman Phillips— 
Gsutler's Toy Shop. 



FLINT, MICH. 
Majeitio (First Hair) — Transueld sisters — Harry 
ft Myrtle Gilbert — Wm. Armstrong ft Co. — Green 
A Pugh— Fred'k Bower, ft Co. (Last Half)— The 
Bimbo*— Grace De Winter* — Hoyt'a Minstrels — 
Wood, Melville ft Phillip*— Princess Kilimi ft Co. 
IT. WAYNE, HID. 

PeJaoe < First Half) — Kawana Broa Wanner ft 

. Palmer — Gladys CorreU— Mr. ft Mrs. Norman Phil- 
lips — Ray Samuels — Ned Nestor ft Sweethearts. 
(Laat Halt)— The Olmsteads— stein, Hume ft 
Thomas — Holmes A Welle— Lona'a Hawaiian* -Sen. 
Francis Murphy — Bayno'i Boll Doga. 

INDIANAPOLIS, DTD. 

Ly r lu Paul Pedrtnl — Both A Roberta — The Ex- 
plorers— Guerro ft Carmen — Ko-Ko Carnival Co. 
} ACKBON, MICH. 
Orpheam (First Half)— W1U ft Ktmp— WllUson 
A Sherwood — Freeman Dunham A Oo. — Barry Hlnes 
—"College Girl Frolics." (Laat Half)— August A 
August — Cerro — "On the School Playground" — Bill 
Robinson — Dancing Kennedys. 

KALAMAZOO. MICH. 

Majeatu (First Half)— "Maid to Order." (Laat 
Half) — Boa* Broa. — Silber A North — Madam Marion 
A CO.— Sherman. Van A Hyman— "The Colour 
Genu." 

LANSING. MICH. 

Bijou (First Half)— Boss Broa.— Silber ft North 
— jja gM* Marlon ft Co.— Sherman. Van A Hyman 
—"The Colour Gems." (Last Half) "Maid to 
Order." 

LOOAHSPORT, IND. 
Broadway (First Halt)— "Mr. Inqnlsltlve." 
(Last Half) — Harry La Toy — "The Tamer" — 
Brook, ft Bowen. 

MTTBKEOON. MICH. 

Regent (First Half) — John Hlgg^ur— Vera Ber- 
liner; — "The Tamer" — Jimmy Loess A Co. — Prince- 
ton Fire. (Laat Half)— Kawana Bros. — Winter ft 
Palmer— Canon ft Willard— Panllne Saxon — "Gar- 
den of Mirth." 

SAGINAW, MICH. 

Jeffen-Straad (First Half)— The Bimbos— Ones 
De Winters— Hoyt's Minstrels— Wood. Melville A 
Phillips — Princess Kalama A Co. (Laat Half)— 
Transtleld 81sten— Harry A Myrtle Gilbert— Wm. 
Armstrong ft Co.— Green ft Pugh— Fred'k Bowen 
A Co. 

S. sfc C. CIRCUIT 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
Empress — Rice A Newton — Flood A Brna — Hlatt 
A Geer— Don ft Patty— Five Novelty Mlnetnl*— 
Harms Trio. 

DETROIT. MICH. 
Mile* — Stlcknay'a Anlmala — Holme* ft Holllston 
—"Honey-Moon Isle"— Lane ft Harper. 
FAROO. V. B. 
Grand (Flnt Half)— "Girl From Starlend"— 
— Relff ft Mumy— Hiael Leoni— "To Save One 
Olrl"— Richard the Great. (Laat Half)— Jule, 
Jane ft Lewis— 8. Miller Kent ft Co.— Zemiter ft 
Smith— Mr. ft tui, Fnnk Cassd. , 

MARON CITY. IA. 
Cecil (Pint Half)— The Kellogga— Wolfe A za- 
delll. (List Hllf)— Leonard A Dempsay— Callahan 
A Callahan. _ __ 

MAR8HAIXT0WX, IA. 

Casino (List Hllf)— Edith Mote— Nettie Carroll 
A Co.— Keene A Forwortn— Two Jewells— Four 
Collnli. - 

BT. PAUL, MINN. 

Hippodrome (Flnt Half)— Zemiter * Smith— 

Wyndbsm A Moore — Anderson Duo — Joe Wnlteneld 
—Melrose. (L»st Half)— Joe ft Vera White— Folly 
sisters A Le Hoy— Hobsoo A Beatty— Richard the 

Oreat. 

BT. CLOUD, MINN. 
Memo (One Day)— Richard the Great— Jule, Jane 
A Lewla— "To Save One Girl"— Hasel Leooa— 
"Girl From Starland." 

W. V. M. A. 

ALTON, ILL. 

Hippodrome (Pint Half)— Banvard sisters— Mc- 
Leilan A Genoa. (Last Half)— Julian Hill. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Kedxio (Flnt Half) — D'Aroore A Dooslas — Me- 
ConneU A Simpson — Carson ft Willsrd— Colonial 
Bellea. (Lait Hllf)— Gallartnl Sisters— Jamea 
Gndy A Co. — Cook A Lorens — Mn. Eva Fay. 

Windsor (Flnt Half)— "He's In Again." (Laat 
Half) — Carllta ft Howland— Archie Nicholson Trio 
—Ward A Rymond— Baiter Sisters. 

Academy (Flnt Half)— Dave Vanneld and Co. — 
Dawson and Dawson— Mareena. Nevaro ft Mareena. 
(Laat Half)— Thompson, Benedict A Livrrence. 

Avenue (Flnt Half)— Archie Nicholson Trio— 
Jamea Grady ft Co. — Mason A Mumy. (Last 
H.U) — Flndera Keepers — Curley A Welch— Frank 
Stafford ft Co. 

Wilson (Flnt Half) — "Floden Keepers" — Fred 
Sosrnan— Bert Levy. (Last Half)— Mitchell A 
Mitch — Bert Levey — Patrlcota A Meyen. 
BUTTE, MONT. 

Empress (Flnt Half) — Scamp A Scamp — Henry 
A Moore — Musical McDonalds — "La Mont's West- 
ern Daya" — Pollard — Fenner ft Tolman. (Last 
Half) — Anita Arties ft Co. — La Vere A Palmer— 
Kublick— Cathryn. Chaloner ft Co.— Skatells— Ward. 
Bell ft Ward. 

CEDAR RAPID8. IA. 

Majeatio (Flnt Halt) — Millard Bros. — aallarlnl 
Sisters— Kelly ft Fern — "Petticoats"— Coakley ft 
Dunlevy. (Last Half )— "The. Night Clerk." 

DULUTH, MINN. 
Grand (Flnt Half)— Mennetti A Sldelll— Bllnore 
Sherman — Claire Hanson ft Village Four — Paul 
Kleist ft Co. (Last Half)— Adolpha— Nora Kelly 
A Co. — Canfield ft Barnes. 



BAST ST. LOUIS, Has, 
Erban (Pint Half)— Y waxy— Sidney ft Townlay 
—Jamea Thompson ft Co. — Gordon ft Blee*. (Last 
Half)— Banvard Sisters— Al Wohlman ft Co.— 
"Little Mlaa Up to Date." 

IDBT DODOE, IA. 
Prinosaa (Pint Half) — Frawley and Want— 
Gladys Vance — Orpheus Comedy Four. (last Half) 
—Harris and Nolan— Mr. ft Mr*. Melbaro— Dave 
Roth— Lunette Slater*. 

FORT WILLLAM, CAH. 
Orphaam (Last Half)— Cook ft Bothert— Dot 
Marvell— Putnam ft Lewla— Mont. Carlo 8ext.tte. 
JOLIET, ILL. 
Orpheam (Last Half)— Geo. ft Lilly Garden— 
Hahn. Waller A Marts— Harry Bereeford A Co. — 
Dickinson ft Deagon — Hippy Harrison ft Dyma- 
mlte. 

UHOOLjr, NEB. 
Orpheam— Degnon and CUfton— Chlst Bull Bear's 
Indiana — Ross and Aabton — Galetl's Monkey.. 
MASON CITY, IA. 
Begaxtt (Flnt Half) — Will Morris— Chief Ball 
Bear's Indians. (Laat Half)— Lexey and O'Connor 
— Curtis' Comedy Canlnee. 

MOOSE JAW, CAN. 
Allan (Pint Half)— Hector ft Pal*— Jonathan— 
Gorman Bros. — Mile. Lnxanne A Ballet. 
MTHNEAPOLIH. MTJaH. 
New Palace — Work ft Ower — Mildred Hayward— 
John T. Doyle A Co.— Smith A Kanfman— "Sep- 
tember Morn." 

NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 
Empire (Flnt Half) — Greta Von Bergen— Blair 
ft Crystal — Ryan ft Ryan — Otto Koerner ft Co. — 
Victoria Trio— The Erforda. (Laat Half)— Black 
A McCons — Firgo ft Well*— Rose ft Roaina— Bryan 
Lee ft Co. — Arthur Barrett — King Troup*. 
OAKLAND. CAL. 
Hippodrom* (Pint Half)— Brook* ft Loeell*— 
Snlllvsn A Mayan — Jere Sanford— Sunset 81a — 
Coleman Goeti ft Co.— Dire llr.ithers. (List Hllf) 
— VMM ft Chapman— Ham Hood— Flo Adler ft Co. 
—Pope ft Uno— Delton Mareena ft Deltol— Dal* ft 
Weber. 

OMAHA, NEB. 
Empress (First Half) — Hooper A burkhart — 
Green. McHenry ft Dean— Neal Abel— Four Nov- 
elty Pierrots. (Last Half)— Will Morris— London 
Trio — Btrasaler*. Anlmala. 

PEORIA, ILL. 
Orpheam (First Half)— Two Bloody*— Hahn, 
Waller A Marts — Harry BeresfoRl A Co. — Dickin- 
son ft Desgon— Cycling McNutti. (Laat Half)— 
Lucy Gillette — Joale Heather ft Co.— Howard A 
Fields— Wllllsms ft Wolfoa. 

ROCHESTER. MINN. 
Metropolitan (Last Half)— Th* Schnltses — Mans 
deld A Riddle— McOooda Tates and Co. 
SASKATOON, CAN. 
Empire (First Half)— Klppy ft Klppy— Once 
Hanson — Browning ft Dean — Grossman's Enter 
talners. 

SIOUX FALLS, 8. D. 
Orpheum (Flnt Half) — Janls and West — Mr. A 
Mm, Melburn— Dave Rotb — Novelty CUntona. (Laat 
Halt) —Tossing Austins — Van 1'erra and Van Perrs 
— Santos and Hay** — Nlghton's Four Statues. 

PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From IJhartr St . 7 A. M. to 1* P. M. 

and at Midnight with SUspar* 

11 MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. Zld St, 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Con.ult P. W. HEROY, E. P. Ajjreat* 

14*. BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




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AT SUBMARINE PRICES 
, liT.H j as bach. ....... 



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WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 

145 W. 4Gth St., N. Y. 4 W. 22dSt,N. Y. 
NEW CmCULAR NOW READY 

lR*a e.saa Oar MMJMJ 
IS Deposit Required 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



I 



THE PARADISE OF YOUR DEAR EYES 

A HIGH CLASS BALLAD 

Words by SCHUYLER GREENE, author of "Babes in the Wood," lyrics of "Nobody Home," "Very Good Eddie," etc 
Musk by CHAS. MILLER, arranger of "Down by the Old Millstream," "Poor Butterfly," etc., etc 

A BEAUTIFUL POEM— AN EXPRESSIVE MELODY EASY TO SING. 
WILL LEND CLASS TO ANY SINGING ACT. SEND FOR COPY NOW! 

Orchestration with violin obbligato in any key. Scored by die composer. 

Entr-acte, by SILVIO HEIN. Danced nightly by the 
eminent artists MAURICE and FLORENCE WALTON 

PASS THE BUTTER ^^ trS^^^L'rSl Si 

^__________^_^_^^^_______^__^________ essence or rox-tr otology —Comedy Irombone rare. 



Two 

Woiderfni 

iBslnunentSi 

Nnmbers 



B LJ B B L 



Orchestrations of the above two numbers sent free to recognized acts and orchestra leaders. 



CARL MILLEGRAM PUBLISHING CO., Inc. 



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NEW YORK CITY 



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UNITED BOOKING 



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AprO 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



Route* Mart Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

STOCK AND REPERTOIRE ROUTES 
Permanent and Traveling 

Academy Players — Haverhill, Mass., Indef. 

American Players — Spokane, Wash., Indef. 

Auditorium Players— Maiden, Mam., Indef. 

Angell Stock Hoe Angel), mgr.)— Park, 
Pittsburgh, indef. 

Balnbrldee Players — Minneapolis, Indef, 

Bayley, J. Wlllard, Players — Belolt, Wla, in- 
def. 

Bryant, Marguerite, Players — Empire. Pitts- 
burgh, 2-14. 

Brooklyn's Own Stock (Chas. W. Daniels, 
mgr.) — Grand 0. H., Brooklyn, Indef. 

Benjamin, Jack, Stock — Sauna, Ken., indef. 

Bishop Playera — Oakland, Cal., Indef. 

BnnnoK, Emma, Stock — San Antonio, Tex., 

Brbee, H. E., Stock — Hutchinson, Kan., - in- 
def. 

Bishop Playera — Oakland, Cal., indef. 

Compton-Flumb Stock (II. H. Plnmb, mgr.) 
—Racine, Wis., indef. 

Colombia Players — Grand Rapids, Mich., 
indef. 

Colombia Musical Stock — Oakland, Cal., 
Indef. 

Denbam Stock — Denver, Indef. 

Dublnskv Stock (Ed. Dnblnsky, mgr.) — St. 
Joseph, Mo.,- Indef. 

Deming, Lawrence, Theatre Co. — Cogswell, 
Aberdeen, 8. D., 1-8. _ 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharpa- 

bnrg. Pa-, Indef. ^ : _ 

Eckhardt, Oliver, Playera — Beglna, Sask., 

Can., Indef. ' 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass., Indef. 
Empire Players — Salem, Mass., Indef. 
Fifth Ave. Stock (Jacques B. Horn, mgr.) — 

Fifth Ave. , Brooklyn, indef. 
Fleming, Alice, Stock— Portland, Ore., Indef. 
Qardlnler Bros,, Stock — Ft. Dodge, la., indef. 
Qracey-Chrlstie Co.— TJUea, N. Y., 2-7. 
Hyperion Players — New Haven, conn., indef. 

Horne, Col. F. P., Stock — Akron. 0-, Indef. 

Jewett, Henry, Players — Copley, Boston, In- 
def. ' _ 

Keith's Hndson Theatre, Stock — Union Hill, 
N. JL indef. 

Keith Stock — Portland, Me., 8, Indef. 

Knlckerbocker Stock (Carl Miller, mgr.) — 
Folia., 9, indef. V- 

Lawrence, Det, Stock — Vancouver. Can., In- 
Lyric' Theatre Stock — Bridgeport, Conn., In- 
def. 

Loner'gan Players (B. V. Phelan. mgr.) — 
Lynn, Mass., Indef. __ . __ 

Lewln, Florence, Players (Hawkins A Kib- 
bee, mers.) — Wichita. Kan., Indef. ... 

Lorch, Theo., Stock— Phoenix, ArU.. Indef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, indef- „ 

McKlnley, PatH, Players — Zanesvllle, O., in- 
def. 

Ifosart Players— Elmlra, N. Y„ Jndef. 

Northampton Players — Northampton, Mass., 
Indef. • . _ 

Naylor. Walter, Players— New Britain, Conn., 
indef. 

New Strand Stock— Mobile, Ala., indef. 

Norwood, Maude, Stock (Win. J. Nelson, 
mgr.) — Oil City. Pa-, Indef. _ _ 

NcBtell Players— TJnrant, Okla.. 2-7: Henry- 
etta, 0-14. . 

Orpheum Players — Reading, Pa., indef. 

Overholser Stock — Oklahoma City, Okla., in- 
def 

Oliver, Otis, Players (Harry J. Wallace, 
mgr.) — La Fayette, Ind„ Indef. , . . 

Opera Players— Kansas City, Mo., Indef. 

Princess Stock — Sioux City, la.. IndeT. 

Players Stock — Players, St. Louis, Indef. 

Poll Stock— Scranton, Pa., Indef. 

PoU Players — Polls, Washington, indef . 

Poll Players — Worcester, Mass., indef. 

Playhouse Players — Mt Vernon, M. Y. 

Packard, Jay. Stock— Newark, N. J.. », indef. 

Purities Stock — Sheldon, la., 2-7. 

Quaker Maids M. C. Co. — Hutchinson, Kan.. 

Rhen-Curtts Show— SaronvlHe, Neb„ 2-7. 
Spooner, Cedl, Stock — Castle So... Boston, 8. 

8bnbert Stock— Milwaukee. Indef. 

Shnbert Stock — St. Paul. Indef. „,,,. 

SomervUle Theatre Players— Somervllie, 
Mass., indef. _ ' ,_ , _, __ * 

St. Clair. Wlnfred, Stock (Earl Slpe, mgr.) — 
Paterson. N. J., Indef. - - - 

8herman Kelly Stock— Aberdeen, S. D., indef. 

Temple Stock — Ft. Wayne, Ind.. indef. 

Taylor. Albert. Stock— El Paso, Tex,, Indef. 

Toler. Sydney. Stock— Portland. Me., 9, Indef. 

Van Dyke A Eaton Stock <F. Mack, mgr.) — 
Tulsa, Okla., Indef. 

Wilkes Players— Salt Lake City, Indef. 

Wilkes Musical Stock — Vancouver, Can., In- 
def 

Wadsworth Dram. Stock (Edward Ornstein, 
mgr.) — Toledo, O.. indef. _ _ 

Wigwam Stock (Lander Stevens, mgr.) — 8an 
Francisco, Indef. _ .. __ ._..— 

Wallace, Chester. Players—Butler. Pa-, Indef. 

Williams, Ed., Stock— Elkhart, Ind.. indef. 

Wtlllams, Ed.. Stock — Qtiiney, 111., 8, lnder. 

* COMPANIES 1H TABLOID PLAYS 

Permanent and Tra-velmg 

"Birds of Paradise" — Danville, Va., 2-7: 
Petersburg. 9-14. . . 

Enterprise Stock (Norman Hllvard, mgr.) — 
Chicago, Indef. ■■ ... _,,, 

Enterprise Stock No. 2 Co. (Norman Hll- 
vard, mar.)- — Chicago, indef. _ " ■ 

Hyatt A LeNore Miniature M. C. Co. (T. 
H. Hyatt, mgr.) — Moose Jaw, Sask., Can., 
Indef. . _ . 

Harris A Proy M. C. Co.— Mlnot. N. D.. In- 
def. ^ , 

Submarine Girls (Merseren Bros., mgr.) — 
El Beno. Okla., 1-7: 8hawnee, 8-14. 

Tabarln Qlrla (Dave Newman, mgr.)— At- 
lanta, Qa., 2-7. 

Walker's Musical and Lady Minstrels— 
Roanoke Rapids. N. C 2-7. « 




MINSTRELS 

Field's. Al. G. — Hammond, Ind., 4 ; South 
Bend, 7-8; Elkhart, 9: Kalamazoo, Mich., 
10 ; Battle Creek, 11 : Jackson, 12 ; Toledo. 
O., 18-14. 

O'Brien's, Nell. Minstrels (Oscar F. Hodge, 
mgr.) — St Petersburg. Fia., 4 ; Tampa, 5 ; 

Orlando. 8 ; St. Augustine, 7 ; Waycross, Qa., 
0; Savannah, 10: Charleston, S. C, 11; 
Orangeburg. 12 ; Sumter, 18 : Wilmington, 

CARNIVALS 

Barkoot, K. G., Shown — Reldsvllle, N. C, 

2-7: Norfolk, Va.. 0-14. 
Campbell's United Shows— Reldsvllle, N. C, 

2-7. 
Bubln It ChcrrySfcows — Muskogee, Okla., 2-7. 

CIRCUSES 

Barnum & Bailey — Madison Sq. Garden, New 

York, Indef. 
Cole Bros. — Antlocfa, Cal„ 4: Folsom City. 

B: Placervllle. 6: VaUejo, 7. 
Gollmar-Patterson Shows — Paola, Kan.. 7. 
Rlngllng Bros. — Coliseum, Chicago, 7, indef. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Smith, Mysterious (Albert A Smith, nigra.) — 
Sarles, N. D„ 4-6;- Munich, 8-7; Loma, 
9-10; Adams, 11-12; Lanktn, 13-14. 

BURLESQUE 
Colombia Wheel 

Al. Reeves— Casino. Philadelphia. Apl. 2-7 : 

Miner's, Bronx, New York, 9-14. 
Behman Show — Gaiety, Montreal, Can., Apl. 

2-7: Empire, Albany, N. Y., 0-14. 
Ben WeleVs — Colonial. Providence, B. I., ApL 

2-7: Boston, 9-14. 
Bon Tons — Boston, Apl. 2-7; Grand, Hart- 
ford, Ct, 0-14. 
Bostonlans — Orpheum, Paterson, N. J., Apl. 

2-7 ; Empire, Hoboken, N. J.^ 0-14. 
Bowery — Columbia, Chicago, Apl. 2-7 ; Gaiety, 

Detroit. 9-14. 
Fellies of the Day — Lyric, Dayton, O., ApL 

2-7 ; Olympic, Cincinnati, 9-14. 
Globe Trotters — Empire, Albany, N. Y., Apl. 

2-7; Boston, 0-14. 
Golden Crooks — Jacques, Waterbory, Ct, ApL 

2-7 ; Cohen's, Newbnrg, N. Y., 9-11 ; Cohen's, 

Pongnkeepsle, 12-14. 
Hastings Snow — Star and Garter, Chicago, 

ApL 2-7; Bercnel, Des Moines, la., 9-10. 
Hello New York — Casino, Brooklyn, Apl. 2-7; 

Empire. Newark, N. J., 9-14. 
Hip- Hip-Hooray Girls — Empire, Hoboken, 

Apr. 2-7; People's, Philadelphia, 9-14. 
Howe's Kissing Girls — 8tar, Cleveland, O., 

Apl. 2-7 ; Empire, Toledo, O., 0-14. 
Irwin's Big Show — Open, Apl. 2-7; Gaiety, 

Kansas City, 0-14. 
Liberty Girls — Cohen's, Pougbkeepde, Apl. 

0-7 ; Hurtig A Seamon's, New York, e 14. 
Maids of America — Gaiety. Buffalo, N. Y., Apl. 

2-7; Corinthian, Rochester. N. Y.. 9-14. 
Majestic — Gaiety. Omaha, Neb., Apl. 2-7: 

open, 9-14 ; Gaiety. Kani 
Marlon's — Gaiety, Wasbln 

2-7 ; Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 9-14: 
Merry Rounders — Lumberg, Utlca, 5-7 ; Gaiety, 

Montreal, Can., 9-14. 
Midnight Maidens — Hurtig & Seamon's, New 

York, Apl. 2-7; Empire, Brooklyn, 0-14. 
Million Dollar Dolls — Boston, Apl. 2-7: Co- 
lumbia, New York, 0-14. 
Molly Williams' Co. — Berchel, Des Moines, 

Iowa. Apl. 2-4 : Gaiety, Omaha, Neb., 9-14. 
New York Girls — People s. Philadelphia, Apl. 

2-7 ; Palace, Baltimore. Md., 0-14. 
■'Puss Puss" — Park, Bridgeport, Apl. 5-7; 

Boston, 0-14. 
"Rag Doll In Ragland" — Corinthian, Roches- 
ter, N. Y., Apl. 2-7; Bastable, Syracuse, 9- 

11 ; Lumbers;, Utlca, 12-14. 
Roseland Girls — Olympic, Cincinnati, Apl. 2-7 : 

Chicago, 9-14. 
Rose Sydell's — Grand, Hartford. Ct, ApL 2-7 ; 

Jacques. Waterbury. Ct. 8-14. 
Sldman's Sam — Empire, Newark, "N. J., Apl, 

2-7 ; Casino, Philadelphia, 0-14. 
Some Show — Gaiety, Pittsburgh, Apl. 2-7; 

Star, Cleveland, O., 9-14. 
Spiegel's Revue — Gaiety, Toronto, Ont, Apl. 

2-7 : Gaiety. Buffalo, N. Y.. 9-14. 
Sight Seers — Empire, Brooklyn, N. Y., Apl. 

2-7: Park. Bridgeport, Ct, 12-14. 
Sporting Widows — Gaiety, Kansas City, Apl. 

2-7; Gaiety. St. Louis. Mo.. 9-14. 
Star and Garter — Empire, Toledo, O., ApL 

2-7; Lyric, Dayton, O., 9-14. 
Step Lively Girls — Palace, - Baltimore, Apl. 

2-7 ; Gaiety, Washington, D. C, 9-14. 
Twentieth Century Girls — Columbia, New 

York, ApL 2-7 ; Casino, Brooklyn. N. Y., 

0-14. 
Watson's Beef Trust— Miner's, Bronx, New 

York, Apl. 2-7 : Orpheum, Paterson, N. J., 

9-14. 
Watson-Wrothe — Gaiety, Detroit, Apl. 2-7; 

Gaiety, Toronto, Ont, 9-14. 

American Circuit 

American — Akron, O., Apl. 6-7 ; Empire, 
Cleveland, O., 9-14. 

Auto Girls — Star, Toronto, Apl. 2-7; Savoy. 
Hamilton, Can., 0-14. 

Broadway Belles — Open, Apl. 2-7 ; Century, 
Kansas City, 9-14. 

Beauty, Youth A Folly — Englewood, Chi- 
cago, Apl. 2-7 ; Gaiety, Milwaukee, Wis., 

Big Review of 1917 — International. Niagara 
Falls, ApL 5-7 ; Star, Toronto, Ont, 9-14. 

Cabaret Girls— Gaiety, Minneapolis. ApL 2-7; 
Star, St. Pant, Minn., 9-14. 

Charming Widows — Cadillac, Detroit ApL 
2-7 ; open, 9-14 ; Englewood, Chicago, 10-21. 

Cherry Blossoms — Worcester, Apl. 5-7; Ara- 



nsas City. 10-21. 
T Galcty, Washington, To. C, ApL 




Bterdam, N. Y., 0-10 ; Hudson, Schenectady, 

Darlings of Paris — Trocadero, Phlla., Apl. 2-7 ; 

Olympic, New York, 9-14. 
Follies of Pleasure— Gaiety. Milwaukee. Apl. 

2-7: Gaiety, Minneapolis, 9-14. 
French Frolics— Star, St. Paul, ApL 2-7 : open, 

0-14 ; Century, Kansas City, Mo., 10-21. 
Frollca of 1916 — Olympic, New York, Apl. 2-7 ; 

Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 9-14. 
Ginger Girls— 8tar, Brooklyn, Apl. 2-7; HoP 

yoke. Mass., 9-11 ; Springfield, 12-14, 

Girls from Joylaud — -Lyceum, Columbus, O., 
ApL 2-7: Newark. O.. 9: Zanesvllle, 10: 
Canton, 11: Akron, 12-14. 

Girls from the Follies — Park. Youngstown, 
0.. Apl. 8-7 : Penn Circuit, B-14. 

Grownup Babies — Gaiety, Brooklyn, ApL, 2-7; 
Academy, Jersey City, N. J., 0-14. 

Hello Girls — Open, Apl. 2-7 ; Englewood, Chi- 
cago, 9-14. 

Hello Paris — Wllkes-Barre. Pa.. Apl. 4-7: 
South Bethlehem, 9; Easton, 10; Potts- 
town, ll: Trenton, N. J., 12-14. 

High Life Girls— Hudson, Schenectady, Apl. 
4-7; Blnghamton. N. Y., 9-10; Oneida. 11: 
Inter National, Niagara Falls, 12-14. 

Lady Buccaneers — -Trenton, N. J.. Apl. 6-7 ; 
Star. Brooklyn, 9-14. 

Lid Lifters — Majestic, Bcranton, Pa., Apl. 
2-7; Gaiety. Brooklyn, 0-14. 

Phone 1826 Greeley 

REISER'S 

Long and short distance moving. Day and night 
Auto Theatric*] Transfer Co., ITS west astfc St. 
service. If we take order we set yon there. 

JOHN A. WALSH 

Writer of the Cleverest in Vaudeville, Songs, 
Sketches. Monologs. Patter. Wills Point Texas. 

Reliable Professional af 
FRANCIS X. HENNESSY M 

Irian Piper — Scotch riper — Irish Step Dan- Wtj 
i eer — Scotch rung Dancer — Violinist (lis- <SH 
tcklu) — Teacher— Kay Paris. Arret! tarn ml 
■this adibea: 322 Saws An., Ii* Tart, -JCI 




_ DS PROVE 
Send Me. f * saa 



IT 18 BEST. 

W. UtiSU, JT. T 



Wanted Colored Musicians 

for Circus work — 1 bass. 2 trombones, 2 cornets, 
alto and trap drums. 81ngers and dancers. Look 
season, good treatment. Money guaranteed. Sal- 
ary low. Open May 10. Address W. 8. LsVABD, 
807 £ast Washington St., Irnnu, It. V. 

W. H. HARRIS, TstANS?r^ AL 

Hf West »th Street. New York 

Storehouse— 315-317 W. Uth Street 

Phone Greeley 1474 Trunks Cared For 

WILL BUY Diamond Dye Drop Country 
Grocery Store— 504, Aator Theatre 
Bldg., New York City. - 

WANTED e.,f* l—tMT Wildcat and Paste 
Live Wire §K VI E. HI I When Necessary 
Must write good press dope. State lowest to 
J. C BANKS. Glens Falls, N. Y. Dramatic 
people write. 

600 Upholstered Theatre Seats 
For Sale 

Good condition. Pull particulars by address- 
ins; "a. J," Box SS, Room 1201. 220 Welt 
42nd Street. New York. 

Large, light A1BY r!AT.T t 
suitable for rehearsals, etc. 
Use of piano. Call or phone 

evenings. T.TWBFIt, 160 Vf. .USta, St., Sew Tork. 

Mornlngslde 7510. 



FOR RENT 



WHITE RAT TRANSFER CO., Inc. 

EXPIESS ssl MCGACE. ■aftats Starafs at law 1st.. 

147 Wast 37th Street, New York 

VENTRILOQUISM 



Taaflht Almoet Anjono at Rome. 8m»I I cnatt. 
'niditw 2-4- 1 **** t*ta»Hr» fo*- •naj+ : **n|- , v>a und t>roof. 

». «. smith, a—sag, aasiaiswst. rssria. m. 

30c — FOR ALL THIS — 30c 

8-sna. Craa-Sn for n. a f., s-aun. Croa-Bra for 2sl, 
g-mln. B. T. Moooloc, 4-nun. Oras-Sre for 2m.. s-aua. 
OUSF-Ore for m. It, 3 Bedtatlons. 15 Parodies and 85 
Ota. Comic Wants, etc. Hoar? Back aurutat! eUIY 
THAYER. 2190 Brot i St. flSlHail, I. I. 

WANTED a 
FOR 

Under Canvas. Leading Woman, Character Wo- 
man. Ease aaf J loan. Heavy Man. Others write. 
Preference to those doubling band or specialties. 
Eat In real cook tent. Pay own room rent. All 
week stands. Lowest sore salary first letter. Be- 
hearssls AprO 27th. 8TXST, HICKZB * BCOTT. 
yayetU, Ohio. 



Florence Players 



» 




ALBOLENE 

Geo. Morrison and a scot of other stars 0/ 
ass ttagt "tag in promt." 

They say that it "is the best preparation 

for removing all kinds of theatrical 

make-up" and that "it leaves the akin 

Soft, smooth and tree from irritation." 

AJbolene is put up in i and s ounce tubes 

to fit the mike-up bos: also in '? and i lb. 

cans. It mar be had of tnoet djujcsisia end 

lata in make-up. Sat*pUfree enrtfutil, 

McKESSON & ROBBINS 

Incorpo rated 



•1 Fulton Street 



New York 4 



MADISON'S BUDGET 

mj a « Hits the high spots of con- 

nlA 111 ed> excellence. Contents ln- 

* ,v " * w elude 12 original monologues. 
8 great acts for two males and T tor mile 
and female, a bright Irish act for three peo- 
ple, 20 sure-fire parodies, 4 professional snln- 
strel first-parts, a screaming tabloid comedy, 
entitled "Bare Mercy, Jadg-e"; also hun- 
dreds of nifty gsgs snd funny sidewalk hits. 
Remember the price of MADISON'S BUDGET 
No. 16 U only ONE DOLLAR. JAJCES 
HADIS0H, 1068 Third Arcane, Sew Tors, 



Furlong's Stock Co. Wafits People in all lines. 
Most have good wardrobe and quick study. A-l 
dressers on the street. This company In theaters 
all inmmer. People for Band and Orcbestrs, 
Trap Drummer to double brass. Actors Doubling 
Brass glreo preference. Make salary low, all to 
first letter. Opens April SO. Week stsnds many . 
Send open time for spring snd fsll season. ITJE- 
LONQ & SE SAUTE, No. 18 W. OUppawa St. 
Buffalo, it, y. 

Medicine Men 

Are reanlBg a hurett rttbl so* sllb our line of rrn- 
edlea. Our reds are the moat reliable and our paper the 
fiaett tier put out by u; supply brae. Write st once 
for prices sad samples of paper. IIEfifM 1ID1AS 
sUDICliE CO., tony, fi.. Da> A. 

AT LIBERTY 

RICHARD LESTER 

Age 35, 5 ft. 8 in., 135 lbs. Light comedy, 
juveniles, gen. bus. Rep., Stock, Musical 
Comedy. Al singing specialty. RICHARD 
LESTER. .Christie Lake, Near Perth, Out., 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Bits from Songland 

Now Harlem Opera House. Last Halft 

Fifth Avenue 
Direction NORMAN JEFFERIES 



Wanted lor Next Season 

Chorus ladles for 
THE BEEF* TRUST 

Also Small Girls for the 
UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Also want good feature acta, and people 1m all 
lines of Burlesque. Address BTT.T.Y WAISOsT. 
Orpheum Theatre, Paterson, N, J. 



I ACTS 70B BALE CHEAP. We 
Buy. Bell or Bxehanjte need 
Apparatus. Professional Cata- 
log lOe. Pocket Trick Included FREE. Write or 
CslL Haranaa Kagio Co.. 8ts. 1, 470 SthAr.,X.T. 



MAGIC! 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 



Lew J. Welsh 

(CoattdUa) . 

Jeuie Howard 
AI S. Warner 

(Producer) 

Ruth Wheeler 
PatRafferty 
Dagmar Linette 
Eddie Dettman 
Nettie Woods 
Frank Bertrand 
Kathryn Oakes 
Harvey J. Maxwell 
Virginia Lee 
J. Warren Lawler 
Naomi Wheeler 
Carl Gray 

(Director) 

Helen Lohmar 
Gust Lentz 
Mary Hageman 
Roy Sampson 

(Advance) 

Margery Sidman 
John Malloy 
AnnaStyvers 
Jimmy Myers 
Olive Sampson 
Harry Fisher 
Nancy Vaughn 
Marie Le Munyon 
Marie McKenna 
Irene Thornton 
Ada Sweet' 
Patti Donahue 
"Toodles" MaxweU 




LOOKING FOR SUMMER LOCATION . 

including 

" LEW J. WELSH 

l Comedian 

Can offer most advantageous contract to break in new plays for next regular season. 
With ten royalty musical comedies — thirty-four people — twenty girls — carload of real scen- 
ery — more electricity than Coney Island — some real voices — and the best comedian off Broad- 
way — this show has been the sensation of the past season. Nothing like it since the Wilbur 
Opera Company. Hasn't always made money, but always has made good. For time next 
season write C O. Tennis — Longacre Building, N. Y. City. 

Can always use reliable musical comedy people who like fifty-week seasons. Chorus people 
of ambition always in demand — can use top tenor immediately. Sobriety my first require- 
ment, of everyone. 

It has been no cinch making this a full grown show in one season. With the help of those 
whose names border this card we have accomplished what some people said was impossible. 
I thank them and some others. * 

Regards to all — enemies included. Easter is forgiveness time and the Golden Rule our 
religion. 

Two girl shows next season unless the war stops everything. Mostly war makes girl shows 
gold mines. >^^^^ Write 




'Jlt^f & w 



"Specialist in Sensible Priced Attractions'' 
Room 817* Longacre Bldg., New York Ctt> 



MR. THEATRE MANAGER 

Um You Want a New Curtain??? 

The day of the old unsightly curtain with a lot of 
advertisements daubed on is past. 

TRY THE NEW WAY 

We furnish you a curtain of which you may well 
be proud. Painted by a master hand. 

THE HIGHEST CLASS OF ADVERTISING 

that your patrons will appreciate. 

THE MOST IMPORTANT FEATURE 

Our financial standing insures honest treatment. 
MONEY TALKS. Look up our rating, then com- 
municate with us for terms. 

WM. S. EMERY CO., Inc. 



References: 

Bank of America, 

44 Wall S t. , N. Y. 

R. G. Don & Co. 

Brmdttreets 



118 East 28th Street, 
New York 




For CIAS. B. WALDRON'S 

*B0ST0NIANS" 

SEASON 1917-1918 

Good Principal. Burlesque people of all kinds. 
Quartette capable of playing parts. Good Sister 
Act and soubrette, and any good Novelty suitable 
for Burlesque. Address, 

CHARLES H. WALDRON, 

Waldron's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



MILLER & KENT 

(LATE OF VAUDEVILLE) 
Beg to Announce that They Are Conducting 

SCHULICH'S EXCLUSIVE SAMPLE STYLE SHOP 

Coots, Saits, Dresses and Gowns 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE SOLICITED 
122 W. 44th STREET NEW YORK CITY 



Bmn<m~* "THE ADELAIDE" «& $Hrrf 38* 

754-766 Eighth Ave., Bet 46th and 47th St»., One Block Weet of Broadway 

I ApartaMntt, CompltUlj ForalsM far Himilmahg. Stew Htmt, Beta. Pfccn. 
StHctfy Prafcuieaal MRS. GEO. KEGEL, Umpr 



April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



THE SONG OF THE MOMENT AND FOR ALL TIMES 



WE'LL NEVER LET OUR OLD FLAG EALL 



Lyric by ALBERT E. MACNUTT 



CHORUS 



Music by M. F. KELLY 



"We'll never let our old flag fall In peace or war, our voices ring 

For we love it the best of all 'My Country 'Tis of thee.* we sing; 

We don't want to fight to show our might At the sond of her call, we'll show them all 

" But when we start we'll fight, fight, fight. We'll never let our old flag fall." 

Not a Patter Song, bat a. Song for Singers, with a Refrain That Will Ring Through the Ages 

Orchestrations Ready 
Sola Selling Agents for John Mmnna in U. S. A. 

& CO., Ltd., 41 East 34th Street, NEW YORK 



fred A Sensation! joe 

La France and Kennedy 

"Sons of Two Southern Colonels 4 ' 

In their Own New Act 

"After the Battle" 

Thanks for all offers. Will eventually get to all of you. 

Original Black Face Theme — Written by Ourselves — Copyrighted and Protected 

Direction HARRY and LEO FITZGERALD 



RUTH ROBINSON 

I aarting Woman 

MOROSCO THEATRE, LOS ANGELES 
America's Foremost Productions 




AT ONCE 



LYMAN WHITE 



ADELAIDE IRVING 



As* 39. wetcat 18 

Prefer Stock or one week Rep. Excellent wardrobe. 
Address P. O. Box 1*3, Sal Ins, K s ns s s 



Leads or Second Business. 
Age ZS, Weight US. 

Can dress and play any parts cast (or. 



Wanted. Character General Business Man 

Director, stage manager, band leader with music; cornet player. One real 
actor, musician, boss canvasman. State salary, age, experience. Pay own wires. 
Chas. Monroe, if at liberty, wire. Address EARL HAWK, Big Stock Co., 
Albany, Ga. 



10TH YEAR •- ■« m r 

SUMMER HVV 

"Happy" LOU 

Versatile 1 asaBjSJ Man— not under 5 ft. 11 in. Man and Woman (or Haovla* and Characters. 
Single Vaudeville Act. Change for week. Pianist, leader (violin), no liquor tolerated. People 
here 10 years. State lowest: sore salary. Experience. Send photos. Open Hay 
AND WALBOURN. ImU r City, ~ 



A IV T 
WHITNEY 



Ew-t. 10THYEAR 
«-■ WINTER 

STOCK CO. 

aaractsrs. 

L People 
WELSH 



Bell Telephone 

SOUTHERN 



THEATRICAL EXCHANGE 

apable attention. 



We will give YOUR business prompt and 
GET ACQUAINTED 
517 Temple Court Building, Atlanta, Ga. 



GENE LEWIS s OLGA WORTH 

Just having closed their own company after on€ hundred weeks of 
stock, including seasons at St. Louis, Dallas, Evansville, etc., invite 
offers for the spring season. 

DRAMATIC STOCK PRODUCTION PICTURES 

All Communications Care 
Chamberlain Brown, Fitzgerald Bldg., New York 



WANTED— Actors and Musicians 



FOR 



FRANK MANNING'S SHOW 

Week stand Rep. under canvas in Kansas. Actors doubling; brass or specialties 
preferred. Send photo or cut and tell all. Musicians doubling B. & O. or 
stage. Dramatic rehearsals April 16. Musicians April 30. Address FRANK 
MANNING, Beloit, Kans. 



Wanted 
f or . . . 



NEW 



HOTEL WARNER 

(EUROPEAN) 
Cottage Grore Avenue anal 33rd Street, Chicago 



Telephone Douglas 873 
F. BURT CARR, President and Maaacer 

(Formerly with Victoria. Wellington and Morrison Hotels) 
THEATRICAL PATRONAGE DESIRED 
250 Outside Booms, 200 Prlrate Baths, Booms with Private Bath. S1.00 per dar and upwards. 
Weekly sod Permanent Bates. FlBEPROOr. BZOBLLENT CAPB. POPULAR PRICES. 



Kinscy Komedy Ko. ";„!:; 

A-l Juvenile leading man and Hesvj man. Strong line of parts. General Business people with speeisl- 
ties. Must hare wardrobe, appearance and ability. Bute full particulars, belfbt. weight, see, etc. 
Send photos, which will be returned. Loos season. Rehearsals April 16th. Week stands. TRACT. J. 
htt.t.tw_ So. Ml V. Poplar St, FostorU, Ohio. 

WANTED FOR REPERTOIRE (c u r v C A R s) 

Banc and Banco Comedian and Soubrette, matt do red hot song and dance ipeclaltlea. All around Gen. 
Boa. Man, with specialties. Preference glren one who play* some Instromeot in openinc overture. Gen. 
Baa. Woman, most do specialties. Piano Player, read and fake, not too flood to play a baby planu on a 
tent show. Trap Drummer, with full line of trap*, moat hare bells and be able to do a specialty. Boas 
Oanrfmaman, with weight and strena*th and not afraid to work one* a week: name lowest ealsrr (pay 
own) flr«t letter. Dlsorg anlaers. chronic kickers, amateora and people who use Intoxicating: liquors don't 
answer tola. J. X. PEKCT, Farmer City. ZU. 

AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

BOSAJM and GRANGER 



8p ~ ul Sons of Ham 



SINGING. DANCING. MUSIC 
AND COMEDY. IN VAUDEVILLE 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 1917 





DISTRIBUTING 

COMBINE IS 

RUMOR 

SELZNICK'S NAME MENTIONED 

Rumors of a giant merger of all dis- 
tributing organizations of the motion pic- 
tare industry, literally wiping ont about 
half of the exchanges now in operation, 
were rampant this week and, although 
nothing definite could be obtained regard- 
ing the plan, the name of Lewis J. Selz- 
nick was frequently mentioned, together 
with the heads of half a dozen other big 
companies who were known to have been 
in conference with him. 

The scheme is said to be the outcome of 
the confessions made by leaders of program 
producing companies before the Wheeler 
Committee when it investigated the film 
industry, recently. 

"We're going bankrupt," was virtually 
the unanimous assertion of all these pro- 
ducers. It was testified' the revenue on 
program service was hardly more than 
sufficient to pay the coat of picture mak- 
ing and distribution. Enormous salaries 
for stars and tremendous overhead cost 
for the maintenance of distributing forces 
were declared to be devouring the income 
of the big companies. 

A continuous debate between represen- 
tatives of the program branch on one side 
and the open market group of the indus- 
try on the other, has been carried on ever 
since. "Which is the best method of 
marketing films," was the question at is- 
sue. 

The debate, however, flowed against the 
paddlea of a financial mill wheel about a 
week ago, when three magnates got to- 
gether and chorused: "Let's get together." 

Very little headway was made at this 
meeting, but a second and third confer- 
ence ensued. 

Selznick, head of the Selznick enter- 
prises was invited to participate. 

He is a staunch advocate of the open 
market or state rights process of film 
distribution. 

In recent statements he placed himself 
on record in favor of state rights for all 
productions of high calibre. 

It is understood that should the pro- 
gram merger be effected, it will abolish 
approximately $10,000,000 of waste ex- 
penses annually. The plan of operation 
would be to form all the leading produ- 
cers into one releasing enterprise, with 
exchanges in all convenient metropolitan 
centers of the country. 

The central headquarters would handle 
the book-keeping and general service for 
the entire program distributing field. The 
organization would select for permanent 
operation exchanges having the largest 
equipment, best location and most com- 
plete marketing facilities. 

An interesting sidelight on the activi- 
ties of the merger promoters was a recent 
independent conference among film com- 
pany presidents in the Hotel Astor. The 
men at this conference were Walter 
Greene, president of Artcraft: Hiram 
Abrams, president of the Paramount Pic- 
tures Corp.; Harry Raver, president of 
Art Dramas, and Richard Rowland, presi- 
dent of the Metro Pictures Corp. These 
men are believed to have discussed at that 
time a merger proposition altogether dis- 
tinct from the present enterprise. 



FOX TO HOLD CELEBRATION 

The Fox Film Corporation will cele- 
brate the formal opening of their new 
quarters April 12 and hundreds of ex* 
blbltors from all parts ot the territory 
covered by the exchanges are e xp ec t ed to 
be present. 



VAN LOAN IN NEW BERTH 

Herbert H. Van Loan, for the past two 
and a half years publicity manager for 
the Universal Film Manufacturing Co., 
has resigned to take effect next Saturday, 
after which lie will become identified with 
the staff of the Motion Picture Magazine, 
as a feature writer. 

Van Loan has been responsible for 
some of the biggest "stories" of the in- 
dustry. Some of the special publicity 
"stunts" which be promoted and engin- 
eered were the .TJniversal's Famous Beauty 
Contest; the Handsome Man contest; the 
Universal Film Trophy automobile con- 
test, a ten year event, which had its in- 
ception last Fall and which will again be 
raced for on May 10 at the Uniontown 
(Pa.) Speedway. 



HORSLEY RETAINS FAHRNEY 

David Horsley has renewed his con- 
tract with Milton H. Fahrney and the 
latter will, therefore, continue to direct 
Cub Comedies for another period. The 
new contract was signed March 15th and 
carries with it a big increase in salary for 
the director. 

Sir. Fahrney has been associated with 
David Horsley productions for a longer 
time than any other attache of the plant 
He was with Mr. Horsley when the lat- 
ter first started to produce pictures in 
Bayonne, N. jr., over ten years ago. 



PASS SUNDAY FILM BILL 

Habtfobd, Conn., March 20.— The Mar- 
tin Sunday bill was passed at the Capital 
here today by a vote of 18 to 16 and will 
now be referred to Governor Holcomb. 
The bill, applying to towns of 10,000 popu- 
lation or over, permits sports and moving 
picture entertainments and legalizes all 
these pleasnres throughout Connecticut on 
the sabbath. This is the straw that breaks 
the camel's back, marking the first crack 
in the famous Blue Laws of the Nutmeg 
State which have been rigidly enforced for 
three hundred years. 



FILM SPIRITUAL, SAYS WARREN 

Edward Warren wishes to let the world 
know that his state right production. "The 
Warfare of the Flesh" does not carry a 
message of ordinary warfare. The pro- 
duction deals with spiritual forces, and 
portrays the evolution of struggle between 
the elements of good and evil down through 
the ages. The film opens with a presenta- 
tion of the first spiritual conflict known 
to the race, the expulsion of the sinning 
angels from heaven. 



CONTRACT FOR ART DRAMAS 

F. H. Sanford and L. C. McHenry, 
among the best known film men of the 
southwest, have just entered into a con- 
tract to handle the entire Art Dramas out- 
put for their territory, ■ abandoning the 
star feature films they had been handling. 
They incorporate under the firm name of 
"Southwestern Art Drama, Inc.," and will 
make their headquarters in Dallas, Tex. 



KAUFMAN AND WIFE INJURED 

Joseph Kaufman, director of motion pic- 
tures, and his wife, Ethel Clayton, had a 
narrow escape from fatal injuries last 
Wednesday night, when an automobile 
collided with their limousine on the Hud- 
son Terrace Road, between Fort Lee and 
Englewood, N. J, 



BLACKTON OFFERS PRIZE 

A prize of $1,000 for the best article, 
essay or other literary expression on the 
subject of preparedness has been offered by ' 
J. Stuart Blackton. The contest will close 
July 4 and the judges will be two army 
men, two navy men and Mr. Blackton. 



GOLDWYN GETS BROWNE 

Porter Emerson Browne has signed a 
three-year contract with the Goldwyn Pic- 
tures Corporation for his exclusive services 
in supplying the company with stories for 
the screen. 



EXHIBITOR TO 

TEST SUNDAY 

CONVICTION 

CASE TO HIGHEST COURT 



Schenectady, N. Y., March 31 — The 
first test case under the law against Sun- 
. day movies to be carried to the highest 
court will be that of Victor Bergstrom, 
manager of the Majestic theatre here. 
Bergstrom was found guilty by a jury In 
police court, the other day, of violating 
tiie Sunday law by operating his theatre 
December 10 last. He was fined $5. 

Bergstrom declares he will carry his 
appeal from this verdict to the Court of 
Appeals. If this tribunal should decide 
against him, he and his supporters in the 
industry plan to place the case before the 
Legislature. It is confidently expected by 
the film men that some new legislation will 
be written into the statute books if such 
should prove necessary to remove the pres- 
ent prohibition. 

Ten exhibitors were arrested in the gen- 
eral round up that enveloped Bergstrom. 
Two defendants who were brought to trial 
first were acquitted. 

The police commissioner expresses the 
belief that Bergstrom's conviction will 
cause the closing of all movie shows on 
Sunday hereafter. The ministerial asso- 
ciation has formally called on the Mayor 
to enforce this rule. 



PARAMOUNT HAS CLEAN SLATE 

The Paramount Pictures Corporation 
obtained an unusual feather for its cap re- 
cently at the hands of the Pennsylvania 
Board of Censors. This was in the form 
of an indorsement of the entire Paramount 
output, through the absence of a single 
Paramount picture in the list of those 
condemned by the Board. This is regarded 
as notable, Inasmuch as the Pennsylvania 
censors are the most stringent body of 
picture probers in the ' country. The 
board condemned 446 reels of pictures and 
163 slides in its last inspections. 



NEW ARBUCKLE RELEASE SOON 

The first Paramount Arbuckle Comedy, 
a two-reeler, in which Roscoe "Fatty" 
Arbuckle will make -his debut under the 
banner of the Paramount Picture Cor- 
poration, will be released on April 23d. 
The comedy, which Mr. Arbuckle himself 
asserts is the most hilarious piece of screen 
work he has ever accomplished, has been 
christened "The Butcher Boy," and. the 
production will be finished within a few 
days. 



TO TAX THEATRE PATRONS 

Haxitax", N. 8., March 27. — The theatre- 
goers of Nova Scotia win be taxed at rates 
ranging from one cent on a five-cent ticket 
to ten rents on a ticket costing more than 
fifty cents, by the provisions of a bill which 
has been introduced into the House of As- 
sembly by Premier Murray. The measure 
stipulates that the tax shall be collected 
by the owners of theatres by means of 
tickets issued by the board of censors. 



DINNER FOR FAIRBANKS 

A farewell dinner prior to his depart- 
ure for California next Thursday will be 
tendered Douglas Fairbanks by Walter E. 
Greene, president of the Artcraft Pic- 
tures Corporation, in the Manhattan 
Hotel, There will be about 100 invited 
guests. 



NANCE 0*NEIL QUITS MOVIES 

Nance .CNeil has cancelled her moving 
picture contracts with the Mutual Film 
Company, owing to the great strain of 
simultaneous! v appearing in "The Wan- 
derer" and rehearsing before the camera. 



STATE CENSOR BILL SET BACK 

Boston, March 30. — The Bay State Mo- 
tion Picture Censorship Bill was reported 
adversely yesterday in committee. The 
bill was the subject of a lengthy hearing 
at which the need of censorship because of 
the many sex films now being shown, was 
urged, but motion picture interests bad the 
support of Boston real estate and other 
business interests in their claims that pic- 
tures could be censored properly under the 
present system without expense to the State 
or trouble to the authorities. The sponsors 
of the bill intend carrying the fight to the 
floor of the House, four of the committee 
having dissented from the majority report. 



ANITA STEWART GOES SOUTH 

Anita Stewart and the cast of her latest 
picture venture, a James Oliver Curwood 
story, left New York Friday afternoon for 
New Orleans. In the party were Miss 
Stewart, Director Wilfrid North, and 
these members of the cast: Rudolph 
Cameron, Eulalic Jensen, Julia Swayne 
Gordon and Win. Dunn. The working title 
of the picture is "Rebellion," but there is 
no war theme in it. 



UNIVERSAL OFFERS NEW ONE 

The Universal Film Company has jnst 
launched another imposing production in 
the State rights field.. This is the film, 
"Even as You and I." The picture is de- 
scribed by experts who have watched its 
making, as one of the finest creations the 
Universal has turned out in the last few 
years. 



JOHNSON WITH WILLIAMSON 

Victor B., Johnson, familarly known as 
Vic, will hereafter be responsible for the 
advertising and publicity of the William- 
son Brothers' productions, controlled ex- 
clusively by the Submarine Film Cor- 
poration. Vic broke into Picturedom with 
Warner's Feature Film Company, after an 
extensive newspaper career. 



W. F. BARRETT TRANSFERRED 

W. F. Barrett has been appointed man- 
ager of the Toronto office of Vitagraph- 
V-L-S-B. succeeding L. H. Watrous. 
who goes to the Boston exchange. Mr. 
Barrett has been connected with the film 
industry for a number of years, his field 
of endeavor being the Dominion of Canada 
which he has covered from coast to coast. 



NETTER BUYS FILM FOR OHIO 

Leon D. Netter, of the Masterpiece Film 
Attractions, has purchased the Ohio rights 
to William N. 8elig*s latest production, 
"Beware of Strangers," featuring Thomas 
Santschi and an all star Selig cast The 
picture is an expose of the methods em- 
ployed by the members of the underworld. 



GENERAL USES TWO-REELERS 

The -General Film Company announces 
the establishment of a two-reel system that 
will give its fans a regular weekly out- 
put of four picture series. The service in- 
cludes Ham and Bud comedies extended 
to two-reel length, the O. Henry series, 
the American Girl series and the Selig 
cycle of two-reel dramas. 



FOX CIRCLING GLOBE 

The undertaking of William Fox to en- 
circle the globe with a chain of his own 
films was extended to Norway, Sweden, 
Spain and Portugal last week. The Fox 
headquarters are negotiating with film in- 
terests in several other countries to com- 
plete the chain. 



JASPER LEAVES HORSLEY 

John Jasper, for . the past year man- 
ager ' of the David Horsley Studios, has 
resigned, according to an announcement 
•■omin<? from Mr. Horsley. The resignation 
took effect March 31. His successor has 
not yet been appointed. 



, April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"FORGET-ME-NOT" 

World. Five reels. 

Cast. 
Stefanie Paoii Kitty Gordon 

K3SJW&:::::: :}*-•■"*••• 

itaraitii de Mohrivart. . . .Aleo B." Francu 

Sir Horace Welby George SfocQuarrie 

Sir Donald Verney Jomee Fvrey 

Rote Verney , Norma PhilUpt 

Alice Verney..,....., .....lAlUan Herbert 
Mr*. Foley ....... .Henrietta Simpson 

Story — Drama. Adapted from the play 

given 3,000 times on the spoken stage. 

Produced by Peerless for World Films. 

Directed by Emile Cbautard. Camera 

work by Lucien Tainguy. 
Action— Thoroughly good. 
Continuity — Perfect. 
Suspense— Very gripping. 
Detail — Excellent. 
Atmosphere — Very good. 
Photography— Of the best. 

Remarks. 

Stefanie Paoli, a mender of nets, is loved 
by Gabriel Barrato, a fisherman. Within 
a few hours after he kisses her farewell 
on leaving for a fishing trip the Marquis 
de Mohrivart a visiting French profligate 
through a lavish gift of jewels and prom- 
ises of a fine future in Paris induces 
Stefanie to wed him. Gabriel returns un- 
expectedly during the wedding festivities, 
and, after a terrible denunciation in the 
midst of the throng, runs to the shore and 
hurls himself to death from the top of a 
cliff. 

The Marquis takes his bride to Paris. 
Benedetto, the goatherd, on his regular 
yearly visit home, learns of Stefani's per- 
fidy. He swears vengeance. 

Six years later the Marquis has turned 
his chateau into a fashionable gambling 
place to recoup his dissipated fortunes 
and the marquise sends their son to Eng- 
land to be educated. Sir Horace Welby, a 
patron of the gaming table, becomes a 
deep admirer of the marquise. 

Fifteen years later, logical develop- 
ments bring young Charles de Mohrivart 
into marriage, Benedetto Barrato, with 
his life's savings goes to Paris, venge- 
ance bent, and brings together a rich as- 
sortment of complications, all logical and 
intense. 

Benedetto tries to slay the marquise 
and docs slay her husband. He is sen- 
tenced for life. Sir Donald, however, con- 
jures up a vision of the slayer, freed 
from prison, in such a way as to finally 
defeat the continued heartlessness of the 
marquise. 



"CAPTAIN ALVAREZ" 

Vitagraph. Five Reels. 

Released March 28 by Vitagraph. 

Cast. 

Robert Waintcright ... .William D. Taylor 

Reman George C. Stanley 

Don Arena Otto Lederer 

Benita Don Edith Storey 

Mercede* Myrtle Gonzales 

Tirzo, the toy George Holt 

Gonsalo, chief of police. George Kunkel 

Story — Melodrama. Written by H. T. 
Sheldon from the play by Panl Qilmore. 
Scenario by Marguerite Bertaehe. Di- 
rected by Rollon S. Sturgeon. 

Action — Interesting. 

Continuity— Consistent. 

Suspense — Sustained. 

Detail— O. K. 

Atmosphere— Convincing. 

Photography — Not always the, best 

Remarks. 
This picture was never a world beater 
and whether or not its thrills and suspense 
will carry the reissue to success Is a prob- 
lem only to be answered by results. 

Box Office Value. 
One day. Advertise thrilling scenes. 



"THE PRICE OF HER SOUL" 

Variety Films. Six Reels. 

Released April 2 by Variety Film* Corp. 

Cast 

Ailene Graham Gladys Brock%oell 

Snap Gun Connor .Jack Standing 

Dr. Howard Graham Monroe Salisbury 

Lord Francis Wolberton. .Brooklyn Keller 

Mary MoGowan Eleanor Crowe 

Ralph Connor Jack Abbott 

Pierre WU lard Louis 

Story — Drama written by Reed Heustis. 

Directed by Oscar Apfel. 
Action— Rapid. 
Continuity — Even. 
Suspense — Gripping. 
Detail— Very fine. 
Atmosphere— Good. 
Photography— Good. 

Remarks. 

"The Price of Her Soul" is a grewaome 
picture with a little attempt at com- 
edy to relieve the morbidity. The charac- 
ter of the hero is a complex one, unnoble, 
and illogical. That he should make the 
girl he loves a victim of his revenge on 
her father is repulsive. 

The picture was given an excellent pro- 
duction and was capably acted. 

"Snap Gun" Connor is saved from cap- 
ture by Ailene Graham, a society girl and 
social worker, when his "club" is raided, 
and falls in love with her. He is sent to 
the penitentiary for three years for an- 
other offence and, while there, sees the ef- 
fects of the drng traffic. 

When he returns home he finds his 
brother a victim of the deadly narcotic, 
and decides to fight the evil. He traces 
the source to Ailene's father, actuated by 
revenge for his brother's ruin, he kidnaps 
the girl and makes her a slave to the dope, 
and, when she becomes a helpless victim, 
returns to her father. 

Later, Ailene la to be married to Lord 
Francis Wolberton, but Connor stops the 
ceremony, exposes her father as the head 
of the vicious trust and takes Ailene 
away. She is sent to the mountains and 
is completely cured. Dr. Graham gives up 
his dealings in the drug and all ends hap- 
pily with Connor rewarded in his love for 
the girl. 

Box Office Value. 

One or two days. 



STATE RIGHTS 



NOW 
SELLING 



LOIS WEBER'S 7-REEL MASTERPIECE 

"EVENasYOUandl" 

Without even having seen "EVEN AS YOU 
AND I," Mr. S. L. Rothapfel of The RIALTO, New 
York's finest Moving Picture Theatre, booked this 
production for a week's run. After having reviewed 
it Mr. Rothapfel confirmed his judgment by spoken 
words of congratulations. STATE RIGHTS NOW 
SELLING. Communications given attention in or- 
der of their receipt. Address, 

LOIS WEBER, STATE RIGHTS DEPARTMENT 
3rd Floor, 1600 Broadway, New York City. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY 

In association with 

WORLD PICTURES 

Presents 

ALICE BRADY 



w 



"Darkest Russia 

Directed by T ravers Valo 

From the play by H. Grattavn Donnelly and Sidney R. Ellis 




HB 



The Story, the Cast and Staging — all reflect the high character of the production. It is Not a sex play — it is a story 
that asks the question: "ARE THE FORCES OF GOOD STRONGER THAN THE FORCES OF EVIL?" The Cast 
includes: Sheldon Lewis, who starred in die Iron Claw; Walter Hampden, who starred in the Servant in the House; 
Charlotte Ives, now starring in the Moroeco Broadway hit. The Brat; Marie Shotwell, appearing in Enlighten Thy 
Daughter; Harry Benham, of the Million Dollar Mystery, and Theodore Friebna, for years the idol at the Castle 
Square Theatre, Boston. 

The feature was produced and directed by EDWARD WARREN, maker of many successful state right attractions. 
The scenario is by Lawrence Marston. 

Write or wire bids for territorial rights to H. Z. LEVlNE, Business Manager 



edvoard Barren 




imim ii iiiiiiiMi i iiii i iiiiiiii i iMiia ii iiiii i ffl 



1482 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 

BJSBmss jasssssssassssss s flBBi^ 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 4, 191? 



ATTENTION 

Moving Picture, Circus Outfits 
and Others. 

Owing to Automobiles succeeding Coaches as means of transportation in 
the Yellowstone Park, the Yellowstone Park Transportation Co. have left 
on then hands upwards of $200,000 of Concord Coaches of 7, 8, 9, 11, 24 and 
32 Passenger carrying capacity; Glenns Falls Surreys, Park, and Mountain 
Wagons of 3, 5, 7 and 11 passenger carrying capacity, and a corresponding 
number of sets of Harness and 'Harness and Coach Extras. All Coaches 
and Harness are of the celebrated Concord make, now impossible to obtain. 

All Vehicles and Harness are in first class condition. We are anxious to 
dispose of this outfit quickly and will do so without regard to cost. To 
any party or parties who can make use of them we will name prices, deliv- 
ered on cars at Gardiner, Montana, that will surely prove an inducement. 

For additional particulars, prices, etc., address 

YELLOWSTONE PARK TRANSPORTATION CO. 

Helena, Montana 



«*I Can't Stand It, lVo Way I Try" 

and 

••DoIiV tne R-A-T»» 

Are now released to the profession. 
Professional copies and orcnestratione, 5c to cover mailing cost 

Will Carroll Co., Inc., Selling Agta., 8 4th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



AT LIBERTY 



ILR0Y ELKINS 

Leads and Bceond Business. Axe 25. weight 160. 
height S ft. 10. Sir year* stock and rep. experi- 
ence. Jttit closed 31 WEEKS. Can Jolo on wile. 



ROSE MILLEN 

Ingenae. Leads and Second Btudneu. Age 23, 
height S ft 4%, weight 124; 4 jean' experience 
with Walter Darts Stock. 



Address ELSOT KT.KIS8, 88 Waters Are., West Everett, Haas. 



RUTH 



BARNEY 



NOBLE b NORTON 

A BREEZE FROM MUSICAL COMEDY 

Direction IRVING COOPER 



FOR STYLE AND PRICE VISIT THE 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 

A Trial WW Convince YOU 

X FE1GEK9AUM &. FELIX YOUNG, Mara. 

MS W. 45th St, Suite 7K, New York 



Bryant 



ALLIANCE HOTEL, 

258 Wast 44th Street, New York City 

JCAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. «S Seconds from Broadway. Professional 
here high-class a<Tr nn- a o da ti o u a and service at reasonable prices. TeL Bryant 



le wiO 



SONG WRITERS ^£$g£? % *£££££ 

PERFORMERS ROBT. "h. BRENNEN. 1433 Broadway, N.Y. 



TENNEY 



liia the Parcel Poet "delivers tie coeds." Acts, sketches, sad monologues, written 
right. They're foil of originality, "pep" and "get-ever." Don't wish for a GOOD 
act. tare Tenner write job ens. Correspondence solicited. 

AT.T.TflT SPESCEB VJJHUET, Ho. 1493 Broadway, How York City. 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY 



m 



<t 



Jests & Jigs 

BY TOMMY GRAY 



•» 



• Invite all Singm* Merabtrs e. the Theiincil Profession to Exani'ie an JUsor.Tr.enl of 

GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



c U-. KNICKERBOCKER HARMONYSTUDIOS 1 



Lady Partner (Bet 30-40) 

Wanted who can sing, play piano oe dance a la 
Irish or Scotch rl lng. Will teach. State particu- 
lars. VAUDEVILLE, can Clipper. 



Partner Wanted for Musical Ad 

By os, man orchestra playing 7 instroments et 
one time. Must play plana Lady or gent. Ad- 
dress "H. 8.," care of Clipper, 



GRACE & ADELE FOX 

Anna Mae Cooney and Delia Cooney 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



AGENTS 

GET THE LATEST 

Make Big Money Selling; 

Photo - Handled Knives 

for Punch Boards 

Knives msde with the lstest real 
ART. SEPTEM BER M O RN, JESS 
yyn .T.Awr> and OTHEB ATTRACT- 
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M4M3TACTUBEE3 AND DIS- 
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KNIVES FOR PUNCH BOARDS 
A ND RA FFL E C ARDS IN THE 
UNITED STATES. Write ni and 
we will see that yon are promptly 
supplied. ' Ask for catalogue and 
terms today. 

GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

SIS Bo. Sheldon St. Dent. 58 Chicago 

Central Fibre Wardrobe 
$35.00 

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average $60.00 

wardrobe ud 

6UARANTHD 

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PhOa. 

Telephone 8560 Bryant. 

Hydro Electric Baths 

Candler Bide., 

220 West 42d St Room 565 

ltonlc Bitti, 11.00. Inspection BoUdted. 

Hours Cor men, 10 a. m. to 8 p. ill. 

tidies by appointment. 
Telephone 1T45 Bryant 

«J. SCHIERING 

EXPERIMENTAL WORK 

Special attention to theatrical ant. 344 W. 43d sl. 
BE 8th sod Sth Ana., Nee Tort 




OFFICIAL KI \P A 
DOCTOR Pie Ve A. 

Dr. William FL Goldberg 

SO WEST Orel STREET 
TeL »t Schuyler NEW YORK 



Phone Lenox 9977. 

A. SCHROTTM AN 

117 East 71th SU New York 

Theatrical Upholsterer 

Recommended by all leading theatres. Re 
upholstering and repairing theatre chairs a 
specialty — Slip Covers for Summer. 




STAYS Ml 

Cast a east esarofel 
Card for SO vein by Stan of Ihs Fiu n-a u aa. 

for free EX0BA samples. CHAELE8 sCETES. 

[eat. 18*8] 1-8 a Uth BL. rirr To* 



WANTED 

Manvllle Bros. Stock Co. under canTaa — Man, gtn. 
buslneas, specialties or doable In band; cleTer. 
general bnalneu woman with specialties. Ma- 
tddanm, actora write. Behearaala April 24. Sbow 
ope ns In ILL, week stand, rep* Address CHAS. 
1L4HVTXLE, 776 *^*""" St., Apple-ten. Wis. 



THE NEW HOME OF 

BUSCil & WINZCLBERG CO. 
Theatrical 

Costumes 

229-231 Wert 42d St, New York 



Maximum of quality and minimum os 

price. The largest and moat aucccn- 

foil producer, are our r e feren ce a. 

Special attatarjem paid to Acts a* 

well as PredoctioBa 
TeL 748b Bryant EatabUahed UK 

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Telepho n es B W S-OeHl Bryant. 

liberty Construction Co. 

P. O'BOUBKB AND P. LENNON. 

New and Second Band SCENERY. PBOPERTLEB. 

AND LUMBER, STAGE ELECTRIC 

APPLIANCES. 

Liberty Theatre, 8*1 West 47th SU, New York 

Everything need by "Birth of a Nation" and 

'•Intolerance" furnished by as. 



DOG AND CAT DEPARTMENT 

NEW YORK 

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120 West 25th Sl, New York 

Telephone 9609 Farragut 
EatabUahed 30 Years Booklet oa Request 




NEW 
NEW 
NEW 

Filled with original sure-fire comedy material 
and Including acts of all descriptions. NOT 
A JOKE BOOK bat an eJesaat, up-to-date en- 
cyclopedia of laoshs. FUNNYBONB No. S 
contains s new monologue. "The Pair Sex"; 
aa act for two males, "Two Sons of Uncle 
Bam**; an act for male aad female, "My 
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parodies on late aonc hits: CO fancy gaga: 
also stage poems, etc. Bememher. the price 
of PUNNYBONE No. 8 la only 85 cents; or 
win send any two Issues for 80 cents,' any 8 
for 75 cents, any 4 for $1; or rUNNYBONEB 
1. 2. 8, 4 and 5 for 81.25. rUMaiBOSZ 
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WANTED 

TOP TENOR 

Who plays cornet; also a tenor soloist who 
plays corset or baritone, for immediate en- 

Sgement and summer season in New York 
ty. Must be able to deliver goods. Wire 
salary, height and weight. ROLFE A MAO- 
DOCK. 1482 Broadway. New Yarfc City. 

once for. HUMAN HEARTS 

Woman for Both (Ingenue) with specialty, street 
drummer to doable stage, heavy to doable Governor 
and man for Tom Logan. Preference to those 
doubling in band. Address C. R. RXHO, Rniehar- 
hoekar Theatre Building, 1401 Broadway, Raw 
York, by mail only. • 



AX LIBERTY 
C. A. ROYCE 

Juveniles, Heavies and Gen. Bus. 
Jeffersonville, N. Y., Gen. DeL 



SONGWRITERS 



KNICKERBOCKER STUDlOSjrr Gaiety Theatre BaMas, N. T. CHr 




April 4, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 




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STAGE TRAINING 

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studied under Mr. Alxlene: Annette Kel- 
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and others. Write for catalogue men- 
tioning' study drslred. 

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what goods are wanted. 

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LAWYERS. 
F. L Boyd, Attorney, 17 - N. La Salle St.. 

Chicago. . _ 

E J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicigo, HL 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 
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°SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
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Wis. 

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SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
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phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
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THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
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TRANSFERS 
Walton, 455 W. 33d St., N. Y." 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobso n. 910 Prospect Ave.. N. V. C 

Phtm. Bry«itjf«|5 

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Theatrical Acrobatic Apparatus 
Experimental Work 



332 West 41st St., 



New York 



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TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH 4% CO. 

Ill N. Ninth St.. PbllsdaiphU 



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Fall Dre 1 1, Taxed o -J Prinec Albert Suits 
LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St., Chicago 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written ts 
song poems. W. H. NELSON, Astor Theatre 
BIdg.. 1531 Hroadwsy. N. Y. 

For STRtH aad STAGE WtAl 

Made to order from 15 to |10t 
We Specialise Id Stock Wlfft. 



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poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music for new authors, and assists publication. 

Send your poem, or complete songs. ST...K 

1900. Suite 505, Astor Theatre BIdg.. 45th and 
Broadway. N. Y. 



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APRIL 11, 1917 



PRICE TEN CENTS 




THE NATIONAL THEATRICAL WEEKLY 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



ADELE OSWOLD 



SUGGESTS HER 



CHARACTER CONCERT 

"The Woman Of It* 




THE CABARET LADY 



THE WAR WOMAN 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 185J 



NEW YORK, APRIL 11, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. 10 
Price, Ten Cents 



WAR CLOSES 

SIX HILL 

SHOWS 

TWO WEEKS' NOTICE GIVEN 



Gub Hill has ordered six of bis shows 
closed on account of the war. He had 
originally intended operating these com- 
panies until the latter part of May, but 
when the beginning of hostilities was an- 
nounced, he immediately instructed his 
managers to post a two weeks' notice. 

The shows that are to close and the 
locality in which they terminate their sea- 
son are, "Bringing Up Father No. 1," 
Sonth Bend, Ind., April. 22; "Bringing Up 
Father, No. 2." Hornell, N. Y., April 21 ; 
"Hans and Fritz." Baltimore, April 21; 
"Happy Hooligan's Honeymoon," Philadel- 
phia, April 14 ; "Mutt and Jeff, No. 1," 
Mount Vernon, N. V , April 28, and "Mutt 
and Jeff, No. 2," Cumberland, Md., 
April 28. 

Mr. Hill has more than two hundred 
people employed in these shows, and most 
of them anticipated continuing their en- 
gagements until the end of next month. 
The Happy Hooligan show will close after 
a short season of ten weeks, while the 
ether attractions have been - out from 
twenty to thirty-five weeks. In explaining 
the reason for closing his shows Mr. Hill 
said: 

"With the sudden declaration of war. 
the press of the country has printed stories 
to the effect that the public should econom- 
ize, as hard times might be expected in 
the near future. This statement and the 
excitement which naturally will ensue with 
the beginning of hostilities would keep 
people's minds and desires away from 
amusement and pleasure and the first to 
feel this would be the theatres. So, in 
anticipation of these conditions, I feel 
that thin would be the proper time to sus- 
pend operations of my attractions for the 
season." 

Mr. Hill also stated that he would hold 
all his plans for next season in abeyance 
until the early part of July. He had con- 
templated producing fifteen shows next sea- 
son, but will not decide upon them until 
the mid-summer month arrives. 



K. & E. HAVE NEW PLAY 

Klaw & Erlanger, in association with 
George C. i Tyler, will produce a new 
romedy by Booth Tarkington & Julian 
Street at the Broad Street Theatre, Phila- 
delphia on April 23. 'The play is in re- 
hearsal at present under the direction of 
Robert Milton. In the cast are Alexandra 
Carlisle, Phoebe Foster, Edith Barker, 
Noel Haddon, Alice Putnam. Julia Street, 
Eugene O'Brien, Donald . Gallagher. Regi- 
nald Mason, George Howell, Louis Halle tt, 
Robert Adams and George Wright, Jr. 

LONDON LUCES "INTOLERANCE" 

According to advices received from Lon- 
don, the receipts for the opening per- 
formance' of "Intolerance," at the Dnrry 
Lane Theatre, but Saturday were *2,200. 
The dispatch states that the picture was 
such a succesH that D. W. Griffith was 
compelled, to make a speech at the conclu- 
sion of the performance. 



WAR MAY KEEP CONEY DARK 

It was reported about town early this 
week that the seashore vaudeville season 
this year would not start, or, in other 
words, the various seashore theatres would 
not open on account of war activities.. The 
Brighton Beach Theatre and the New 
Brighton Theatre are away behind in their 
bookings, and Henderson's Coney Island 
and Morrison's Rockaway have not an act 
booked for the summer time. These thea- 
tres play big time vaudeville and are 
usually booked early as they remain open 
but ten weeks. 

Carlton Hoagland books Henderson's 
and has as yet not booked a single act for 
the Coney Island house, and Johnny Col- 
lins, who books the New Brighton, has 
but few acts booked. The stopping of the 
running of boats to Rockaway and Coney 
Island after six p. m. will also be a handi- 
cap to the theatres, as most of the travel- 
ing, will have to be done by rail. The 
Atlantic City house will open in a few 
weeks according to schedule. 

GEORGE SCOTT INJURED 

George W. Scott, of the team of Scott 
and Marke, also the producer of several 
successful vaudeville acts, while crossing 
the road at Bayside, L. I., Thursday night, 
was Htruck by an automobile, knocked 
down and run over, the auto never stop- 
ping. When Scott came to, be managed 
to reach his home, where three sitches were 
taken in his head. Mr. Scott is now con- 
fined to bis bed, while detectives are trying 
to find out who was driving the car 



N. Y. FLIVVER MAKES MONEY 
San Francisco, April 9.— "The High 
High Cost Of Loving," in which Lew 
Fields starred two seasons ago in New 
York, but failed to win public favor, is 
in its sixth week at the Alcazar Theatre, 
this city, with Kolb and Dill in the lead- 
ing roles. The attraction is doing such big 
business that plans have been made to con- 
tinue the engagement for at least three 
months. 



TAB. GETTING $2.00 PRICES 

Toronto, Can., April 7. — "Rube Howe's 
Dairy Maids," a tabloid production, is 
booked through the extreme Western part 
of Canada, all two weeks' stands at top- 
notch prices — 60 cents, $1 and $2, and 
playing on a 60-60 basis. This is the only 
tabloid company in the country playing to 
I'ig production prices. Turn-away business 
prevails. 

ACTRESS LOSES IN LOVE SUIT 
San Francisco, April 3. — Judge Mu- 
rasky last week granted a judgment of 
$5,000 to Mrs. Nellie Roche against Paul- 
ine Lord, the actress, for alienating the 
affections of her husband. Billy Roche, the 
former well known prize fight referee. 



ODETTE MYRTIL MARRIED 

London, April 9. — Bob Adams, of The 
Two Bobs, who are in England, was mar- 
ried last month in London to Odette Myrtil, 
who does a singing and violin act and was 
formerly at the "Midnight Frolic" in New 
York. 



RAY COX TO HAVE OWN SHOW 

Ray Cox, who has been considering sev- 
eral vaudeville, offers since her return from 
England, has practically decided to rest 
until the early autumn, when, it is re; 
ported, she will appear at the head of a 
musical show of her own. 



GERMAN ACTS 

FEAR WAR'S 

EFFECT 

MANAGERS ASSURE FAIRNESS 



German vaudevillians and Dutch co- 
medians in this country appear to be 
alarmed over the attitude that audiences 
and managers may assume toward them 
now that the United States has become 
embroiled in war with the Teuton nations, 
if comments made by several can be ac- 
cepted as typical. Although, at the pres- 
ent time, such performers are meeting 
with no unpleasant experiences to speak 
of, - many of them seem to fear that a 
change of public attitude will appear be- 
fore long, in which case the German per- 
former is going to find the road a hard 
one. 

It seems possible that the people of the 
United States may resent . being enter- 
tained by those who remind them of their 
enemies and will ultimately assert their 
feelings in the matter. This state of af- 
fairs was brought into being in Canada 
almost at the outbreak of hostilities, and 
but few German acts have played Canada 
in the past few years on either the "Loew 
or United Booking Offices Circuits. A few 
Dutch comedians have played Canadian 
houses with more or less success on the 
Orpheum Circuit, such as Raymond and 
Caverly, Milt Collins and Harry Lester 
Mason, but their material has probably 
been greatly modified in this 'territory. 
And such acts have been few and far be- 
tween. 

E. F. Albee, when interviewed in refer- 
ence to the attitude of the United Rook- 
ing Offices toward German acts, assured 
The Clipper that war would make no 
difference whatever as far as the feelings 
of any of the managers employing Ger- 
man acts on their circuits was concerned. 
The greatest consideration will be given - 
them in every particular tinder the pres- 
ent stress, he declared, and orders have 
already gone out to the various managers 
doing business in the United Booking Of- 
fices that nothing shall be said or done in 
any way to irritate the present conditions 
by any of the employees of the theatres, 
and not to allow any discussions as to the 
merit of either side in or about the 
theatres. 

Joseph M. Schenck, of the Loew offices. 
admitted that no German acts were play- 
ing Loew time in Canada. He said that 
Canadian theatregoers did not wish to 
see these acts, and that the Loew Circuit 
was abiding by their wishes. Mr. Schenck 
said that he saw no reason at the present 
time for taking any action with reference 
to German acts in the United States. 

He intimated, however, that if the time 
should come when the theatre audiences 
of this country showed that they did not 
wish these acts, the Loew interests would 
take immediate action, believing in the 
advisability of keeping their ear to the 
ground and catering to the public's de- 
sires. 

B. S. Moss seemed to largely share 
Schenck's opinion but made it. clear that 
there would be. no change in the Moss pol- 
icy at the present time. 



BELL DELAYS TICKET ORDER 

After a conference with theatre man- 
agers last week, relative to the enforcement 
of the rule compelling theatres to print 
the box office value on the stub of a ticket, 
mid also post in Hie l<ibt>y of theatres 
the prevailing scale of prices of admission. 
Commissioner of Licenses George II. Bell 
Iiub deferred the enforcement of the order 
until Fall. The managers told the com- 
missioner they hnd had their tickets 
printed and distributed eight weeks in ad- 
vance and consequently it would work a 
hardship upon them if the rule were to be 
enforced May 1, as plnnncd. 



NEW THEATRE CALLED WILSON 

The Wilson Theatre is to be the name 
of the new house which is being con- 
structed by B. 8. Moss nt Broadway and 
One Hundred and Eighty-first Street It 
is expected that it will be completed in 
time to open next Thanksgiving liny. The 
estimated cost of construction and equip- 
ment of this house, which will sent :i.000 
persons, is close to $1,000,000. 

"UNDER PRESSURE" PRODUCED 

Atlantic City, April 9. — "tTnder Pres- 
sure," Sydney Rosenfeld's latest comedy, 
was produced at the Apollo Theatre here 
to-night under the direction of Cohan &■ 
Harris. The company includes Fred Niblo. 
Olive Tell, H. Cooper-Cliffe. Percy Ames. 
Grace Ellisten, Madge Paxton, Mary Ram- 
sey, Zeffie Tilbury and John Findley. 



BEl.ASCO-WOODS CASE TODAY 
The hearings before Referee Laconib iu 
the action instituted by the A. H. Woods 
Productions, Inc., against David Iielosco. 
to restrain him from producing a play of 
the Northwest, which it is alleged won 
written by Willard Mack, will begin today. 
They are to be held in Itcferee Lncomb'a 
office and are to be private. 



MEMPHIS MANAGERS CHANGE 

Memphis. Ajiril 9. — Fred Weis hag as- 
sumed active management of I/owe's Ly- 
ceum Theatre, With Benj. M. Stninbaek as 
assistant manager. Arthur Mosknwitz, 
who has been in charge of the theatre, will 
leave h<»re on the 15tb of April, to take 
charge of the Birmingham house. 

HOWARD BURKHARDT SICK 

Howard Burkhardt, assistant treasurer 
of Hurtig &, Seamon's burlesque theatre, 
has been confined to his home with an at- 
tack of the grippe for the past ten days. 
Danny Davenport is being assisted in the 
box office during Riirkhardt's absence by 
Manager Lou Hurtig. 



TREASURER MILNE PROMOTED 
Jersey City. X. J.. April 9. — William 
Milne, who has been treasurer of Keith's 
Theatre, this city, for the last three years, 
has been appointed manager of the house 
and assumed, the duties of bis new position 
to-day. ' 



"SOLDIER BOY' TO MOVE 

"Her Soldier Boy" will move from the 
Astor Theatre to the Lyric. April 80, and 
may be succeeded by "His Little Widows." 
"The Honor System" leaves the Lyric, 
April 28. 



COLLINS AND HART ENGAGED 

Collins and Hart, acrobatic eomiques, 
have been added to the cast of "The Pass- 
ing Show of 1917," which will be presented 
at the Winter Garden later in the month: 



the: hew ywmt clipper 



April 11, 1917 



MEN OF STAGE 
PREPARE TO 

TAKE ARMS 

WOMEN ALSO ZEALOUS PATRIOTS 



No class of individuals has been quicker 
to respond to President Wilson's war 
proclamation and to show their willing- 
ness to render material aid to Uncle Sam, 
giving their lives, if need be, than those 
in and associated with the theatrical pro- 
fusion. From the best known stars down 
to the most obscure ushers, have come 
offers of service, and theatrical Broadway 
has taken on a tinge of militarism of 
which actors and managers may be justly 
proud. ^ 

It is estimated that there are more than . 
one hundred thousand men in the United 
States who earn their livelihood in the 
theatre, and prominent members of the 
theatrical world are trying to effect a means 
by which the theatrical community will be 
enabled to form a separate and distinct 
unit in America's fighting forces. 

Lee Shubert, who is anxious to prove 
that "the people of the theatre have al- 
ways responded nobly to a call for the 
defense of the country and will now prove 
just as patriotic and just as enthusiastic 
to answer President Wilson's call for vol- 
unteers," announces that he is willing to 
help equip a regiment to be recruited from 
the theatrical forces of the country. Alf 
Hayman, of the Charles Frohman offices, 
has suggested that each New York theatre 
furnish, equip and man one automobile 
for home defense, and this plan will most 
likely be carried into effect. 

John Pollock has Bounded the call to 
arms for the Friars. "I want sixty red- 
blooded, able bodied Friars," he says, "to 
join me in the organization of a Friars' 
machine gun company. If there are 120 
such Friars, we will have two machine 
gun companies. I am not seeking pub- 
licity, but men." 

The Lambs' Club have a squad of mem- 
bers training daily on Staten Island. 

The Hippodrome has lost thirty of its 
property men by enlistment since the 
President's address to Congress and the 
same proportion of its uniformed force. 

The ushers at the Empire Theatre have 
been organized into a. squad by Stephen 
Thornton and drill for a half hour every 
evening before the doors of the theatre are 
opened. 

The members of the International Alli- 
ance of Theatrical Stage Employees are 
organizing a military unit aqd estimate 
that there will be more than five thou- 
sand soldiers in the company. Three 
thousand drill hooks have been distributed 
to the members at meetings and through 
the mails. 

The Authors' League, in which are en- 
rolled many playwrights, has decided to 
wield its mighty pen and to instill patriot- 
ism through the writings of its members. 

The women of the theatre are ably ac- 
cepting their share of the burden and mil 
organize into a war relief society at a 
monster mass meeting to be held at the 
Hudson Theatre on Friday. This organ- 
ization is the first concerted movement of 
the women of the American stage in be- 
half of the country. It will be known as 
the War Relief of the Women of the 
American Theatre. Rachel Crothers is the 
national chairman. Among other active 
workers are Mrs. Henry B. Harris, Eliza- 
beth Marbury, Elsie De" Wolfe, Mrs. Coffin 
Van Rensselaer and Mary Hatch Willard. 

Offering her services to the aviation 
branch of the United States government, 
Gloria Goodman, of the "Love o' Mike" 
company, has gained the distinction of 
being the first aviatrix to volunteer. 

The moving picture workers have been 
no less patriotic than their brothers and 
sisters of the speaking stage. 

Two hundred and fifty employees of the 
Greater Vitagraph Company have formed 
a drill squad for national and home de- 
fense under the direction of Cant. G. W. 
Johnston, N. G. N. T. William J. Bryan 
was the first recruit to enroll. 



MATINEE CROWDS POLICED 
On account of the congested condition 
of the Times Building Arcade and the 
Biker & Hegeman drug store lobby caused 
by people who have made appointments 
to meet friends prior to and after mati- 
nees, uniformed policemen have been de- 
tailed to keep the place clear. The police- 
men were placed there last week on 
Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday after- 
noons by Police Captain Underbill after 
complaints made by the drug people and 

the owners of the building who said that 
the ingress and egress of their patrons 
and tenants was interfered with by the 
crowds. The policing, will continue until 
the people learn that they are not per- 
mitted to loiter in the building, i 



HENDERSONS TO OPEN THEATRE 

The Henderson Players plan opening 
the New York Repertory Theatre in No- 
vember of this year. A site has been 
selected on West Forty-fifth Street, be- 
tween Sixth Avenue and Broadway, and 
among others who are vitally interested 
in the project are Messrs. Winchell Smith, 
Walter Pritchard Eaton, Marc Klaw, 
Maurice V. Samuels, O. P. Heggie and 
Dr. P. A. Levine. 



OPENING OF "LITTLE MISSUS" 
"The Little Missus," the A. E. Thomas- 
Paul Eislex musical play, which is the ve- 
hicle in which Christie MacDonald will re- 
turn to the stage, will be given its first 
performance April 19 at Atlantic City. The 
cast will include Grace Leon Moore, Roy 
Atwell, Edwin Wilson, Frank Bradley and 
Paulina French. 



JOSEPHINE FIELD IN ASYLUM 

Josephine Field, wife of George I. Field, 
property man of the Royal Theatre, is in 
the State Institution at Elgin, 111., being 
treated for a nervous breakdown followed 
by loss of reason. 'She has made many ap- 
pearances upon the stage and was last seen 
in Arthur Hopkins' "More Sinned Against 
Than Usual." 



ACTORS ELECT SUPERVISOR 

Through the vote of the actors' colony, 
Horace B. Smith has been elected super- 
visor in Freeport, L. I., defeating Ernest 
R. Randell for the office. In his campaign 
Randell advocated prohibition. "The 
Lights," a theatrical club with four hun- 
dred members, has its headquarters at 
Freeport. 



LYDIA'S DAUGHTER ACTING 

Zeffie Tilbury, who is appearing in 
"Under Pressure" this week in Atlantic 
City, is the daughter of Lydia Thompson, 
who, forty years ago, toured the United 
States at the head of her own burlesque 
company presenting "Babes in the Wood" 
and other burlesques of English origin. 



STAGE HANDS PATRIOTIC 

The members of No. 1 Local of the In- 
ternational Alliance of Theatrical Stage 
Employees decided, last week, at their 
weekly meeting to exempt those who en- 
listed for war from the payment of dues 
during their terms of service. 



GREEN ROOM HONORS MOROSCO 

A beefsteak dinner and rehearsal was 
held Sunday evening at the Green Room 
Club in honor of Oliver Morosco. Edwards 
Davis was the prompter and Herbert 
Corthell acted as master of ceremonies. 



GARDEN SIGNS ARDATH 

Fred Ardath, who recently appeared in 
the vaudeville sketch, "The Corner Store," 
has been engaged by the Shuberts for a 
principal part in the New Wintergarden 
production. 



MARIE KELLER ILL 

Marie Keller has closed with Pepple 
and Greenwald's "All-Girl Revue" on ac- 
count of illness and has gone to her home 
at Philadelphia, Pa., for a rest. 

NEW RIZAL & AT1MA ACT 
Rizal and Atima are "canning" the new 
act produced last December and will go 
back to their old act. 



HOLY WEEK CUTS 

INTO THEATRE 

RECEIPTS 

LAST HALF VERT BAD 



The prospects for good business during 
"Holy Week," which looked rather encour- 
aging at first in the New York theatres 
did not materialize, despite the fact that 
business in the majority of houses was 
rather heavy during the fore part of the 
week. Most of the houses were well filled 
at the performances both in the afternoon 
and evening on Monday, Tuesday and 
Wednesday. However, Thursday evening 
and Friday evening the effects of the 
end if the "Lenten" season were seriously 
felt in all of the theatres, legitimate, 
vaudeville and motion pictures. 

It was believed by managers judging by 
the good business in the fore part of the 
week that little observance would be 
taken of "Good Friday," by the theatre- 
going public Those houses which had 
matinees on Thursday did an unusually 
good business, but when the time for the 
evening performances came the majority 
of the theatres along Broadway were 
hardly more than half filled. Scouts were 
sent out from the various theatres to 
ascertain what their competitors were do- 
ing and returned with reports of bad busi- 
ness all along the line.. 

The attendance at the vaudeville houses 
and motion picture places along Broadway 
was unusually heavy at the Friday mati- 
nee, but the night business in these the- 
atres, as well as in the legitimate houses, 
fell way off. 

What greatly hurt the business in the 
theatres during the last part of the week 
was the' fact .that the Jewish "Feast of 
Passover" commenced on Friday night 
and, therefore, " preparations were being 
made on Thursday for this occasion. 

On Saturday, the business in all Broad- 
way houses, both at matinee and evening 
performances, assumed its normal pro- 
portions. 



STANLEY CO. TO BUILD THEATRE 

Philadelphia, April 8. — The Stanley 
Corporation is about to award a contract 
for the erection of an immense moving pic- 
ture theatre to cost $400,000 at the south- 
west corner of Nineteenth and Market 
Streets. The building, designed by the 
Hoffman Company, will be of fireproof 
construction, occupying an area of 120 by 
200 feet. The seating capacity will be up- 
wards of 4,000. 



SHUBERTS WANT PHILA. HOUSE 
Philadelphia, April 8. — Both the Shu- 
bert and S. F. Nixon interests are looking 
for sites for the erection of new playhouses. 
.Mr. Nixon loses the Forrest after next 
season as a trust company has bonght the 
lot for a huge office building. The Shu- 
berts have been here several times looking 
over the various sites. 



FRISCO •'PLAYERS" BUSY 

San Fbamcisco, Cal.. April 7. — The 
Players Club, San Francisco's "little the- 
atre" organization, is producing this week: 
Ernest Dowson's "Pierrot of the Minute," 
"Mitsuo," a Japanese drama of the 
"Bnshide" type; "Suicide," a near farce 
by a local writer; and "Neighbors." 



' - IN A CLAIRE TO MARRY 

Ina Claire, musical comedy star, is to 
be married shortly to Lieut. Lawrence 
Townsend, Jr., U. S. N. Miss Claire re- 
cently signed ' with David Belasco to star 
under his direction on the dramatic stage 
next season. 



MICHIGAN MANAGERS ORGANIZE 

Battle Cheek, Mich., April 6. — Pursu- 
ant to an invitation by George Black, local 
manager of the Post Theatre, managers of 
nearly' all the theatres in central Michigan 
met, last week, at the Post Tavern and 
formulated an association. The organiza- 
tion will probably be known as the Michi- 
gan Theatre Managers' Association, and 
will have as a platform the bettering of 
adverse conditions, such as questionable 
attractions, unsanitary theatres, the better 
care of professionals at hotels, and a united 
effort to attract the very best shows by 
offering extended bookings over a long cir- 
cuit. 

The next meeting will be held at Jackson, 
Mich., within the coming two weeks, at 
which time officers win be elected and a 
constitution and by-laws will be adopted. 
Subsequent meetings will be- held monthly 
at different cities. It is expected that at 
least twenty-five cities will ultimately be 
affiliated. 



WEAR PATRIOTIC SHIELDS 
R. Alfred Jones, manager of the Strand 
Theatre, has designed and had affixed to 
the sleeves of all the- house uniformed em- 
ployees a unique and attractive s hi e ld 
with the American flag stitched on it. 



"DE LUXE ANNIE" READY 

"De Luxe Annie," a comedy dramatized 
by Edward Clark from Sea mm on Lock- 
wood's story of the same name, will receive 
its initial production April 30 at the Shu- 
bert Theatre, New Haven, Conn., with a 
cast including Rita Jolivet, Robert Me- 
Wade, Vincent Serrano, Frank Gilmore and 
Mary Hall , It is under the direction of 
Arthur Hammerstein and Lee Shubert and 
will be seen in New York early next sea- 
son. 



GEORGE BARNUM BACK 

Geo. W. Barnum, the stage director, re- 
turned to New York last Wednesday sifter 
a two years' stay in Australia, staging 
plays for the J. C. Williamson, Ltd. 
"Under Fire," "Potash and Perlmutter," 
"Under Cover," "Romance M and twenty 
other plays were staged by 'him during 
his stay. Mr. Barnum, on his return, sur- 
prised many of his friends with the an- 
nouncement that he had married an 
Australian lady a year ago. 

ROSENBERG MUST PAY 

Walter Rosenberg lost in a suit brought 
against him by the Shubert Theatrical Co. 
last week to recover $825, with interest, 
which the Shuberts said Rosenberg owed 
them for some chairs which he bad pur- 
chased. The court decided that Rosenberg 
must pay the full amount, $919. 



LOLA MERRILL ILL IN BOSTON 

Lola Merrill was obliged to leave the 
"Hit the Trail Holliday" Co. at Kansas 
City and return to her home in Boston, 
where she is now under medical care. Au- 
gusta Gardner took her place with the 
show, which closes April 21 at Auburn, 
Ind. 



WOODS GETS "SCRAP OF PAPER" 

A. H. Woods has acquired the rights of 
"The Scrap of Paper," Arthur Summers 
Roche's serial story which ran in the Satur- 
day Evening Pott, and Owen Davis is 
adapting it for the stage. It will be known 
on the stage as "Loot" 



PLAY INJUNCTION ARGUED 

A motion for an injunction restraining 
Commissioner of Licenses George H. Bell 
from interfering with the presentation of 
"The Awakening of Spring," was argued 
before Justice MitcheU Erlanger in the 
Supreme Court last Thursday and deci- 
sion was reserved. 



EASTPORT TO HAVE THEATRE 

Eastfobt, Me., April 7. — A modern 
opera house is soon to be erected on Wash- 
ington street, this city. The matter has 
been under advisement for several years, 
but has now progressed to the stage of 
having the architect's plans passed, upon 



SIXTH THEATRE FOR CRANDALL 

Washington, D. C, April 5. — Harry 
M. Crandall announces that he will build 
his sixth theatre in this city at the comer 
of Tenth, and F. Streets. Contracts have 
been let, and the enterprise calls for si 
total expenditure, of $800,000. . 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



RINGLING'§ NEW 

SHOW GALAXY 

OF STARS 

ROYAL OPE NING IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, April 9.— The Ringling Bros. 
World's Greatest Shows started its thirty- 
fourth annual season at the Coliseum, CM- 
caco, last Saturday afternoon. Those who 
know the Hinging brothers and their 
metoric career realize that, in making this 
show favorably stand the test of precedent, 
they "had to go some." 

To begin with, Miss Leitzel, who proved 
a bright, particular star in previous years, 
is no longer. With the aggregation, as she 
is now prominently featured with the Bar- 
num & Bailey organization. Her absence 
made it necessary for some great star to 
rise to the occasion, and May Wirth, of the 
famed Australian family of that name, has 
more than fulfilled stellar expectation with 
her marvelous feats in bareback riding. 
The hackneyed and conventional hold no 
charm for this girl phenom., and her orig- 
inally conceived "basket" feat, when she 
mounts her horse on the fly with each 
dainty foot encased in an awkward basket, 
forms a fitting finale to her many other 
feats of daring. 

"Cinderella." the stupendous opening 
spectacle, which, with its well-drilled MR 
let and faithfully portrayed scenes, prov«ri 
such a tremendous success last year, again 
provides the first section of the entertain- 
1 nient. 

,The circus bill proper contains so many 
' awe-inspiring acts that they may be re : 
* viewed only in a most cursory manner. 
t'TJiere is the nsual duo-staged aerial pro- 
gram. Many feats of horsemanship are 
: next shown, May Wirth being given the 
f centre of the stage- and sometimes being 
i permitted to be the sole entertainer in 
I,, the vast arena. 

I 'Then th> Le Monts, speed mechanics, 
'who dexterously assemble an automobile 
[from a chaotic mass of parts, in a flash, 
I vie with . the Californians, who build 
r boxes and fill them with oranges in a 
■jiffy, for first honors. 

The Reckliesa Trio, the original act of 
• this name,, do daring double trapeze work, 
while Hillary Long shows the ultra pos- 
sibilities of head-balancing, ending with a 
breath-taking slide. 

After various oriental athletic exhibi^. 
tions, followed by an elaborate dog «nd , . 
; monkey show, the Lloyds perform astoupec ? ? 
', ing equestrian feats. 

Zest is given the concluding portion of 
-.the entertainment by Mijares, who still 
I stands un equaled as a wire walker, closely 
i seconded in his eccentric achievements by 
j bis brother. At the same time, the Wilson- 
Aubrey trio do horizontal bar ..work -ex— - 
traordinary. 

Wild and reckless riding then holds the 
boards. It is followed by capably-executed 
•teeth" work. 

All kinds of wild riding, including the 
indispensable chariot race, conclude the 
great list of attractions. ■ .-■';''.. 

This year's menagerie holds a special in- 
terest, because it is well-known that the 
war has precluded the importation^ of rare 
animals. In spite of thia condition, the 
Ringling menagerie contains a heterogene- 
ous collection. Some of these have never 
before been seen. Others belong to species 
which are rapidly disappearing from the 
face of the earth. ■ 

Bobker Ben Ali and his fourteen Arabs 
perform remarkable, feats. Their pyramid 
work is wonderful)-' 

One of the leaser sensations was Schu- 
bert's contortioning. He has dropped all 
frills and depends upon sheer muscular 
activity. 

The Lloyds wild Cossack riding forms a 
fine concluding feature. 



UNIVERSAL WINS SUIT 

Washington, April 9. — The United 
State Supreme Court to-day affirmed the 
decision of the Federal Court in New York 
in favor of the Universal Manufacturing 
Co., and other film defendants againt the 
Motion Picture Patent Co., in the hitter's 
effort to retrict the use of certain varieties 
and makes of film with the machines they 
control by patent. 

The argument was based on the Latham 
Loop, a mechanical contrivance in the pro- 
jection machines, and on which the Patent 
Company holds the patent rights. In a 
suit brought against the Universal by the 
Patent Co., it was charged that they had 
violated the patent agreement by permit- 
ting the use of films in their projection 
machines other than those prescribed by 
the patent company. The Universal con- 
tended the machines on which the Latham 
loop was used extended only to the pro- 
jection of this contrivance and did not 
have jurisdiction over the brand of pic- 
tures that might be shown in the machine. 
In deriding the case the Supreme Court 
upheld this contention. 



RATS TO HAVE 

OWN SHOWS 

THEYJTATE 

HOUSE AT LYNN OPENS 



McKEON LOSES RAILROAD SUIT 

Holding that a railroad is not liable for 
damages to the baggage of a theatrical com- 
pany when traveling over its lines, the Ap- 
pellate Division of the Supreme Court has 
handed down a decision against John Mc- 
Keon, formerly manager of the "Broad- 
way Jones" show, in his suit against the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford Rafl- 

. ; road. The Court held that when a theatri- 

' cal company signs a release, freeing the 
company from liability, tbey shall be bound 
by that contract and the cars carrying their 
effects shall be considered as leased to the 
theatrical company for the journey. Mc- 
Keon wa6 represented by Arthur S. Dris- 

-"coll. . " James W. Carpenter appeared for 

a the railroad. . . 



FILM TAX ONLY $150,000 

Albany, April 9.— -Assemblyman Wheel- 
er, chairman of the "committee which in- 
vestigated the motion picture industry re- 
cently, - with a view 'of determining upon 
a tax* to be imposed ,on films, stated that 
'.a-'b'Ul which he will introduce in the House 
this week will call for a revenue from the 
motion picture business of an amount not 
in excess of $150,0Ck> annually. . It was 
thought here, prior to. Mr. Wheeler's state- 
ment* that the measure would ask for a 
taxation of about $1,000,000 yearly. 



... -u TICKET TAX BILL KILLED 

< A'iiANT, April 9. — An adverse report on 
the proposed measure to impose a stamp 
tax on all amusement tickets, was pre- 
sented by the Assembly Committee On 
Taxation and Retrenchment to-night. The 
committee voted against Assemblyman Cof- 
fey's measure unanimously. Practically 
every theatrical interest was represented at 
hearings held on the bill. 



GERTRUDE RITCHIE ENGAGED 

Gertrude Ritchie joined the Shubert 
stock company in Milwaukee, Wis., last 
week to play second business, opening in 
"The Little Girl That God Forgot." Paul- 
ine Lord joined the company this week 
for leads. 



IOLA THEATRE MGR. RETURNS 

Ioia, Kan., April 7. — H. B. LeVan, 
ten years ago manager of the Grand Thea- 
tre, has returned to this city to engage in 
the amusement business, and is building a 
theatre to play all the year around at- 
tractions. 



O'BRIEN GETS NEW MINSTREL 

Mobile, Ala.. April 9. — Vance D. Gun- 
nison, of this city, has signed with Neil 
O'Brien's minstrels to work on the end 
and do a monologue next season. 



NEWS MEN TO VISIT GROVE 

More than eight hundred members of the 
American Newspaper Publishers' Associa- 
tion and members of the Associated Press 
will visit Coeoanut Grove on the night of 
April 26. 

MEAD LEASES BRIGHTON CASINO 

James J. Mead, Brooklyn and Boston 
restaurateur, 



has leased the Brighton 
Beach Casino from the Robinson Amuse- 
ment Co. for a term of years. 



In an effort to combat the managers in 
other ways than walking out of theatres, 
the White Rats announced on Monday 
that they had closed negotiations to give 
a vaudeville show in the Lynn Theatre, 
Lynn, Mass., and would shortly adopt the 
same procedure in other sections of the 
country. The negotiations for this pro- 
ject were conducted by the Eastern 
Vaudeville Managers Booking Office, of 
which Byrne & Kirby are in charge. 

The theatre at Lynn opened on Monday, 
they announced, with the following acts 
on the bill: Bob Tip & Co., May Marvin, 
Johnson, Howard & Lizette, Overholt & 
Young Sisters, Keough A. Nelson, Kelly & 
Drake and Delmore. The bill for the last 
half of the week is composed of Bell & 
Caron, Patsy Doyle, The Royal Scots, 
Otto Bros., Walsh Lynch & Co., The 
Temple Quartette and Sheriffs Arabs. 

Each of these bills is to remain intact 
and is to be known as "The White Rats 
Road Show." They are to play all of the 
houses on a percentage basis, which will 
allow the performers from 60 to 70 per 
cent, of the gross receipts after the deduc- 
tion of printing and advertising expenses. 
Of this share of the gross the performers 
are to receive the regular salary that they 
have received in vaudeville theatres for 
their acts in the .past, and should there 
be any surplus over this amount it is to 
be contributed to the White Rats levy 
fund. 

It was announced at the office of Byrne 
& Kirby that four more of these road 
companies . would" commence operations 
next Monday. Each of these companies 
is to have seven acts, they said. 

The houses which are scheduled to open 
with .these! shows* next' Monday are the 
Regent -Theatre, Norwalk, Conn.; Blivens 
Opera House, Warferly, R. L; Lawlort 
Theatre, Greenfield, Mbbs., and the Audi- 
torium ). Theatre, Norwich, Conn. ; The 
CollirigWood Opera House, Pougbke'epsie, 
N. Y., is to begin playing these shows 'On 
April! 30. . y j .„ 

On!. Monday evening a benefit' per- 
formance for the 'White Rats levy, fund 
was held in th£ 'Amsterdam Opera /House. 
There were fifteen acts on the bill. Jim 
Marco was in charge of the arrangements. 
Justice Mitchell Erlanger in the Su- 
preme Court yesterday heard argument on 
the application of Marcus Loew to re- 
strain James William Fitzpatrick, Ed- 
ward Clark, Harry Mountford, George 
Delmore, Robert Henry Hodge and Arthur 
Williams, individually and as officers and 
members of the White Rats' Actors' 
Union of America, Inc., from picketing 
any of the Marcus Loew theatres, against 
which their organization has declared a 
strike. 

The argument on this motion was to 
make permanent prior to . trial, a tem- 
porary injunction which. had been granted 
by Justice Pendleton last Friday. _ In 
signing this order, the Justice specified 
that "the defendants and every and all 
persons aiding and abetting them in any 
of the acts hereinafter enjoined and re- 
strained, are restrained from in any way 
interfering with the plaintiff's property or 
business or intimidating the patrons of 
the theatre. 

William Travers Jerome argued the 
motion for the Loew people and J. J. 
Myers opposed it on behalf of the White 
Rats. Justice Erlanger reserved decision 
on the application. 

Outside of the picketing of the Loew 
theatres during the past week there has 
been no activity of the White Rats in the 
direction of other strikes in the Greater 
New York district. The business in the 
majority of the Loew houses since the 
granting of the temporary injunction by 
Justice Pendleton has assumed normal 
proportions again. 



CORINNE BARKER 

Corinne Barker, whose picture adorns 
the first page of The Clippeb, is a com- 
plete refutation of the charge that only 
the London stage possesses players 
capable of portraying ladies and gentle- 
men. 

Miss Barker this season has been acting 
the role of Clare Valon in Elsie Fergu- 
son's production of "Shirley Kaye" — a 
young society leader of New York's 
smartest set. She was chosen for this 
role by Miss Ferguson and Klaw and Er- 
langer because she absolutely represented 
the modish, clever, genteel hostess of the 
drawing room. 

Miss Barker came East three years ago 
with her mother to take up the profession 
of interior decorating. Chance, however, 
turned her attention to the stage. In a 
few weeks she was playing important 
roles, and finally was promoted to the po- 
sition of leading woman. Subsequently 
Miss Barker appeared in "Potash and 
Perlmutter," "Potash and Perlmutter in 
Society," "The Squab Farm," and more 
recently with Elsie Ferguson. 



AUTO HITS MAN; ACTRESS HELD 

Roberta Van Ellera, a vaudeville per- 
former, was held in $1,500 bail last Fri- 
day, charged with running down a man 
with her automobile the night before. The 
injured man was taken to the Harlem 
hospital suffering with a broken leg, con- 
tusions of the face and an injury to bis 
skull. 



RAIL RATE ADVANCE OFF 

The attempt of the Southern railroads 
to advance party rates for the companies 
from 2 to 2% cents per mile has been, un- 
successful, as they were not able to get a 
hearing before the Virginia . Corporation 
Commission upon their petitions. 

NEW PLAY FOR BOSTON i 

Boston, April 6.— "The Wide World" 
is the latest new play announced for pro- 
duction here. It will be presented }>fay 
-15 under the direction of William Kendall. 
Robert Knight has been engaged for a 
leading role.' V, 

ACTON GIRLS' MOTHER SICK 

Grace and Hattie Acton were called 

from Chicago to their home in Anadarko, 

Okla., last week by the serious illncat of 

their mother. The girls were with (the 

• Cora Youngblood Corson Instrumentalists. 

FIELD HAS ARTIFICIAL LAKE 

Government fish hatchery experts 'will 
begin April 20 to stock the artificial lake 
on Maple Villa Farm, N. J., which Al. G. 
Fields has had under construction for |the 
past several months. 

FRAWLEY SAILS FOR HONOLULU 

San FbAKCIBco, April 3. — T. Daniel 
Frawley, with his own dramatic company, 
sailed to-day for Honolulu, where he will 
open a week's engagement next Monday. 

AGENT'S WIFE SICK 
Mrs. Jack Henry, who manages her 
husband's booking offices, is at the home 
of her parents in Dion, N. Y., recuperat- 
ing from a severe attack of the grippe. 

MACK HAS NEW PARTNER 

II. D. Mack, of the Aerial Macks, and 
the ladv of The LafayettcB, are working 
together with the Ringling Circus under 
the name of The Aerial Macks. 

NEW PLAY FOR MERRILL AND OTTO 

Cohan and Harris have planned to star 
Lola Merrill and Frank Otto, now appear- 
ing in "Hit-tbe-Trail Holliday," in a new 
play next season. 

MacGREGOR REHEARSING "MOLLY" 

Edward McGregor has been engaged to 
rehearse the new Shubert and Frederick 
play, "The Melting of Molly." 

RUTH CURTIS IN CABARET 

Ruth Curtis haa left vaudeville for thl» 
ceason and is now appearing at the Isles- 
worth Cafe, Atlantic City, N. J. 



T«-E NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



MR. MARTIN BECK 




NS8 SARAH 








At B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE 

THIS WEEK, APRIL 9 



April ll r 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 





NEW PROVIDENCE HOUSE 

OPE NS WITH LOEW ACTS 

Amelia Bingham Heads Bill at Emery's Majestic When Up-to- 

Date Theatre Starts Career in Brilliant and 

Imposing Manner 

Providence, R. L, April 9. — With Gov. 
Beekman of Rhode Island making the dedi- 
catory speech, Emery's new Majestic Thea- 
tre was formally opened here tonight. The 
house is the largest in the city, seating 
three thousand people, fourteen hundred on 
the lower floor and sixteen hundred 

The policy of the house is Loew vaude- 
ville and high class motion pictures. The 
hend liner on the opening bill is Amelia 
Bingham & Co., in her sketch, "Big Mo- 
ments from Great Plays." The other acts 
on the bill are Norton and Earle, O'Con- 
ner and Sexton, Walton and Shellberg and 
the Four Castors. 

Every conceivable innovation has been 
installed for the comfort and convenience 
of the patrons of the house. An emergency 
hospital, equipped with every facility, is 
one of these features. Shower baths and 
a Green Room have been provided. 



The decorative scheme of the house is 
old ivory, gold and old rose, with silk 

tnpestries, mural paintings and Italian 
marble pillars. 

Mayor Gainor of Providence and vari- 
ous city officials were in attendance at the 
opening. It was expected that Marcus 
Loew would be present, but it was learned 
that he could not reach Providence in time 
for the opening from French Lick Springs, 
where - he is sojourning. N. T. Granlund, 
publicity representative of the Loew Cir- 
cuit, came on from Mew York in his auto- 
mobile to represent the Loew offices at the 
opening ceremonies. 

The bill for the last half of the week 
is composed of the Theodore Trio, Tanean 
Bros., Moran and Wheeler, the Hasdoff 
Troupe and Miss Bingham A Co., In a 
change of repertoire. 

Martin B. Toohey is manager of the 
new theatre. 



BOOSTING IRISH COM .FENS 

Manager Al Darling, of the Colonial 
Theatre, is conducting an advertising cam- 
paign for the appearance of the Irish Col- 
leens at his house next week. He has pro- 
cured special stationery for the occasion 
and is sending out invitations to members 
of Irish societies, Catholic bodies and the 
Knights of Columbua to attend the per- 
formances during the week. . • 

1 DELMORE AND FOX SPLIT 

Utias. Delmore and Mort. Fox bare split 
their vaudeville partnership and are each 
seeking different partners. The act was 
simultaneously booked for. the twenty- 
third Street Theatre and the. American 
Theatre for the last half of last week. A 
disagreement arose among the partners 
and it was decided they would sever their 
partnership. 

NEW TAYLOR GRANVILLE ACT 

Taylor Granville and Laura Pierpont re- 
turn to vaudeville soon after an absence 
of nearly a year, with a new dramatic 
playlet entitled "The Panama Kid." The 
story concerns the theft of the crown 
jewels of the Rajah of India. 



TAYLOR A WARDELL HEAD TAB 

Andy Taylor and Charles Wardell are 
producing a new two-act tabloid musical 
comedy entitled "Hawaiian Topics." The 
show will. carry fifteen persons and special 
scenery. It is headed hy/jf>e producers, 
supported by Charles Patterson, Bernard 
Wills, Harry Berlin, and a chorus of eight. 
The opening date will be in the latter part 
of May.. ' r _ 

LULU BEESON ACT READY 

Lulu Reason, assisted by .Herbert Rice, 
and Amy, "The Fat Woman,", will present 
the comedy skit, "The Road to Pneu- 
monia," for it's initial performance at the- 
Majestic Theatre, Jersey City, next Mon- 
day. The following wees the act will be 
shown at the Fifth Avenue Theatre. 



LEAH NORA HAS NEW ACT 

Leah Nora and company will open with 
a new act on April 16 at Trenton. The 
act has been rewritten and will shortly 
be sene in New York. Leah Nora is Mrs. 
Harry Bailey, wife of the manager of the 
Alhambra Theatre. 



CABARET GETS GENE GREENE 

Gene Greene has signed a ten-week con- 
tract to appear as one of the feature at- 
tractions of the new Palais Royal res- 
taurant, which is due to open April 15. 
Walter Ford, Greene's accompanist, will 
he with him. 



MINSTRELS ARE BOOKED 

Creighton, Belmont and Creighton, "The 
Mudtown Minstrels," have been booked by 
Mark Levy for a twenty-week tour of the 
Pantages Circuit. 



NEW ACT BREAKING IN 

Cu minings and Shelly have received a 
route qn the Interstate time, starting this 
week at Dallas. The act is new and is 
using the mid- Western circuit to break in. 



SUNDAY "GAGS" FORBIDDEN 

A notice was posted in the Keith 
houses last week informing performers 
that they were not to use any "gags" re- 
ferring to Billy Sunday or regarding bis 
evangelistic campaign in New York City. 
A great many performers have been using 
"Sunday" bits in their acts of late. 

FILMS GET HENRY CUVE 

Henry Clive has been engaged as lead- 
ing man for Maxine Elliott in her initial 
Goldwyn screen production. This will be 
Clive's first appearance in motion pictures, 
but prior to going to England ■ two years 
ago he was well known in vaudeville. 

COMPOSER IN VAUDEVILLE 

Los Angeles, Cal., April 9. — Charles 
Wakefield Cadmon, tile composer, appeared 
on the vaudeville stage for one performance 
to play a piano accompaniment for Dorothy 
Jardon, who is singing one of his com- 
positions. ' 

WATSON GIRLS WORKING AGAIN 

The Watson Sisters have taken np their 
route again, after laying off to be home 
with their mother who was undergoing a 
serious operation. The mother is now con- 
valescing. ; 

ANGER WITH ARBUCKLE CO. 

Lou Anger, vaudeville monologist and 
German comedian, has entered the moving 
picture field as studio manager with the 
'Tatty" Arbuckly Film Co. 

JEFFERSON JR WRITES FILMS 

William Jefferson, son of Joseph Jeffer- 
son, has joined the scenario department of 
the "Fatty" Arbuckle Film Co. 



ODONNELL BOOKING ACTS 

Robert J. ODonnell, until last week 
assistant manager of the Orpheum Thea- 
tre, Brooklyn, is now booking acts with 
the United Booking Offices through the 
Ed. S. Keller Office. Ray Hodgdon bad 
this position until last week, when the 
call came to the 71st Regiment, and he 
left for "somewhere in New York." Kath- 
eryne Quinn, also of the Keller staff, will 
marry Mr. Hodgdon upon his return. 



DANCING ACT FALLS THROUGH 

After considerable dickering with the 
booking offices, Margaret Hawkesworth's 
reappearance in vaudeville seems to be 
indefinitely postponed. Miss Hawkes- 
worth, it is said, desired to play only a 
few weeks of Keith time, but the booking 
offices refused to do business with her 
unless she would consent to contract for 
a longer period. 



TRIO GET ROUTE 

Smith, Namoli and Lang, a siuging trio, 
have been provided with a U. B. O. route 
by Jack Henry and will open their tour in 
Toledo, Ohio, next Monday. 



S. L. HARRIS WITH THE CUPPER 

S. L. Harris, formerly with a theatrical 
trade paper, is now connected with the 
vaudeville department of The Clipper. 



STETSON AND HUBER RETURN 

Stetson and Huber have returned East, 
after a tonr of Western time. 




NO MORE SERIALS FOR KEITH 

The moving picture serial, "Patria," will 
conclude its run in the Keith vaudeville 
bouses with the week of April 29. It will 
not be followed by another serial picture, 
according to J. J, Maloney, manager of 
the New York Keith theatres. Although 
Maloney declares that the serial was a suc- 
cess, it is a fact that a great majority of 
the audience walked out on it In all Keith 
theatres, with the possible exceptions of 
the Royal and Alhambra. One more act 
will be added to the Keith bills in the place 
of the serial. 



Fin AT ATLANTIC CITY CAFE 

Atlantic City, N. J., April 7. — Mile 
Fifi, the dancer, who in private life is 
Baroness De Cbarny, has been engaged as 
a feature of the cabaret show at the Cafe 
Martin during the Easter holidays. It is 
likely she will remain all summer and 
cancel her present route over the Orpheum. 

BECKER GETS U. B. O. TIME 

Herman Becker's act, "Check Your Bag- 
gage," has completed a tour of the West- 
ern Vaudeville Managers' Circuit and will 
commence a tour of the' United Family 
time houses. Their Initial appearance will 
be at Proctor's Twenty-third Street Tbea-, 
tre next Monday. 



SOLDIER BOYS HELP DARLING 

One of the most clever vaudeville pub- 
licity stunts ever nulled off in New York 
has been successfully carried out by Man- 
ager Al Darling, of the Colonial Theatre. 
In connection with "America First," which 
is now playing at the Colonial, Darling 
has secured the services of several of the 
boys of the Twelfth Regiment, who march 
up and down in front of the theatre, as 
if on sentinel duty. The lobby has an at- 
tractive-display of American flags. 

MCKAY'S REVUE CANCELS 

Buffalo, N. Y., April 7.— Baby Edith 
McKay, daughter of Mrs. and Mr. TOm 
McKay, of McKay's Scotch Revue, is 
seriously ill with pneumonia In the Chil- 
dren's hospital here, and the act has can- 
celed all present bookings to be with the 
child. 



RUTH THOMAS PLANS TOUR 

Ituth Thomas has arranged an extended 
tonr, which will cover all the principal 
summer resorts of the United States and 
Canada, with an orchestra of thirty pieces 
accompanying her. 

CLARK PREPARING VAUDE. ACT 

Wallis Clark is preparing a new act 
for vaudeville, entitled "After Fifty 
Years," by- T. W. Gibson. August in 
Glaasmire will direct the tour and M. S. 
Bentham will do the. booking. 



SHARIFF HAS MUSICAL REVIEW 

Abalam Shariff, Arabian manager, who 
has played all the best vaudeville bouses 
in this country and Europe with his fa- 
mous whirlwind Arabians, has added a 
bevy of pretty girls to his troupe, and. is 
playing some of the smaller time getting 
his attraction ready for the big time. 

LOEW VAUDEVILLE AT AUGUSTA 

Augusta. Ga., April 5.— The New Mod- 
i jeska,' Theatre has discontinued - its policy 
of Selmiek and Artcraft Photoplays, and 
commencing April 12 will form a link in 
the chain of Southern theatres offering 
Loew*s vaudeville. Frank J. Miller is the 
manager. 



"OH YOU DEVIL" STARTS 

"Oh, Yon Devil," the vaudeville act pro- 
duced by Ned Dandy for Herman Becker, 
commenced a tour of the Loew Circuit 
last Monday at the Majestic Theatre. Erie, 
Pa. There is a cast of ten people headed 
by Clay Crouch, black face comedian. 



DOLL GIRL REPLACED 

The Moscrop Girls have replaced The 
Doll Girls in the act with George Felix. 
The act has received a three-year rout* 
from the U. B. O., and will commence 
their tour in Philadelphia April 23. Jack 
Henry is handling the act. 



STUART SAGE TO ENTER VAUDE. 

At the completion of his engagement in 
"Old Lady 31," Stuart 8cge will enter 
vaudeville. He has bought a playlet called 
"The Song of Youth," from the pen of Clif- 
ford Maple. It will see vaudeville some- 
time in June. 



RING AND MACK IN MACK SKETCH 

Willard Mack has written a new play- 
let, entitled "Back Fires," in which his 
brother, William, and Frances Ring are 
appearing. 

BILLY MORTON BOOKED SOLID 

Pawtucket, R. L, April 7. — Billy Mor- 
ton, the crazy magician, is booked solid 
until June through New England. 



GRACE ELLSWORTH 

Singing Comedienne 



VIOLET BARNEY Df NEW ACT 

Violet Barney has been engaged by 
Edgar Allen for a new vaudeville act 
opening April Id. 



THE NEW YORK C L I P.P ER 



April ll r 1917 




PALACE 

A two-man Chinese' act called "The 
D'Avigneau's Chinese Dno" opened the 
show with what seemed a long act for this 
spot. One of them, sings a quavering bari- 
tone and the other plays the piano. The 
act proved entertaining to a certain degree 
and then disappointed. "Butterfly" was 
ragged and one number, sung in Italian, 
went over well. 

Mary Melville, assisted by George Rule, 
went into a cross fire song and dance 
routine, bnt did not accomplish much. The 
act is fully reviewed under New Acts. 

Sarah Padden heads a cunipany of five 
in as fine a dramatic treat, in the way of 
a. playlet, entitled "The Clod," as has ever 
been viewed. The story is a war story 
and, therefore, proved more interesting 
than usual. The picturizationof the poor, 
overworked farm woman who is abused by 
soldiers searching her premises, and her 
final declaration of her rights was splen- 
didly bandied by Miss Padden, who needs 
no spot light to bring forth her dramatic 
talents. This act, while hardly new, can 
be classed as one of the dramatic hits of 
the season and the revelation of a talented 
actress. 

Willie Weston was on fourth and did 
jnst a trifle too much. Weston is using 
most of his old talk, with a new song 
here and there and a Hebrew version of 
"The Face on the Bar Boom Floor." A 
Chinese number flopped and a rag version 
of "Dan McGrew" went over big. Weston 
did just five minutes too long. 

White and Cavanangh return with prac- 
tically the same routine they have been 
using heretofore, excepting a closing num- 
ber. The drop in the act is beginning to 
"show wear. After the regular routine of 
dance numbers, including the "Request 
Dances," the team offered what they 
termed "The. Chemise Chiwabble," a West- 
ern dance which' is an offspring of "Ball- 
ing. thV Jack" and "Walking the Dog." 
The act scored. ■ 

' After intermission, Elizabeth Murray, 
assisted by Jack Stern, offered a dandy 
'song routine, of which the opening num- 
ber, "Maryland," is particularly good. 
Miss Murray looked splendid in a new 
creation ■ of black and white silk, while 
Stern seemed both awkward in walking 
across the stage and taking bows. He evi- 
dently was frightened over appearing at 
the Palace. 

■ 'Al Herman followed with an abundance 
of self assurance. Some of Herman's com- 
edy needs fumigating, while the remainder 
is so old that it totters. 

Soft spots and billing mean nothing 
when an artist must resort to Van Hoven's 
stuff to get over and then bungle things 
worse by stepping into the gutter with n 
few gags. 

Gertrude Hoffmann and her troupe of 
dancers and singers followed, closing the 
vaudeville portion of the show. Miss Hoff- 
mann attempts much, but accomplishes lit- 
tle. In the Spring song, the girls forgot 
they sang and spoiled the number on ac- 
count of not working in unison. This 
number is a disrobing number, in which 
everything outside of the music was badly 
handled. The impression of Ruth St. 
Denis failed, because no one knew what 
was going on. "The Song of the Nations" 
did not get over because the girls forgot 
the song or neglected to sing. In the 
Montmartre number, the Apache dance 
scored because it was a trifle different. 
The "Can-Can" dancers were impossible, 
the Hawaiian dance was foolish even to 
attempt, and the chorus seemed lost. 

Miss Hoffmann's specialty as a drummer 
was well appreciated, and the tank num- 
ber was a great big comedy carnival to 
those appearing in it as the audience was 
already on its way ont 

"Patria" was the closer, . showing -the 
thirteenth episode, and entertained those 
who watched it as it has heretofore. 

S. L. H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued en page S) 



COLONIAL 

The Colonial has a standard bill this 
week, but "America First" sets a hot pace 
early that the rest of the acts find well 
nigh impossible to follow, for, just at the 
present time "America First" is in a class 
by itself for getting applause and en- 
thusiasm. 

Perhaps it would be best to move this 
act down so that it would end the first 
half of the show, because, as matters 
stand, it is the hardest kind of a task to 
follow this big flash and win the audience. 

Rolfe and Maddock, in producing "Amer- 
ica First," certainly had their ear to the 
ground and gave the public what it most 
desired. The act will prove as able an 
argument for recruiting men to the colors 
as will any speech or advertisement. It 
is an inspiring spectacle, put on in a way 
that spells the last word in showmanship. 

There is only one criticism of the act to 
make: The soloists, at times, become too 
ambitious and endeavor to end their songs 
higher than that for which their voices 
are suited. 

The bill was opened by the Two Carl- 
tons, who live up to their title of 
"Phlegmatic Gymnasts." Their feats are 
made entertaining only by the extreme 
nonchalance of the duo. 

Ed Weber and Joe Rome, in a comedy 
dancing act, fell down miserably at Mon- 
day's matinee. There is nothing in their 
work that stands out except, possibly, the 
little stepping they do without a musical 
accompaniment. 

"America First" was followed by Harry 
and Emma Sharrock. who proceeded to 
relieve the patriotic intensity which the 
former act had occasioned. The setting 
up of the fortune telling tent and the 
ballyhooing of the man went over big. 
The mind-reading part of the turn was 
done with remarkable skill and just 
enough comedy was interpolated into it 
to keep it from becoming monotonous. 

To Clark and Hamilton were given the 
headline honors, although, their success 
was equalled by other acts . on the bill. 
Their turn is very clever, and the man has 
an inimitable style of comedy: His talks 
with the waiter are very ludicrous,' while 
his flirtation with the girl is equally fanny. 
He stalls a bit too much at the piano. In 
the last number, which is a Japanese se- 
lection, he is- made up as a Chinaman. 
This is inexcusable. 

The girl in the act has charm and abil- 
ity. There is far too little of her in the 
turn. The man does too much work in 
the act, while she does not do enough. If 
she were to do more the man's work would 
be appreciated by contrast. This reviewer 
felt that he would have liked to have seen 
the girl dance another number ami also, 
po"ssiEly. sing another 'song. 
. The Four . Entertainers followed -inter- 
mission'. Their voices harmonize well; and 
they render a number of songs in a pleas- 
ing way. The audience liked their. work, 
and the quartette closed to a gratifying 
band. 

Paul Dickey and Company, in a new 
playlet, entitled "The Lincoln Highway- 
man," unfolded a plot which received the 
audience's undivided attention. The offer- 
ing will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Johnnie Dyer and Frank Fay, in 
"Whafs It All About?" have a new woman 
in their turn. For some inexplicable rea- 
son her name does not appear on the pro- 
gram although she does considerable' work 
in' the act. However, she does not meas- 
ure up to her predecessor. , " 
I Dyer and Fay, with the. assistance of 
the" woman, went over big, as' 'they always 
do. Almost the entire credit should go to 
Fay, whose nut stuff always scores 
heavily. . 

The performance was closed with the 
thirteenth episode of "Patria." H. G. 



ALHAMBRA 

Rock and White are the headliners here 
this week. They score a gratifying suc- 
cess but overdo their number of encores, 
giving far too many on Monday night. 

Frances White sang a new kid's song 
about wanting to be a monkey in the zoo, 
much on the style of her famous spelling 
song and "six-times-six" number. Later 
in the act she sang these other two num- 
bers, and the similarity in her rendition 
of the three selections was very notice- 
able. The voice, the steps and the man- 
nerisms were almost identical in all of the 
songs. 

Toward the end of the act the audience 
did not seem to want much of Rock, re- 
questing selections instead from his part- 
ner. More or less humorously Rock in- 
quired of the audience if they knew that 
he was in the act. 

The act on Monday night was not up to 
Rock and White standard. There was not 
sufficient color in it, it being entirely too 
much of the same kind of material. The 
Chinese number or the sailor number 
would have greatly helped the turn. 

The show was opened by the Brightons, 
who make as attractive and artistic pic- 
tures from a bunch of rags as can the 
average painter with his brush. The turn 
should have been accorded a warmer 
hand, bnt the Alhambra audience re- 
mained more or less frozen until about the 
fourth spot. 

J. Warren Keane and . Grace White, 
billed as the trickologist and the pianist, 
found it rather chilly in the second spot 
Miss White's piano playing received fair 
appreciation. Keane's tricks are, on the 
whole, ordinary. - His handkerchief-knot 
trick is original and clever. As there was 
no- necessity for an encore, Keane, after 
bowing off, found it necessary to apolo- 
gize when he reappeared in one and ex- 
plained to the audience that he would 
entertain them while the stage hands set 
the scene for the next act. 

Bonnie Gaylord and Iva Lancton wil' 
receive a review. under New Acts. 

Al Gerard and' Sylvia Clark found it 
easy going. Miss Clark "got" the audi- 
ence immediately with her "nut" style .of 
comedy.' Her song about "why speak, -of 
love?' was put over in great shape. Ger- 
ard's singing voice is his forte, and he 
rendered several numbers very pleasingly. 
The pair are capable dancers. 

The first half of the bill was closed \>j 
Jack Wyatt and his Scotch Lads and 
Lassies. In their kilts and tartans, they 
sounded the pipes, tapped the drums, 
danced and sang in truly Highland style. 
Wyatt possesses a rich, natural voice, and 
is featured in several tuneful Scotch melo- 
dies. The man who plays the tig drum 
deserves a special word of praise for the 
deft manner in which he wields the sticks. 
All of the lads and lassies are good danc- 
ers and possess unusually good chorus 
voices. The act was well received. 

Ben Bernie and Phil Baker .with their 
accordeon and violin, were a young riot 
after intermission. These two fellows put 
tons of "pep", into their work and com- 
bine good music with good showmanship, 
with the natural result that they get oyer 
with unquestioned success. Their asking 
the audience to request numbers for them 
to play adds to their popularity. 

Henry B. Toomer and Company occu- 
pied the next spot in Aaron Hoffman's 
playlet, "The Headliners," This offering 
cleaned up, as is its usual habit. The 
story of the vaudeville team of Dunn and 
Gawn reaching New York and breaking 
into vaudeville, pleased the Albambraites, 
who were very generous with their ap- 
plause. The playlet was well acted and 
well presented. • • 

"Patria" closed the show and held a 
good proportion of the audience. H. O. 



RIVERSIDE 



A crowded house enthusiastically ap- 
plauded the timely war pictures of the 
Hearst-Pathe News Pictorial on Monday 
afternoon, after which Apdale's Zoological 
Circus, an animal act, consisting of bears, 
dogs, monkeys, and an ant eater furnished 
a clever bit of entertainment. The ani- 
mals are well trained and went through 
their tricks aa though they enjoyed them 
fully as keenly as the audience. A small 
fox terrier that acted as ringmaster dur- 
ing the entire act is particularly intelligent 

Regal and Bender, two yonng men, sing 
a song fairly well, tell a few jokes and 
the break into a good routine of acrobatics. 
They work in street dress and do two or 
three stunts which are very difficult 

Hubert Kinney and Rhea Lusby present 
a series of dance fantasies, which are a 
pleasure to witness. It is safe to say that 
after the present dance craze is entirely 
forgotten this pair will have no difficulty 
in holding down a good spot on any vaude- 
ville bill. The tennis dance which closes 
their act is a well thought ont and excel- 
lently executed idea. 

Ah Herman, the black face comedian, 
told a number of new stories and some old 
ones as well, and, as the ancient ones 
provoked as mnch langhter as the newer 
ones, there seems little need for him to 
search for new material The "Rolling 
Chair" song just suits him, and if he had 
a sufficient supply of extra verses could 
have prolonged his act almost indefinitely. 

"The Four Husbands," the miniature 
musical comedy which scored, a hit at the 
Palace last week, greatly pleased the up- 
town audience. Florence Bain and Ray 
Raymond gave their usual clever perform- 
ance, and George W. Jinks, the comedian, 
was amusing as ever. The fine cast of 
principals and the big singing chorus, to- 
gether with the excellent musical numbers, 
make this one of the best acts of its kind 
in vaudeville. 

The Watson Sisters, opening intermis- 
sion, scored a solid hit and were..tbe laugh- 
ing hit. of the bill These, clever girls are 
brim full of ability. They know ' how to 
select their material and, once having 
made their selection, know how to put it 
over. The line "For no reason we.d^nce," 
could well be eliminated. These girls are 
far too clever to bother' with a phrase 
which almost every small tuner in the 
country has made a part of his act. 

Searl Allen and Ed Howard have in 
"A. Real Pal" a clever rustic playlet with 
some good lines and one. or two amus- 
ing' situations. Following; the Watson sis- 
ters, the act moved slowly, at first but 
brightened up well toward the finish. An 
earlier spot on the bill would undoubtedly 
better suit the act. 

Nan Halperin, next to closing, invest- 
ed each one of her character songs with 
rare charm. Whether it be the dissatis- 
fied child, the "youngest in the family," the 
blase- "divorcee." or ike little bride who 
wants her wedding march played in rag- 
time, this talented artist is a delight She 
is continually improving in her work, her 
voice in particular showing marked evi- 
dences of culture. 

The thirteenth episode of "Patria" closed 
the bill. W. V. 



JERSEY CO. INCORPORATED 

Teentoit, N. J., April 7. — The Robinson 
& Burns Amuse. Co., of Jersey City, has 
been granted a charter to conduct amuse- 
ment enterprises. The concern is capital- 
ized at $125,000, and the incorporators are 
Henry de Groot Edward Harold Burns 
and Marion Heycock. 



HIPPODROME CELEBRATING 
This week is celebration week at the 
Hippodrome, to-morrow being the twelfth 
anniversary of the big playhouse. Charles 
Dillingham will have a monster street 
parade; which will also include merchants 
from the "Brighter Sixth Avenue" move- 
ment 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



v^c-r 




EFFIE SHANNON & CO. 

Theatre— Palace, Staten Island. 

Style— Comedy playlet. 

Time— Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

"Champagne," a comedy of bubbles by 
Edwin Burke, is the vehicle that Effie 
Shannon, Broadway star and late of the 
team of "Kelcy and Shannon," has 
chosen for her fling at "vode." 

The playlet is a good one. The scene 
is an alcove on the balcony of a New 
York restaurant. The curtain rises 
with the waiter (William Friend) tell- 
ing a "tango lizard" (Arthur Albertson) 
about the gentleman who has the table 
reserved. The boy informs the waiter 
that be is tired of the "fast life," and 
■wants to get away from it. The gen- 
tlemen in question enters and the boy, 
acting on a hint, exits. The gentleman 
(Regan Hughston) tells the waiter he is 
in search of a thrill and the waiter gives 
him a line of talk. 

While they are conversing, the woman 
(Miss Shannon) appears, arguing with 
the tango boy over her right to be in the 
.place alone. Seeing the gentleman she 
immediately calls him "hubby" and sits 
down at the table opposite him. He 
carries on the deception until the boy 
and waiter are gone and then she apolo- 
gizes- and tells him she 'is looking for a 
thrill also. 

A number of further complications 
then arise in which the boy and the 
waiter "frame up" the gentleman, hav- 
ing learned that he is a prominent busi- 
ness man. They pull off the "wife out- 
side and flash light photo" stunt, and 
almost get away with it. At this point 
no one can tell whether the woman is in 
on the deal or not, as she tells the gen- 
tleman to pay the waiter $100 to slip 
them out the rear way. 

Then the tables turn, the gentleman 
gently informing the tango boy and the 
waiter that they are really man and wife, 
and had bluffed the whole thing to see 
how it really was to live the gay, fast 
life. Thereupon, the waiter returns the 
woman's purse which he had "accident- 
ally" removed. The tango boys wish is 
thereby fulfilled, in finding a "straight 
coupie" in the joint and he and the 
waiter decide to reform. 

Tue playlet is a novel one, although 
the ending is a bit unconvincing, as most 

I of the persons in the audience seemed 
to think. Miss Shannon is excellent, as 
is her supporting cast. The setting is a 
fine one. The act should go over well in 
any big time theatre or where an audi- 
ence wishes to get a look at life in a 
. lobster palace. H. S. P. 



DORE'S BEAUS AND BELLES 

Theatre — Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — Full stage, special. 

A singing quartette, a dancer, pianist 
and violinist constitute this new offer- 
ing of Mme. Dore. The idea of the act 
is very unique, it being assembled as a 
parlor entertainment in a Southern 
home, the people dressed in costumes of 
the antebellum period. 

The' opening is the rendition of old- 
time Southern songs by the quartette, 
two men and two women, accompanied 
by the musicians. Then each of the 
members' does a single number and the 
.dancer renders well a novel "toe dance." 
It would ' be thought that, with an 
offering of this type, exclusive material 
would 1)8 sought, but mostly all of the 
numbers are Of the popular variety 
generally utilized by all acts. 

Mme. Dore has a pleasing offering in 
this act, and if she would take the pains 
might construct a turn with the use of 
exclusive and original material which 
would be greatly sought. As the act 
is at, .present, it. ia hardly of sufficient 
value to be used as a feature offering 
jo the. neighborhood theatres. A. U. 




MORGAN & ARMSTRONG 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifty-eighth Street. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting — Special 

This act ia done in one, the back 
drop representing the seashore. 

The man is one of those fellows who 
guesses your correct weight or gives you 
your money back. An eccentrically- 
dressed comedienne, who is as thin as 
a rail, refuses to get weighed. She 
exits, after telling the man she has 
fallen in love with him. She promises 
to return soon. Left alone, the man 
sings a popular number and sings it 
well. The woman sings about a dog 
butcher's daughter. The song is meant 
to be funny, but sadly misses its mark. 
This is followed by a duet in which 
the pair harmonize exceptionally well. 
There is then some more patter, fol- 
lowed by a couple of ukelele numbers 
which conclude the turn. 

The singing in the act is excellent. 
The comedy '""is deplorable. Why a 
woman, who is not naturally funny, 
dolls herself in an outlandish rig in an 
attempt to be comic, is inexplicable. 

This turn needs revising. It should 
be remodeled into a neat man and girl 
act, both playing straight, with plenty 
of song, because this pair possess sing- 
ing voices far above the average. 

H. G. 



GAYLORD & LANCTON 

Theatre — Alhambra. 

Style— Skit. 

Time — Ticelve minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

Bonnie Gaylord and Iva Lancton start 
their skit in one. As two colored girls 
they sing a number and then indulge in 
a little comic talk followed by a dance, 
which doesn't seem to go smoothly, 
purposely. This leads to a fight, and 
the pair walk off disgustedly to finish 
their "scrap" in the dressing room. 

The drop rises upon a dressing room 
scene, and the pair enter still fighting. 
They abuse each other with words, 
while they rid their faces of the burnt 
cork and don their street attire. 

Finally, the storm of anger abates 
when they receive an offer to play at 
a club entertainment, and one of the 
girls pleads with the other to "make 
up" because she needs the money which 
they will get at the entertainment to 
buy her mother a birthday present. 
The pair exit with a song and dance. 
The turn is novel and gives the audi- 
ence enough "inside stuff" to make it 
more than acceptable. The girls are 
both talented, and the only thing needed 
in the act is some wittier dialogue. 

H. G. 



PAUL DICKEY & CO. 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time— Thirty minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

The name of this playlet ia "The 
Lincoln Highwayman." 

It is one of 'the most gripping and in- 
teresting playlets that has ever graced 
the vaudeville boards. Besides possess- 
ing these qualities, it is perfectly staged 
and admirably acted. 

The scene is the interior of a garage, 
somewhere on the Lincoln Highway, 
near the State line between California 
and Nevada. 

A big reward has been offered for the 
capture of a noted highwayman, and 
the audience is led to believe that he is 
Jimmy Rucker (Paul Dickey). When 
he seems to be finally bearded in his 
den, he turns upon his pursuers, masters 
them and arrests them, for, it now de- 
velops, Rucker is a secret service man 
and . his "pursuers" are the highway- 
men that are wanted. A love plot runs 

,. through the playlet, in which Rucker 
and Kitty Clover, a reporter, are con- 
cerned. Of course, all ends as happily 
as it should in all well- written playlets. 
Inez Plummer is exceptionally good in 
the role of Kitty, while Paul Dickey, 
who, by the way, is the author of the 
playlet, leaves nothing to be desired in 
his characterization. H. G. 



"THE DREAM GARDEN" 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 

Style— Musical instruments. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — ' Special. 

In a so-called "dream garden" six 
pretty girls, dressed in old-fashioned 
hoop skirts and quaint head-gear, enter- 
tain upon various brass musical instru- 
ments and violins. Their selections num- 
ber about six in all, and are well played. 
The scene in back lights up and give 
a pretty effect. 

In the final number the girls' hats also 
light up. This is quite novel. 

The act is an excellent one of its style 
and should find it easy work succeeding. 
Some of the numbers — the bass horn 
solo, for instance — are a trifle long and 
would be more acceptable if made 
shorter. H. G. 



NAINOA 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 

Style — Steel guitar. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Nainoa is an Hawaiian and plays the 
steel guitar in a way that pleases the 
audience. After playing an ' opening 
waltz number, he explains to the audi- 
ence that it is a guitar that he is play- 
ing, explaining in a manner that im- 
plies that the audience might doubt it- 
There is absolutely no reason or neces- 
sity for the explanation. If it is given 
merely because Nainoa wants the audi- 
ence to hear bis Hawaiian accent, he 
should, instead, tell a Joke about Hawaii 
or say something that will make the 
audience laugh. 

Following the waltz number be plays 
an Hawaiian medley. He next plays 
"When You and I Were Young, Mag- 
gie." This is followed by a rag number. 
A very clever military selection and an- 
other popular number complete the turn. 
He should pay more attention to his 
makeup. His face was entirely too 'col- 
orless on Thursday afternoon. 

H. G. 



BRENDA FOWLER & CO. 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 
Style — Dramatic Sketch. 
Tim* — Nineteen minutes. 

Setting— Full stage, special. 

"Petticoat Politics," a sketch based 
on the difference of belief existing be- 
tween mother and daughter with refer- 
ence to the suffragette question, was 
written by Miss Fowler, The story ia 
that of a mother who is head of an 
"anti" organization and a daughter, a 
lawyer, who ' fosters votes fiw women. 
They nave established than- headquar- 
ters in the library of trfeir home, an 
equal division of space in the room be- 
ing used by each, in which they have a 
large display of banners and emblems 
of the rival organizations. Much good 
comedy business is done between the 
two women through the use of "pla- 
cards" of their different political faiths. 

A bit of romance is injected into the 
story when the daughter and her sweet- 
heart narrate how they attended the 
suffragette convention in Chicago, travel- 
ing on the same train. The mother then 
tells the daughter that she has heard 
of a scandal in the latter organization 
in which one of the prominent women 
ia involved. 

With this explanation there enters a 
"detective." He tells the daughter that 
he wants to talk with her regarding a 
scandal in which her sweetheart is in- 
volved, and informs her that unless aha 
will pay a certain amount to him he 
will expose both parties involved. This 
aha refuses to do. 

He then states that both she and the 
young man had gone to Chicago on the 
same train, and that the man had 
bought the tickets, which constituted a 
violation of the "Mann" law. The 
sweetheart then arrives on the scene 
and starts to go after the "blackmailer," 
after which the girl states that she and 
the man are married and had been for 
two weeks. This, of course, eliminates 
the blackmailer. 

When the turn is "ribbed" into proper 
shape and the players are a bit more 
familiar with their parts and business, 
amateurishness which seems to prevail 
at present can be worn away. A. U. 



SARINOFF 

Theatre— Palace, Staten Island. 
Type — Vovelty dance act. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — Ballroom. 

Sarinoff, the noted violinist and lately 
with Joseph San tley, presents a novel 
musical and dancing' act, assisted by the 
Misses Janet Bruce and Marion Stan- 
ford. 

The act opens with one of the girls, 
stunningly gowned, at the piano. The 
other enters and sings a pretty ballad 
during which the soft strains of a vio- 
lin are heard, and Sarinoff enters, when 
the girl sings to him as he plays. After 
this number the girls exit and he renders 
a selection. The next is a piano solo by 
the yonng lady. 

The act closes with a Spanish dance 
by the singer, accompanied by Sarinoff 
and the other young lady. Both girls are 
talented, and, with the young violinist, 
they have a dandy act that should be 
a "go" wherever presented. H. S. P. 



HARRIET MARLOTTE & CO 

Theatre — Riviera. 

Style — Playlet. 

Time — Nineteen minutes. 

Setting— House. 

In the -first place this act should have 
a special setting. The scene is supposed 
to represent the interior of a second-hand 
ladies' clothing store, but, save for a 
counter and an attempt at a show win- 
dow effect in the back, the scene might 
represent anything from a front parlor 
to an attic storeroom. The poor setting 
detracts greatly from the act. 

The playlet can hardly stand for such 
a drawback at its very beginning because 
it possesses a poor plot that would never 
stand close analyzing. It is acted even 
more poorly. The saleslady (Harriet 
Marlotte) gives a passable performance, 
but her support go through their lines 
as if they were giving a poor performance 
at an amateur dramatic club entertain- 
ment. 

The playlet deals with a young girl 
who decides to sell her bridal gown be- 
cause her lover has turned, her down. 
When the dress is pnt in the store win- 
dow, it is recognized by ber lover who 
comes in to purchase it. He meets the 
love-smitten girl, everything ia adjusted 
as it should be, and matters are arranged 
so that she can wear her bridal dress 
after all. Another love plot runs through 
the piece in which the saleslady is con- 
cerned, and furnishes whatever comedy 
ia in the playlet 

The turn lacks all the qualities neces- 
sary for vaudeville success. H. G. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



A WONDERFUL TRIBUTE FROM ELIZABETH MURRAY 

An artist whose past performances surely stamp her as a most capable judge of a good song when she hears it. 



HOTEL. WOODWARD, New York 

Mr, Julius Witmark. 

My dear Mr. Witmark;— Just a line to let you know that WALTER DONALDSON'S 



I'VE GOT THE SWEETEST GIRL 



f 



ITSJ MARYLAND 



is a wonderful song for me and one of the best bits 1 have ever had. With all good wishes, most sincerely, 

April seventh, 1917 ELIZABETH M. MURRAY. 

MISS MURRAY is this week playing at KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE, NEW YORK, and from the way the song 
U going, it is quite evident that her audiences- like it just as well as she does. Doublo versions of all kinds. 

Professional copies and orchestrations in 6 keys— E6, (B6 to c). F, (c to d). G, (d to e). A», ( Efe to F). A, (e to f£). Bb, (f tog). 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Chicago m. Witmark & Sons Philadelphia 



BOSTON 



Pantages Building Schiller Building MoWf\ Prof. Rooms. AL. COOK. Mgr. 1021 Chestnut St. SlfJ Trenion, St. 

AL. BROWNE. Mgr. TOM QUIGLEY. Mgr. 1562 broadway. next to palace theatre ED. EDWARDS. Mgr. JACK LAHEY. Mgr. 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 



General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Time* Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

General Booking Manager 



Mr. Srhenrh Personally latenrlews Artist* Daily Between 11 end 1 



Chicago Ofice: North Ansriun Building 
FRANK Q. DOYLE. fa. charge 



Boeton Office: Tmnont Theatre Building 
FRED MARDO, fa charge 



Act* laying off in Southern territory wire this office. 



B.F. Keith's Circuit of Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH. PrssMsnt. g. P. ALBS*. V k e Pre*. * Oan. Mar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAM BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K, HODG DOW, 
Booking Manager of die UNITED 

OFFICES 

F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

MEW YORK CITY 



Read the Words 

FIRST VERSE 
Wake, America I call the mutter roll! 
All true men are with you heart and soul: 
Wave old Glory I let the eagle scream; 
Truth and right and justice are supreme. 
Here your boys come fifteen million strong. 
Farm and hamlet swell the mighty throng. 
Each man ready, firm and steady: 
Hear their voices blend in martial song. 

REFRAIN 
We're coming, America, to see you through, 
You've only to set the task for us to do, 
We're trusty Americans all tried and true. 
"Our country forever" is our cry. 
If you want us to man the forts or sail the 

seas, 
We're soldiers or mariners, whiche'er you 

please. 
Whatever you would make us, here we are 

if you will take ut. 
And with you well do or die. 

TRIO 
See from the North the myriads cornel 
Hark from the South the roll of the drum! 
Brothers united, patriots plighted 
Every man a soldier brave. 
East sends her thousands, heroes all. 
West does not falter at honor's call, 
Shoulder to shoulder, who could be bolder? 
Victory or glory's grave. 



"America." 



FINALE 



Cotvrixhttd by E. T. Fault 



AMERICA FOREVER 

By E. T. PAULL, the New March King 
ABSOLUTELY THE GREATEST MARTIAL PATRIOTIC SONG EVER WRITTEN 

Contains 2 Verses With Refrain, Trio and Finale. A Wonderful Song. Nothing Else Like It. Inspiring 
and Thrilling Words bj H. A. FREEMAN. Irresistible and Catchy Melody by F_ T. PAULL. A Masterpiece. 
Easy to Loam. Easy to Sing. Suits Any Voice. The One Great Song of the Hour. In a Class by luelf. 
For HEADUNERS, a record breaker song. For STARS, a magnificent song that will sweep the country. Try it- 

" AMERICA FOREVER" will positively strengthen and add class to any- act. Single or double torn. Sketch 
or special act. 

"AMERICA FOREVER',' as a chorus or ensemble number, will make a tremendous ovation. A sensational 
novelty. 

" AMERICA FOREVER" is a song for all singers, in all places, at all times, and will ring from one end of the 
Country to the other. 

"AMERICA FOREVER" will appeal to all classes, dignified, non-sectional, exclusive. . Just what the public 
want and are waiting for. ...... 

Now is the Time. Now is the How. Don't Pat Off. Don't Delay. Be the First in the Field. 

If you ever needed a song in your life, entirely out of the ordinary, you need AMERICA FOREVER. 

If you ever made good with anything, yon can make a terrific hit with AMERICA FOREVER. 

A copy of this great song will be sent to recognized professional singers only by addressing the publishers, 

E. T. PAULL MUSIC CO., 243 W. 42d St, New York 



.■.?.-_ ,-. 



._' 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




DANIELS GETS 

"UNBORN CHILD" 

FOR STOCK 

W ILL PLAY 50-60 WITH OWNERS 



The Charles W. Daniels Stock Co., at 
the Grand Opera House, Brooklyn, has 
been taken over by Gazzolo, Gatts and 
Clifford, owners of "Her Unborn Child," 
for a period of three or f oar weeks begin- 
ning April 16, during which time the stock 
company will present the play on a per- 
centage basis. The engagement may be 
for a longer time if the ran is found profit- 
able. 

"Her Unborn Child" baa proved a win- 
ner for Gazzolo, Gatts and Clifford, and 
four companies have been playing to big 
business. The company playing on the In- 
ternational Circuit has had runs of several 
weeks in Philadelphia, Boston and New 
York. 

This will be the first presentation of the 
play in stock, although it has not been re- - 
leased for general use in that field. 

The regular Daniels Company will ap- 
pear in the production. 

CAIRNS BROS. HAVE NEW SHOW 

Decatur, 111., April 17.— "The Call of 
the Woods," a four-act drama, will be the 
production presented by the seven Cairns 
brothers this season. Rehearsals for the 
play will begin at Blue Mound on April 
12, and die first production will be given 
there on Saturday, April 21. 

There will be twenty-five people in the 
show this season, and the equipment will 
be carried in two cars. An entirely new 
set of equipment and scenery has been pur- 
chased. The Cairns brothers have a can- 
vas theatre that will seat 1,500 people. 
Louis A. Elliott is advance man for the 
show. The Cairns boys will have a strong 
ball team again this summer, and will play 
in most of the towns they will visit. ' 



ANGELL'S COMEDIANS CLOSE 
Hayti. Mo.. April 7. — Angell's Come- 
dians, under the management of Billie O. 
Angelo have closed a season of forty-five 
weeks here last Saturday, and the various 
members have gone to their respective 
homes for a four-week vacation prior to 
the opening of the Summer tent season at 
Leon, la., the first week of May. Mr. 
Angelo went to Wichita, Kan. : Miss Del- 
zeli, to St. Louis ; Joseph Lehmann. to 
Kansas City ; Miss Hebert, to Dallas ; Mr. 
Swadley. to St Louis; Chief Meredith, to 
Tulsa, Okla. ; Mrs. Swadley, to Ottumwa, 
la. ; Mr. Schmer, to Omaha, and The 
Langueins, to Omaha. 



FIELDS CO. IN 7TH WEEK 

White Flairs, N. Y., April 9. — The 
Marguerite Fields Stock Co., under the 
management of K. T. Marvin, is now on 
its seventh week at the Palace Theatre. 
This week "A Mile a Minute Kendall" is 
being given. The roster of the company 
is as follows: Marguerite Field, leading 
woman ; Rose Tiffany, second woman ; 
Alma Blake, characters; Mae Tipton, in- 
genues ; Ralph Campbell, leading man : 
Earl McClellan, director: Allen Lee, sec- 
ond business; Thorald March, light com- 
edy; Leslie Bassett, characters; Lewis 
Herron, general business ; Harold Clafflin, . 
stage manager; Arthur Ludham, assistant 
manager, and Edwin Vandennark, artist. 



BOXY ALLEN CO. BANQUETED 

Cumberland, Md., April 7. — Billy Al- 
len and his Musical Comedy Co., playing 
here last week were tendered a banquet on 
the stage of the Maryland Theatre. Among 
the guests were Billy Allen, Mrs. Billy Al- 
len, Hal L. Kiter, Mrs. Hal Kiter, Lew 
Petel, Lew Naden, Cliff Hyde, Austin 
Geotz, B. B. Steel, Ed. Oneil, Sam Bratchi, 
Harry Clark, Wm. Gahagan, Marie Law- 
rence, Edithie Carlisle, Sydney Hamilton, 
Fay Duffy, Tommy Woodhall, Vemia 
Elliott, Ruth Petit, Josie Steel, Alice 
Feldman, Edna. Troutman, Bobby Evans, 
Sin Sisters and Myrtle Hoffman. 

ROCHE JOINS REGIMENT 

Harry B. Roche, of the Corse Pay ton 

Stock Co., received a telegram Wednesday 

at the Fourteenth Street Theatre, New 

York, to report to the Armory, Springfield, 

Mags., that the Second Massachusetts Regi- 
ment, of which he is Drum Major had been 
called into service. 



SCHENECTADY CO. OPENING 
Schenectady, N. T., April 9. — The 
Schenectady Stock Co., headed by Mae 
Desmond, which opens a Summer engage- 
ment at the Van Curler Opera House to- 
day in "Common Clay," will have in its 
cast: Frank Fielder, Franklin George, 
Albert Hickey, Guy Hitner, Lyle Clement, 
Samuel Godfrey, Olga Grey, Millie Hutch- 
inson and Maude Allen. Gordon Reid is 
director of the company. 



"HAPPY" LOU WHITNEY CLOSES 

Anderson, Ind., April 7.— "Happy" 
Lou Whitney and her associate' players 
completed an engagement of ten months 
at the Crystal Theatre last Saturday. 
Managers Welsh and Walbourn and the 
little star are planning a four weeks' tour 
of the country in their new limousine 
before putting the company under canvas 
for the Summer season. 



JrlACKETT LEAVES WILKES CO. 

Seattle, Wash., April 6. — Norman 
Hackett will make his farewell appearance 
as leading man with the Wilkes Players 
at the Orpheum Theatre tomorrow night 
in "The Man from Home." He will im- 
mediately leave for the East, where he 
has accepted a contract for a starring en- 
gagement. Alexis Luce will succeed him. 



POLI WORCESTER CO. OPENS 

Worcester, Mass., April 9.— The Poli 
Stock Co. opens here tonight with "Mile 
a Minute Kendall." Grayce Scott will 
play leads, and the company will include 
Ivan Miller, H. J. Briggs, Jack Squire, 
Samuel Godfrey and Frances Stamford. 



ADELAIDE KEIM IN BRIDGEPORT 

Bridgeport, Conn., April 7. — Adelaide 
Keim baa succeeded Frances McGrath as 
leading lady with the Lyric Players this 
week, opening in the first presentation on 
any stage of a new play by Hutchinson 
Boyd, entitled "The Tidal Wave." 

SCENIC ARTIST MARRIES 

Spokane, Wash., April 6. — Frank Tay- 
lor, scenic artist of the Wilkes Players 
at the American Theatre, and acting stage 
manager in the absence of Neil McKinnon, 
was married March 28 to Stella Green, a 
non-professional. 

NEWARK CO. OPENS 

Newark, N. J., April 10.— The Jay 
Packard Stock Co. opened at the Orpheum 
Theatre here yesterday in "Common Clay" 
for a ten-weeks' engagement. The com- 
pany is headed by Dudley Ayres and 
Maude Gilbert. 



COMPTON-PLUMB CO. CLOSES 
Racine, Wis., April 6. — The Compton- 
Plumb Stock Co. has closed its engage- 
ment at the Orpheum Theatre here and is 
making preparations for the opening of 
the tent season. 



MAUDE FEALY WITH DENVER CO. 

Denver, Colo.. April 7. — Macde Fealy 
succeeds Leah Winslow as leading woman 
of- the Den ham Players at the Den ham 

Theatre. 



STOCK CO. WINS 

INJUNCTION 

SUIT 



LONA FENDELL BEATS MOROSCO 



Fond du Lac, Wis., April 7. — A de- 
cision of interest to the theatrical world 
was handed down by Circuit Judge Chester 
A. Fowler Monday, when he dissolved the 
injunction which had been issued against 
the Lona Fendell Stock Co., enjoining it 
from presenting the play, "Peggy." 

Oliver Morosco, who is the owner of the 
producing rights to the dramatization, "Peg 
o* My Heart," written by J. Hartley Man- 
ners, brought suit against the Lona Fen- 
dell Players to restrain . them from . pre- 
senting the play "Peggy" or "Life pf My 
Heart" on the ground that it was a piracy 
and imitation of the play, "Peg o' My 
Heart.". 

The circuit judge, after reading both 
plays, found that the charge of violating 
the copyright of the play "Peg o' My 
Ufart," and the injunction against show- 
ing "Peggy" could not be sustained. 

According to the findings of the court 
"Peg o' My Heart" was written in 1911 
and 1912, shown as a play, and later ex- 
panded by the author, Manners, into a 
novel, which was copyrighted. The other 
play, "Peggy," was written in 1911 by 
Daniel J. Fendell, and was shown in Can- 
ada, apparently without the knowledge of 
the author that there was such a play as 
the Morosco production. 

The court said : "If one play is as ranch 
the original conception and the result of 
original mental labor of the one producing 
it, as another play is of its author, the 
authors are equally entitled to tbe fruits 
of their original labors, notwithstanding the 
works be similsr." 

The order of the court was that judg- 
ment be entered dismissing the complaint 
on the merits, with costs, and dissolving 
the temporary injunction heretofore entered 
herein. 



BROWN ENGAGES MONTREAL CO. 

Montreal. Can., April 9. — The com- 
pany which Clark Brown has engaged to 
play the Orphenm Theatre, here, opening 
May 7 in "Along Came Ruth," will include 
Frances McGrath and Ed. T. Woodruff 
in the leads, and George Farren, W. Olathe 
Miller, Leander Cordova, Edith Blande, 
Eta Mansfield, Balva Morrell, Claire Mas- 
lin, Louis Wolford and Joseph Cusack. 
Percy Meldon will be stage director, and 
Russell Senior, scenic artist. 



STOCK REOPENS IN PHILA. 
Philadelphia, April 7. — The Knicker- 
bocker Theatre returns to stock to-night 
with the presentation of "A Pair of Sixes." 
Carl Miller has organized a new company, 
which includes Howard R. Han and Hath 
Robinson in the leading roles, and Marie 
Reels, Earle Western and Marie Stamford. 



MARCH CO. TENDERED DINNER 

Bangor, Me., April 8. — An All Fools* 
Day dinner was tendered the members of 
March's Merry Makers at the Penobscot 
Exchange Hotel last Sunday by the man- 
agement of the company. 



LYRIC CO. TO PRODUCE "SAVAGE" 
BiiiDGEFOBT, Conn., April 9. — "The Sav- 
age," a new play by Hutchinson Boyd, will 
be presented for the first time on any 
stage by the Lyric Players during the week 
of April 23. 



NEW WOMAN IN SHUBERT CO. 

Milwaukee, April 7. — Gertrude Ritchie 
is the new second woman of the Shubert 
Co. . . 



CHASE-LISTER CO. ROSTER 

The roster of the Chase-Lister Co. 
(Northern) includes Glenn F. Chase, Ray- 
mond Ketchum, Tewks O'Dare. Frank R. 
Dare, C. S. Ackley, Bush Burrichter, Sara 
Treadwell, Ora Vanning, OnaSteck, Mil- 
dred Hastings. Florine Driesbach and Flora 
Loew. 



WILSON JOINS MOZART PLAYERS 

E t.MTR A , N. Y., April a — Charles 0. 
Wilson opens to-morrow as the new lead- 
ing man with the Mozart Players in "Stop 
Thief." He succeeds Edward Everett 
Horton, who opens tomorrow in Scranton 
in "Common Clay." 



EMMA CARRTNCTON IN PHILA. 

Philadelphia, Pa., April 7. — Emma 
Carrington, who for the last two seasons 
was with the Mozart Theatre Co., Elmira, 
X. Y., opened today with the Knicker- 
bocker Stock Co., here, for the Spring and 
Summer seasons. 



PAULINE LORD IN MILWAUKEE 

Milwaukee, April 7. — Alice Bentley is 
in ber last week as leading lady of the 
Shubert Stock Co. Pauline Lord will 
join next Monday as the new leading lady, 
opening in "Rio Grande." 



POST CO. TO LEAVE FRISCO 

San Francisco, April 6. — Tbe Jim 
Post Musical Stock Co. which has been 
playing to big houses at the Majestic 
Theatre, closes its season the middle of 
April and goes to Stockton. 



GIFFORD YOUNG CO. RESUMES 

Chicago, April 9. — Easter Sunday 
marked the resumption of the Gilford 
Young Co.'s offering of royalty stock plays 
in tbe Wisconsin territory after at ten- 
day lay-off. 



MT. VERNON CO. CLOSING 

The Frank Wilcox Co. at the Little 
Playhouse, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., closes April 
81 and Wilcox asd Minna Gombel will 
leave to head the company in Syracuse. 



EVARTS CLOSES IN BRIDGEPORT 

Bridgeport, Conn., April 7. — William 
Evarts closes to-night with the Lyric Play- 
ers, and goes to Portland, Me., opening 
Monday with the Keith Stock Co. there. 



STOCK ACTOR RECOVERS 

Oakland, Cal, April 6.— Jos. Gail- 
braitb, one-time popular leading man in 
coast stock companies, has recovered from 
what threatened to be a serious illness. 

. — — — - . ! 



MUSICAL CO. FOR ALLENTOWN 

Allentowr, Pa., April 8. — A musical 
stock company is going to play at the Lyric 
Theatre this summer, with May Wallace 
in the leading role. 



MUSICAL STOCK FOR ELMIRA 

Et.mtba, N. Y., April 8. — Boehm A 
Richards are engaging tbe cast for a musi- 
cal stock company to open May 28 at 
Rorick'a Glen Park. 



LEAH WINSLOW COMING EAST 
Leah Winslow has closed with the Den- 
ham Players in Denver and is returning 
East She will shortly be seen in a 
Broadway production. 



HALIFAX CO. CLOSES 

Halifax, Can., April 7. — The Academy 
of Music Players closed their season here 
last Saturday, making the close of their 
fifth year in Halifax. 



LEFFERTS RESTING IN NEW YORK 

H. Borden Lefferts has just arrived in 
town, having closed with a stock com- 
pany in St. Louis. He will rest during 
the Summer. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room Hi 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



CHICAGO 



FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Randolph 5423 



HODKINS IS JOINING 

TWO V AUDEVIL LE CIRCUITS 

Makes Trip Over Southwest Route Preparatory to Annexing It 

with the Pantages Chain at San Diego or 

Some Other Point 



Charles E. Hodkins, booking manager 
of the Southwest Vaudeville Managers' 
Association, has returned to Chicago after 
a two' week's tour of the circuit, made 
in order to lay out plans for connecting 
the Southwest and Pantages Circuits in 
the most advantageous way. 

In looking over the houses on the South- 
west Circuit, which are to be affiliated 
with the Pantages next season, Mr. Hod- 
kins came across a plan, which it seems, 
he will most likely adopt, of having the 
Pantages shows go from San Diego, Cal., 
into Texas territory. This route wonla 



take the shows from San Diego, Cal. to 
El Paso, Tex., to San Antonio, to Hous- 
ton, to Galveston, to Waco, to Dallas, to 
Shreveport, La., and possibly to New Or- 
leans, Oklahoma City, Okla. and Spring- 
field, Mo. 

However, other plans are under con- 
sideration and the final decision will not 
be announced for several weeks. 

It is very probable that J. C. Matthews, 
of the Chicago Pantages office, will handle 
the bookings and that Hodkins will rep- 
resent the circuits in a capacity wi mil n r to 
that now held with the Southwest. 



ELEPHANT PLAYS FIDDLE 

Because Singling Bros.' elephant trainer 
thought the well-known scene wherein the 
big beasts converse over telephones had 
become hackneyed through repeated per- 
formances, be made an endeavor to ' cut 
it out" for the Chicago opening. When 
the management beard of this, they told 
him to keep the scene in by all means, 
as they felt no small measure of the big 
■how's success was directly due to this 
feature. But the elephant man insisted 
upon finding some innovation and thinks 
be discovered it in the shape of a monster 
fiddle, which one elephant plays while an- 
other beats time on a big bass drum. 

HAS NOVEL CENSOR IDEA 

Mrs. Alfred Hamburger, wife of the Chi- 
cago moving picture promoter, told a sub- 
committee of the legislative licenses com- 
mittee that an ideal censorship bill should 
provide that moving pictures for adults 
should not be censored, whereas those in- 
tended for children should be strictly cen- 
sored. Her speech was made in connec- 
tion with the rigid State censorship bill 
recently introduced in the Legislature. 



STROLLERS OPEN CLUB ROOMS 

The Strollers formally opened their new 
club rooms at 117 North Clark street, 
next door to the Cohan Grand Opera 
House, Friday night, with "The Days of 
'40," an entertainment which has been 
made popular largely through the efforts 
of Stroller "Bill" Rice, chairman of the 
committee. The committee also in- 
cludes John Bernero, Lew Cantor, Harry 
La Mack, M. H. Barnes, Orville Bunnell 
and George S. Van. 



WOOLFOLK PLANS 3 NEW TABS 

Boyle Woolfolk has arranged for the 
presentation of three new tabloids, Norris 
and Thurston In a new musical comedy, 
"The -20th Century Whirl" and the new 
edition "Junior Follies," with Mabel Walzer. 
Among the old attractions, which will be 
re-routed, are "Vanity Fair," "Sunnyside 
of Broadway," "Woolfolk Musical Comedy 
Co." and "Six Little Wives." 



WILLIAMS & W ATKINS QUIT 
Williams and Watkins have been taken 
out of the cast of "He's In Again," as 
Knute Erickson, it is said, resented their 
being featured in the show, though their 
contract read that way. Boyle " Woolfolk 
is playing tbem on Association time. 

AMERICAN HOSPITAL OPENS SOON 

The new American theatrical hospital 
will open on or about April IS. When 
completed it will represent a total cost of 
about $200,000, of which $15,000 has been 
subscribed by theatrical folks. B. F. Keith 
contributed the operating room. 

TWO PERFORMERS SICK 

Two performers, recently at local thea- 
tres, are under "Doe" Miller's care. Herb- 
ert Brooks was injured at McVicker's 
while performing Us "steel trunk stunt"; 
Harry EUis, the tenor, recently at the Pal- 
ace, has throat trouble. 



BRAZEE PRODUCING ACTS 

J. C. Bra zee is planning to produce two 
new girl acts. "Roaming Romeos," featur- 
ing Billy Bachelor, ia In seven scenes, with 
fourteen people, and will open in vaude- 
ville about the middle of May. "Winning 
a Queen," with ten people, will open at 
the same time, probably on the Pantages 
Circuit, under the management of J. 
Boyd Brazee. 



THEATRE DANGER INCREASED 

The double platoon system recently in- 
augurated by the Chicago fire department 
is a source of great danger for Chicago's 
smaller theatres. No satisfactory provision 
has been made for a proper increase of the 
city's fire inspection force. That portion 
which previously inspected smaller thea- 
tres has been curtailed considerably. 



COLEMAN TO CHANGE TITLE 

Hamilton S. Coleman will launch his 
show again next season but under 
n new title. The attraction played the 
International circuit last season with the 
title "When a Girl Loves." The company 
will tour one-night stands. 



'THE BOOMERANG" CLOSING 

After an exceptionally successful season, 
"The Boomerang" is filling in its last two 
weeks at Powers'. It will be followed by 
"Seven Chances," another Belasco offering. 



BOURKE IS M. P. PRESS AGENT 

Thomas Edmund Bourke, a local editor, 
will be press agent for this season's Mo- 
tion Picture Exhibitor's League Conven- 
tion, opening July 14, at the Coliseum. 



HOUSES HAVE GOOD HOLY WEEK 

Chicago's loop theatres did good busi- 
ness during Holy Week, with few excep- 
tions. "Turn to the Right" showed a big 
receipts increase over the previous week. 

GOOD PUBLICITY STUNT 

The "Joan, the Woman" girls, from the 
Colonial Theatre, where the picture of that 
name is featured, .took active part in Chi- 
cago's recent recruiting agitation. 



U. B. O. TO MOVE 

The United Booking Association will 
move its offices to 609 Crilly building, in 
Chicago, shortly. . . 



WESTERN ACT SEEN HERE 

Mosaman and Vance, a team from the 
Pacific Coast, appeared at the Crown 
Theatre last week in a new act. 



N AZ1MOVA COMING APRIL 23 

Nazimova, last seen here in vaudeville 
with "War Brides," will come to the 
Blackstone, Monday, April 23, with 
" 'Option Shoals." Julia Arthur will con- 
clude her presentation of "Seremonda" the 
preceding Saturday night. 



ACTRESS ASSISTS POUCE 

Lillian Williams, an actress, assisted the 
Chicago police, last week, in rounding up 
a youthful gang of desperados. Her hus- 
band, Sam Williams, is being sought in 
connection with the case. 



MRS. HUMPHREY RECOVERING 

Mrs. Claude S. Humphrey, wife of 
"Tink" Humphrey, Western manager of 
the U. B. O., is recovering from an opera- 
tion. 



U. & O. BOOKS AMEDIO 

Amedio, who was seen at the Rialto re- 
cently, opens shortly for a tour of eastern 
U. B. O. time, starting at the Harris The- 
atre in Pittsburgh, Pa. 



NAME ACTRESS IN DIVORCE 

Pearl Gillmann, a movie actress, was 
named in a divorce action brought by Mrs. 
Jane W. Lawrence, against her husband, 
Charles H., a broker. 



CUNNINGHAM IS BACK 

Will Cunningham, of the Associated 
Agency, is back in Chicago after a visit 
to New York and Detroit 



NEW ACT FOR KELLY * FERN 

Kelly and Fern have a new act "in the 
writing process." It will be called "When 
East and West Meet." 



HOSPITAL BENEFIT MAY 20 

The Annual benefit for the American 
Theatrical Hospital will take place at the 
Auditorium, May 20. 



PRESS CLUB GIVES FROLIC 
The Press Club of Chicago entertained 
the Press Club of Milwaukee with a frolic, 
last week. 



HARRY LA TOY RETURNS 

Harry La Toy is back in Chicago after 
a long season on the W. V. M. A. time. 

SAYS ARMSTRONG LEFT $494 

Mrs. Paul Armstrong, wife of the late 
playwright, has filed a statement in the 
Surrogate's Court to the effect that the 
playwright left only $494.94, out of which 
she has since expended $340.15. This ac- 
counting was made at the instigation of 
the Kirke La Shelle Co. in an effort to 
collect their $19,333.59 recovered against 
the estate. 



APPEALS HAMMERSTEIN VICTORY 

Aijian y, N. Y., April 6. — Florencio Con- 
stantino yesterday submitted to the Court 
of Appeals an appeal from the order of 
the lower court affirming a judgment in 
favor of Oscar Hammerstein for $30,102.38, 
and denying a motion for a new trial. 



ACTOR'S BROTHER DEAD 

Rev. Wm. Brace Findlay, brother of 
Thomas Findlay, the well known actor, 
died recently in Toronto, Can. Mr. Find- 
lay was the founder and superintendent of 
the Toronto Municipal Farm. 



WALTONS RETURN TO CENTURY 

Maurice and Florence Walton returned 
to "The Century Girl" cast Monday night 
with a new feature called "El Damon," 
the national dance of Cuba. 



NORTHAMPTON SEASON ENDS 

Nobthamton, Mass., April 9. — The 
present season of the Little Theatre here 
ends this week. 



KLEIN ESTATE SETTLED - 

_ The Surrogate Court has signed a decree 
directing the executors of the will of the 
late Charles Klein to distribute the re- 
maining assets of the estate as follows: 
$1,765.07 for their commissions; $50 to a 
special guardian; $331.25 to the referee. 
The balance of $87,099.85 is to be turned 
over to Mrs. Klein, she being the residuary 
legatee. 

In the Surrogate's Court, last July, the 
executors charged themselves with $168,- 
507.72. Against this they credited them- 
selves with a $11,000 note made by Arch 
Selwyn, of Norwalk, Conn. ; $13,063.12 for 
administration, debts, creditors and in- 
heritance taxes; $29,750 given to Philip; 
$19,850 to Mrs. Klein, in trust for the 
infant son; $5,000 to Herman; $1,000 to 
Manuel, showing a balance of $80,244.60 
for further distribution. 



LIGHT OPERA FOR BURBANK 

Los Angeles, April 7. — Louis Gott- 
scbalk is shortly to inaugurate a season 
of light opera and musical comedy at the 
old Burbank Theatre. William Weight- 
man, millionaire sportsman, is financing 
the venture. In the cast will be William 
Danforth, Edward Martindale, Ursula 
March and Virginia Foltz. The initial of- 
fering will be "The Mikado." 

"BOOMERANG" CO. KEPT INTACT 

David Belasco has decided that the com- 
pany playing "The Boomerang" shall con- 
tinue during the coming Summer, which 
will be the second Summer for this play 
with its original company. Following its 
run at Power's Theatre, Chicago, the 
show will go to the Pacific Coast for a 
tour during the heated term and will work 
last in the Fall. 



ELECTION HALTS CABARETS 

Si-uinohii.d, 111., April 7. — Cabarets in 
Springfield, the Illinois State capital, were 
voted out of existence by Tuesday's "dry" 
victory. This city has oeen the scene of 
vari-colored entertainments in the rear of 
saloons. The result of this week's election 
dooms all classes of cabarets. 



THEATRE LIEN DISMISSED 

The mechanics' lien, .secured against the 
New York Theatre; for work done in deco- 
rating the roof garden, • was dismissed in 
a decision handed down by Supreme Court 
Jusice Cohalan last week, when he held 
that Wm. Morris, who ordered the work 
done, was never a tenant. 



ROYCE MADE DIRtCTOR 
Elliott, Comstock and Gent, have en- 
gaged Edward A. Royce as general stage 
director for their musical - production. 
Royce, for more than twenty years had 
been stage director of the George Ed- 
wardes productions at the Gaiety Theatre, 
London, Eng. 

"BAD BOY" OPENING UNDER TENT 

Shawnee, Okla., April 6. — Ernest Har- 
rington will have "Peck's Bad Boy" under 
the white tops this summer. The com- 
pany will enjoy a two weeks' vacation at 
Mr. Harrington's home and headquarters 
here, and will open about April 24. 



GRAY IN ADVANCE OF SKINNER 

William H. Gray has replaced Col. 
George Hinton as advance representative 
for Otis Skinner, who is touring in "Mister 
Antonio." Hinton resigned to answer 
President Wilson's call to the colors. 



FINDS HUSBAND MARRIED 

Mrs. Alice A.' McGill Wikoff, known on 
the stage as Alva McGill, in seeking a di- 
vorce from her husband, learned that he 
had already obtained a decree and had mar- 
ried another woman. 



ADAMS' TOUR CANCELLED 

The Charles Frohman Co. has cancelled 
the California tour arranged for Maude 
Adams this spring in order to permit her 
to remain at the Empire Theatre. 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




. .. Fo un <W in 11SJ J»jr Frank Qum ... .. 

Published by the 
CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Or land W. Vaughan... President and Secretary 

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ORLAND W. VAUCHAN, EDITOR 

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NEW YORK, APRIL 11, 1917 

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York City. !. A 

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Answers to Queries 

A. P., New York. — There is considerable 
difference between n playlet and a' one- 
act play, just as there is between a abort - 
story and a tale. "The playlet has single 
ness of character and is very much com- 
pressed. A one-act play is not necessarily 
compressed; it may be glower in charac- 
ter revelation and have incorporated in it 
incidents that are more or less foreign to 
the action.' It might even have a sub- 
plot. Aa far aa the sketch is concerned, 
it may have bat the bare nucleus of a plot. 
With the first two forms plot is every- 
thing. The clerk at the library will give 
you information as to where to get litera- 
ture on these forms. There are a thousand 
definitions for drama — some one has put it 
concisely as "the clash of wills and the 
outcome." 

• * « 

S. P. F-— Archie White, formerly with 
the Dupreze and Benedicts minstrels, is 
dead. 

• • • 

X. Y. Z. — "The Three of Hearts" was 
produced June 3, 1915, at the Thirty-ninth 
Street Theatre. 

• ♦ • 

K. I. G., Harlem. — The last performance 
at Niblo's Garden was given March 28, 
1895. "My Aunt Bridget" was the attrac- 
tion. 

• 4> a 

T. E. F. — James K. Hackett first became 
prominent as leading man of Daniel Proh- 
msu's Lyceum Theatre, Twenty-fourth 
Street and Fourth Avenue. 

• * * 

D. O. — Charles Ross and Mabel Fenton 
were members of the Weber & Fields Co. 
at their music hall for several seasons. 



Claim, Idea U~d In Act 

Editor Tux New York Cufpkb: 

Dear Sir— 1 beg leave to call your at- 
tention to the fact that I am the author 
of and the holder of copyright covering a 
vaudeville comedy act in 1, 1% or 2, en- 
titled "The House Painter's Apprentice." 
The novelty in said act is in the use of a 
painter's scaffold. 

On Monday last, at the Royal Theatre, 
Bronx, I witnessed a performance by Rice 
& Werner entitled "On the ScafBold," by 
Blanche Merrill, and Tax New York 
Clipfeb of April 5 contains a laudatory 
article with reference to same, Miss Merrill 
being credited with an originui idea in 
vaudeville. 

I will thank yon to call the attention 
of the profession through your columns to 
my claim that Miss Merrill's production is 
an infringement on my rights, and it is 
my intention to tske all necessary legal 
steps to insure ogainst anyone offending 
in this respect. Cordially yours, 

Ttmotut D. Lyons. 

471 Forty-first Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
April 6, 1017. 



Theatre* Can Aid Patriotism 

Editor The New Yobk Clipper: 

Dear Sir: Now that thp war cloud has 
swooped down upon us a great responsi- 
bility rests upon tie stage and the per- 
former — in morn wh.vs than one. Those 
connected with the theatre can do much 
toward instilling our people with patriot- 
ism or, inverse!}, can do much to harm 
the American cause 

I suppose that, no doubt, jiany actors 
and theatrical folk "I Jl answer the call of 
the colors. But tl one who remain at 
home can also be of ■ great service to onr 
country. 



""I""""""""'""""' iMmammaaiMllMMnaniiii— ihiiiibiiihiiii ;i 



Correspondents Wanted 



'" '- r THECLIF'ER 



Wishes Live, Wide- Awake Representative? 

EVERYWHERE 

NEWSPAPER MEN PREFERRED 



luouimsiuiiiuiiaiiJiiiuiiiiiiiuiuuuLiiui 



M. B. M. — William Faversham succeed- 
ed Henry Miller as leading man at the 
Empire Theatre, 

• • • 

P. O. — John Drew left Augustine Daly's 
Co. to become a star under the manage- 
ment of Charles Frohman. 

• • • 

8. B, B„ Pittsburgh.— Wm. Scanlon 
was under Augustus Pltou's management- 
Chauncey Olcott succeeded him as Pitoa'a 

Irish star. 

• • • 

X. Y. Z. — B. H. Sothern was a mem- 
ber of the Lyceum Theatre stock under 
the management of Daniel Frobman. 80 
was Virginia Hs'rned. 

• • '• 

J. H. — The Empire Theatre was opened 
early In 1893 with "The Girl I Left Be- 
hind Me" as the opening attraction. 

• • • 

G. B. — Paul McAllister was leading man 
with the F. F. Proctor Stock Co. for sev- 
eral years, and Adelaide Kelm was leading 
woman. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

George Broadhurst leased the South 
Chicago Opera House. 

Newplays: "The American Minister," 
with Wm. H. Crane; "The Golden Lad- 
der." with Edwin F. Thorn e; "The For- 
resters"; "The Minister"; "Chums"; "A 
Temperance Town"; "The Worldling." 

John F. Griffin and Jas. F. Carroll were 
sparring with Bob Fitzsinunons' company. 

Wm. Jerome, John Queen and Arthur 
Rigby formed a partnership. ■ . . 



RIALT0 RATTLES 



RHYMED INTERVIEW, HO. 3. 

Sam H. Rothapfel has versatility. He 
van do a million kinds of things with like 
facility. Most fellows think they're lucky 
if they do one thing well. But not so 
with our hero; our clever Rothapfel I He 
manages a playhouse and rakes in lota of 
dough, receiving real good greenbacks for 
a moving picture show. Then, when he 
wants diversion, be fires his leader man 
and directs his hired musicians as only 
genius can. He is also a composer, and, 
wher. he leads his men, they are sure to 
play the "Friars' March," the product of 
his pen. Some day you may bear him sing- 
ing solos at his show, and the audience will 
have to listen since they've paid their hard- 
earned dough. 

THE NAKED TRUTH. 

"The Very Naked Boy" lasted one per- 
formance at the Colonial. But there's a 
reason! If It had been named "The Very 
Naked Girl" It would have been necessary 
to put the S. R. O. sign out and call out 
the police reserves. 

ALL WERE KEPT AWAKE. 

With "The Awakening of Spring" every- 
one in the audience woke up, too. 

SOUNDS LIKE A SENTENCE, 

A. H. Woods has a play entitled "30 
Days." Maybe that's what the author 
will get when it's produced. 

A BIG BOOM. 

If "The Big Drum," which Is being sent 
over here from England, makes as much 
noise as its name implies it will be quite 
a hit. 



NAMED CORRECTLY. 

"The Great Divide" had a $10,000 week 
at the Standard Theatre, whereupon there 
was a great divide. 



In the first place, the actor should real- . 
ize that the war is a most serious matter 
and should in no way refer lightly to it 
upon the stage. He should make no jokes 
about recruiting, running away from bul- 
lets, the advisability of sending the crip- 
ples to war first and other matters along 
these lines. 

Neither should he sing any wishy- 
washy parodies about Uncle Sam nor re- 
sort to references ot patriotism to gain 
applause. This all tends to make patriot- 
ism a cheap thing and to lessen patriotic 
ardor in the long run. 

The war and the flag should not be re- 
ferred to except in the most reverend 
way. Good, strong and red-blooded war 
songs sung with proper fervor are always 
in place. Well-written patriotic recita- 
tions will serve a oommer. table purpose. 
Spirited references to the flag should be 
welcomed in a performer's act. But every 
performer should carefully avoid cheap 
stuff and milk-and-water patriotism. 

It would not be a bad idea for theatres 
to drape the boxes and galleries with 
Americas flags. An enlistment appeal in 
the theatre programs would also be' one 
way of materially aiding the nation. 

Tbo news pictorial", with scenes of 
military activity, are stimulating, too. 

In short, I. think that the theatre can 
do a lot of real good iu arousing this 
country to greater patriotism, but they 
should be careful sot to overdo their ef- 
forts to the end of cheapening and sham- 
ing the flag. 

I know that T11* Clipper has consider* 
able Influence, and hope you will print 
this where it will meet the eye of the 
majority of theatrical persons. 

Dun-to, Minn. Mervtn Htmaw. 



NUMBER, PLEASE. 

All that we can say about the play, "On 
the Telephone," in which about three- 
fourths of each part will be played by the 

actors off etaure, their voices being heard 
through the 'p nono by the audience, is 
that the whole thing sounds phony. 

WHO SAID IT WAS? 

The Colored Players, who are playing 
next door to Barnum A Bailey's Show, 
have an announcer in .front of the door 
who informs those going in that This 
is not the circus." 



THE CULINARY DEFT. 

After "Pa^rla" Keith houses will no 
longer have cereals on their vaudeviUe 
menus. 



SHE'D CHASE THEM AWAY. 

Mrs. Castle announces that she eaa't 
play vaudeville. TIs better so, for If ths 
public saw her. lulled in front of a vaude- 
ville house they'd think it was another 
"Patria." 



ANOTHER MAN GOES WRONG. 

It is said that Mase Gnmble has joined 
the ranks of spring posts. 

PHILIPP, THE UNASSUMING. 

Adolf Pbilipp is to revive "Auction 
Pinochle." Author, Adolf Phillpp. Pro- 
ducer, Adolf Philip p. Manager, Adolf 
Phillpp. Leading man, Adolf Pbilipp. 
Theatre owner, Adolf PhOipp. Door- 
keeper, no! What d'ye want from one 
poor man? 

THE BIG SMOKE. 

There will soon be an N. V. A. cigarette 
on the market, we are told. Why not in- 
dorse the Chesterfield cigarette and save 
a lot of trouble? 



AMERICAN FROM NOW ON. 

Pete "Teuton" Schmid, publicity pur- 
veyor for Artcraft films, wishes it known 
in the future he would like to be ad- 
dressed as Pete "Americus" Schmid. 
That'll help some, Pete! 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 




CLYDE SHOWS 

WILL OPEN 

APRIL 24 

STREATOR TO SEE IT FIRST 



Stbeatob, 111., April 7. — The official 
opening of the Clyde World nt Home Shows 
for the 1917 season will take place here 
April 24. 

The Winter quarters of the organization 
is the scene of much activity, as work is 
being rushed in preparation for the open- 
ins- Robert Williams, general superintend- 
dent, and George T. McCarthy, assistant 
manager, are supervising t he repairing, and 
artists and artisans are at work on the 
repainting and redecorating of the equip- 
ment. 

The engagement in Streator will be for 
fivf days on the fair grounds. On account 
of tnp enlargement of the outfit it was at 
first thought that no suitable location could 
be obtained and that the shows would 
have to pass up their home town, but ar- 
rangements were completed whereby they 
could secure the fair grounds, and so this 
will be their opening site. 

E. L. Davenport has been engaged by 
James T. Clyde as general agent for the 
Shows for the season. Mr. Davenport suc- 
ceeds John P. McGrail, who resigned sev- 
eral weeks ago to enter another line of 
business, 

William Jndkins Hewitt will be back 
with the World at Home Shows this sea- 
son and not in advance. He is now at the 
office here. 



WANT CIRCUS LICENSE CUT 

Nashville. Tenn., April 8. — A new 
revenue bill has been introduced in both 
houses of the legislature to cut the State 
tax on circuses in Tennessee in half. 
Counties of 50,000 or over formerly bad to 
pay (200 a day, but this measure would 
cut it to $100. Counties between 40,000 
and 50.000 have been cat from $150 to $75. 



FLEMING'S MOTHER DIES 

Cleveland, O.. April 7. — James Flem- 
ing, who has the privilege car with the 
Yankee Robinson Circus, mourna the loss 
of his mother, who died at her son's home 
here last week. The body was shipped to 
Lockport, N. V., for interment. 



CANTON PARK CHANGES HANDS 

Canton, O., April 7. — The Myers Lake 
Park bas passed into the control, of the 
N. O. T. 4 L. Co., and C. Y. Riddles will 
remain in charge as manager. The amuse- 
ment resort will be ready to open May 30. 



BAY VIEW PARK REOPENING 

Pensacola, Fla., April 6. — The work on 
the general repairing of Bayview Park has 
begun, preparatory to its re-opening May 
1. A new high dive is being constructed 
and or her changes being made. 



RUTH LAW WILL ENLIST 

Kuril Law returned last week after two 
months at the British nnd French flying 
fronts, and announces that she will enlist 
in the Aviation Corps when this country 
eiters the war. 



FLORIDA WITH RUTHERFORD 

Pittsbubgh. April 7. — George Alabama 
Florida has been re-engaged by Harry Po- 
laek to go in advance of the Rutherford 
Greater Shows for the coming season. 



BREMERMAN SIGNED BY THONET 
Wm. Bremennan. for'the past five years 
with the Meyerhoff staff, has been signed 
by Joseph Tbonet to manage his Great Ex- 
celsior Shows. 



"RUBE" GREEN INJURES ARM 

Alvin (Rube) Green, of the Barnum & 
Bailey Show, severely bruised his right 
arm while doing his specialty in Thurs- 
day night's show. After having his comic 
altercation with one of the ushers, he 
was thrown out of the grandstand, in ac- 
cordance with his regular routine, but 
missed seeing the approach of a bareback 
rider, and was injured by her horse. 
Green was only incapacitated for one-per- 
formance, and is again working with the 
show, although his arm is still bruised. 



BENEFIT FOR HAMILTON FUND 

An entertainment will be given by the 
Barnum & Bailey Show at Madison 
Square Garden, Sunday evening, for the 
benefit of the Tody Hamilton Fund. Every 
press agent in New York City will become 
a member of the Entertainment Commit- 
tee and will lend his aid toward making 
the affair a success. One of the features 
will be a dinner served to the press agents 
in the arena, at which time they will be 
treated to a regular circus meal, tin plates 
cupB, saucers and all. 

' CLYDE GETS "WALL OF DEATH" 

Atlanta, Ga., April 7. — Wm. A. Sanges, 
president of the Sanges Amusement Co., 
of this city, bas closed contracts with the 
World at Home Shows for his sensational 
attraction known as the "Wall of Death," 
which will be one of the features of that 
organization this season. This device will 
be shipped from here to Streator, HI, this 
week, and will be due there about April 
15. 



FRISCO C«CUS GROUNDS SOLD 

San Francisco, April T. — The Al G. 
Barnes Circus, which opened a four days' 
engagement here this morning, will be the 
last cirens to play on the old jilrcua 
grounds. The McCreery Estate Co., owner 
of the old show grounds, has let a contract 
for a building on the corner and excavation 
will be begun shortly after the Barnes 
Circus leaves. 



THONET CHANGES SHOW TITLE 

Pittsburgh, Pa., April 7. — Joseph H. 
Thonet has 'decided to change the title of 
his carnival from the Great International 
Shows to the Great Excelsior Shows, and 
announces that all -contracts made with 
the Great International Shows hold good. 
The show will open April 19 at Brad- 
dack. Pa. 



CLARKONIANS PLAN NEW ACT 

Chicago. April 0. — The Clarks, known 
as the C!arkon::inn, for many years a 
standard features with Ringling Bros., are 

planning a new act, entirely away from 
their usual class of work, to be presented 
as a special feature of the circus, under 
a separate name classification. 



OAKLAND PARK OPENS 

Oakland, Cal., April 6. — Neptune Beach 
and Park, Alameda's new $500,000 amuse- 
ment park, opened for the season March 
31, with a big aquatic carnival and ath- 
letic program. The park has the largest 
swimming tank on the coast, and will ac- 
commodate 8.000 bathers. 



FORBIDS STREET EXHIBITIONS 

St. Joseph. Mo., April 6. — The city 
council has passed an ordinance prohibit- 
ing carnivals, fairs or similar exhibitions 
from being held on the streets of St. 
Joseph. This does not apply to carnivals 
which lease grounds and hold their shows 
on them. 



CHERRY ENLARGING SHOW 

McAijester, Okla., April 6. — Mr. Cherry, 
of the Rubin and Cherry Shows, which ex- 
hibited here last week, announces that the 
show will be enlarged and several new at-' 
tractions added when the organization 
reaches Pavsons, Kan., the last of this 
month. 



OUTDOOR MEN 

TO ORGANIZE 

F0R_WAR 

SHANTON TO HEAD DETACHMENT 



Proof that the men of the outdoor show 
world are ready and willing to do their 
hit in defending Old Glory is evidenced 
in the fact that a movement is already 
under way to organize a detachment of 
outdoor showmen for active war service. 
It is estimated that when the detachment 
is completed it will have a minimum 
strength of about 1,500 men, although its 
actual quota may even double that number. 

The movement started several weeks 
ago when Frank P. Sargent wrote to Sec- 
retary of War Baker offering the serv- 
ices of outdoor showmen and asking au- 
thority to organize a detachment of Big 
Top men to aid Uncle Sam in his trouble. 
Baker sent back word that Sargent would 
be called upon to make good his offer in 
the event of the outbreak of hostilities. 

Now that war bas actually been de- 
clared, Sargent and his assistants are al- 
ready planning for the organization of the 
detachment, believing that the official order 
to assemble it is only a matter of a few 
days. 

When the detachment is formed. Major 
J. H. Shanton will head it. For more 
than eight seasons, Shanton was chief cow- 
boy with the Buffalo Bill Shows. Since 
that time, he has been connected with the 
New York monnted police and has also 
seen active service in Mexico. Heading 
the proposed outdoor showmen's detach- 
ment, he would rank as its Colonel. 

Whatever may be the initial cost of the 
organization, Sargent says tbat he is will- 
ing to personally finance it 

UON WILLED TO BROOKLYN 

Los Angeles, Cal., April 7. — According 
to the will of the late Capt. Jack Bonavita, 
"Monte," his favorite lion, is to be given 
to the children of Brooklyn. In accord- 
ance with Bonavira's wish, the animal will 
be shipped East at an early date and take 
up his permanent abode in Prospect Park, 
Brooklyn. 



BUYS SALTER INTEREST 

PrrrsBDBou, April 8. — O. C. Brooks has 
purchased Ed.. C. Salter's interest in the 
new production, "Why Smith Left Home," 
and will manage the attraction personally. - 
Mrs. Brooks will personally look after the 
intereat of "Spidora," with the Ruther- 
ford Greater Shows. 



LA MONTS TO OPEN APRIL 28 

Salem, HI., April 8. — The La Mont 
Bros. Circus will open here Saturday, 
April 28, making the sixteenth annual tour 
through the states of Illinois, Missouri, 
Iowa and Nebraska. 



McDADE OPERATED UPON 

Memphis, Tenn., April 8.— -David Mc- 
Dade, of the Rogers Carnival Co., was 
operated on for appendicitis here last 
week at a local hospital, and is reported 
doing well. 



CEVENE TROUPE FOR CIRCUS 

CHICAGO, April 7. — The Cevene Troupe, 
which is now at McVicker's, will be with 
the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus again the 
coming season, its fifth with that show. 



RUTHERFORD SIGNS BAND 

Pittsbubgh, Ajiril 8. — Contracts have 
been signed for Fink's All-American Band 
of twenty-five pieces to tarnish the music 
for the Rutherford Greater Shows. 



MEYERHOFF LIENS SATISFIED 

Ltnchbubo, Va., April 6. — All liens 
against -the midway property of Meyerhoff, 
Inc., having been satisfied, the wagons, rid- 
ing devices and other paraphernalia, 
which have been under attachment at the 
fair grounds, were yesterday loaded on 
eleven freight cars and consigned to Jer- 
sey City, N. J., where the owner intends 

to repaint and place in shape his outfit for 
the approaching amusement season. 

The animals, which the company placed 
in Miller Park for the winter, have been 
sold to the zoological garden in Rochester, 
N. Y., and will be shipped to that point 
about May 1. E. Martens, who was in- 
terested in the ' merry-go-round, has made 
his home in Lynchburg since the fair, and 
is still here with his wife. 



DE ZAMORA WITH DORIS SHOWS 

Evalyn De Zamora, of the Mexican 
Z a mora Family, has signed for the Free 
Aerial attraction of the Mighty Doris 
Shows. She will be assisted by Fearless 
Jean Senzell, late of the Flying Senzell 
Twins. 



BARTSCH IS OWNER OF OPERETTA 

Chicago, March SI.— Hans Bartsch was 
proclaimed sole owner of the operetta, "The 
Lady in Red," in the decision handed down 
by the Circuit Court of Cook County, HI., 
last week. Bartsch made an agreement 
March 24, 1915, with B, G. Herndon, 
whereby he granted to Herndou the license 
to produce the operetta in English. Hern- 
don assigned the license to the Herndon 
Corporation and, after the operetta ran 
for four months here, the Herndon Cor- 
poration went into the hands of a receiver, 
which maintained it had the right to the 
production. The court, however, held that 
the contract between Bartsch and Herndon 
was a personal one, and that the license 
could not be assigned without Bartsch's 
consent. Since the contract expired all 
rights reverted to Bartsch. 



COURT VINDICATES MARCIN 

The United States District Court, 
through Judge Manton, has refused to 
grant an injunction restraining; further 
performances of "Cheating Cheaters," 
which was sought by Charles Eichel and 
Eugene A. Colligan, who claimed that 
Marcin and A. H. Woods had used their 
play, "Wedding Presents," in producing 
Cheating Cheaters." The court found no 
marked similarity between the two manu- 
scripts. 

DECATUR HOLDS ANNUAL SHOW 

DECATDR, 111., April 10. — The Annual 
Iroquois Theatrical Show will be held here 
tomorrow. A musical comedy, entitled, 
"Fooling His Wife," will be offered. 
Among those who will take part in the 
production are Beatrice Fagen, Joe Means, 
Frances Batty, Roy Diddle, Eva Colbert, 
Daisy Mahon and Marie Lindsey. 



TO REVIVE "PEG O' MY HEART" 

"Peg o' My Heart" will probably be re- 
vived this Spring by Oliver Morosco, who 
will put Peggy O'Neil in the title role. 
The piece, if produced, will be seen at the 
Morosco Theatre. Rumors, were afoot thai' 
Laurel te Taylor was to be seen again in 
this play, but the production of "Out 
There" made this plan unfeasible. 



ZIEGFELD RETAINS WAYBURN 

Ned Wayburn has been retained by Flo 
Ziegfeld, Jr., as general director of all 
musical plays. After putting on the new 
edition of the "Midnight Frolic," Wayburn 
will begin staging the new "Follies." 



SELLS-FLOTO DATE SET 

Te-be Haute, Ind., April 7. — The 
newly reorganized and re-constructed 
Sells-Floto Circus will exhibit here May 12. 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




KAHN ORGANIZES 
BURLESQUERS 
TCKWAR 

HAS COMPANY OF 36 ALREADY 



Ben Kalm, of the Union Square Theatre, 
has organized a unit .of the Home De- 
fense League of the 16th Precinct, which 
is attached to the staff of Police Inspector 
Dwyer of the second inspection district, 
from among the employees of his theatres 
including actors, musicians, stage and 
house employees. There are thirty-six 
in the company, and Kahn anticipates 
having fifty members before the end of 
this week. Kahn will be captain of the 
company and Frank Abbott first lieu- 
tenant. 

Drills are being held daily in the court- 
yard of the Union Square Theatre under 
the direction of a police lieutenant. Kahn 
proposes to equip the members of hia 
unit with the regulation Home Defense 
uniforms, at hia own expense. 

Kahn also intends sending out letters 
to various managers of burlesque theatres 
in New York and Brooklyn suggesting 
that they organize similar units among 
their employees and have the aggregate 
units be known as the "Theatrical Divi- 
sion" of the Home Defense League. 

The members of the Union Square com- 
pany that have eo far enrolled are: Ben 
Kahn, Frank Abbott, Sol Fields, Ralph 
Langsfeld, Sam Wrana. Chas. Collins, 
John Crosby, Jimmy Francis, Joe Ed- 
mundaon, Brad Sutton, Frank Mackey, 
Jack Hubb, George Walsh, Otto Kremm, 
Julius Hieber, Joe George, John Halpern, 
John McMahon, Nate Cunningham, Jack 
Fiaken, Chas. Bonjiano, Adam Wenicker, 
Oscar Horwitz, Jos. Pearlman, Joe Owens, 
Herman Barman, Joe Bonjiano, Adolph 
Fantilli, Irving Einhorn, Dominick Fan- 
tilll. Fred D. De Gregarlo, Harry Wood. 
Edward .1: Beebe, John Wilds and Chas. M. 
Jawitz. 



H. * S. TEAM GETTING BUSY 

Last Sunday morning, at the Lenox 
Avenue Oval, the boys of Hurtig and Sea- 
man's new theatre opened, up their base- 
ball season by beating the Alamo Cabaret 
to the tune of 8 to 1. The feature of the 
game was the pitching of Gus Smith, al- 
lowing only three hits and striking out 
twelve of the opposing batters, together 
with the batting of Howard Burkhardt 
and Dan Davenport. The Hurtig and Sea- 
man boys would like to play any team in 
the show business, Watson-Wrothe or- 
ganization preferred. Games can be ar- 
ranged through Sheriff Hook Lewis, of 
Hurtig and Seaman's Theatre. 



MRS. SCRIBNER'S MOTHER DEAD 
Mrs. Harriet E. Shields Cuerbo, sixty- 
seven years old, wife of Scfferino Cuerbo, 
and mother of Mrs. Etta Scribner, wife of 
Samuel Scribner, general manager of the 
Columbia Amusement Co., and Mrs. Lucia 
Cooper, wife of James E. Cooper, the bur- 
lesque producer, died last Saturday morn- 
ing in the Knickerbocker Hospital, after 
a short illness. Funeral services were 
held on Monday from the Taylor Funeral 
Parlors in East - Forty-fourth Street. 
Every prominent manager and producer, 
as well as performers connected with the 
Columbia and American Burlesque Cir- 
cuits attended the funeral services. 

Besides her husband and daughters, 
Mrs. Cuerbo is survived by one son, 
Celestino Cuerbo, a non-professional. 



SYLVIA BRODY HAS PARTY 

Sylvia Brody, the soubrefte with Pete 
Clark's "A New York Girt" Co., was ten- 
dered a spaghetti supper at the home of 
Lillian Smith, of the Watson "Beef Trust" 
Co.,- at her home on 'Riverside Drive, Sun- 
day night. Among those present were: 
Helen Clarkson, Carrye Bernard, Florence 
Davis, Jenny Jones (Andre Sherri- Revue), 
Chas. Brenner, Herman Smith, Sheriff 
Hook Lewis, Gus Smith, and Sam Brenner. 



MONTAGUE WRITING SHOW 

Mollie Williams has engaged Harry 
Montague, to furnish an entirely new 
show for next season, which will be known 
as "Mollie Williams' greatest show," on 
the Columbia Burlesque Wheel. Montague 
will prepare a new opening musical com- 
edy. A new elaborate closing burlesque, 
nnd a new novelty act for Miss Williams 
for the olio will be also written. 



BEN KAHN SIGNS TWO 

Bert Weston, who is with one of James 
E. Cooper's shows on the American Bur- 
lesque Circuit, and Billy "Grogan" Spen- 
cer, principal comedian with The United 
States Beauties on the same circuit, will 
again return to the Union Square Theatre 
stock company for the summer season. 
Both were members of the Kahn Stock 
Company for two seasons prior to taking 
to the road. They will make their debut 
at the Union Square Theatre on May 21. 



T. B. C. MOVES APRIL 15 
The Theatrical Burlesque Club will 
move into No. 713 Seventh Avenue on 
April 15. The club quarters will be four 
doors away from the Columbia Theatre 
and in close touch with the "burlesque 
corner" at Forty-seventh and Broadway. 
The house committee held an option on 
four different sites, but selected the 
Seventh Avenue one on account of its 
easy accessibility. 

PERKHOFF GETS CONTRACT 

Arthur Perkhoff, comedian with Joe 
Wood's "Dream Surprise Party," a vaude- 
ville act, baa been signed as principal 
comedian with one of Ben Kahn's stock 
companies at the Union Square Theatre 
for a period of three years beginning in 
September. In burlesque Perkhoff will be 
known as Arthur Parker. 



OH AY AND BARCLAY IN VAUDE. 

Irving O'llnv, formerly straight man 
with "Blutch" Cooper's Globe Trotters, 
closed with that show at the Empire Al- 
bany, and is now doing a vaudeville act 
with Don Barclay over the U. B. O. Cir- 
cuits. Francis T. Reynolds replaced him 
in the Globe Trotters company. 

KAHN LOSES THREE 

Leo Stevens, George Walsh and Jimmy 
Francis concluded their season with the 
Ben Kahn Stock Company at the Union 
Square Theatre last Saturday night. 
Walsh was a member of the company for 
more than sixty weeks. Stevens has been 
with it for twenty -five, weeks. 



FROLICS VISIT NEW YORK 

The Frolics of 1917 filled in a good week 
at the Olympic, New York, last week, 
Gladys Sears, Arthur Connelly, Lillian 
Lippman, Jim Hazleton. Al Raycob, Frank 
Wesson, Trixie Taylor and Grace English 
comprise the staff of principals. 



BURLESQUE STOCK AT GRAND 

The Lcvine & Relkin burlesque stock 
company will have its premiere on April 
30 at the Grand Street Theatre. The 
plays will be produced by George Clark. 
Among those in the cast are Michelena 
Pennitti and Eva Lewis.- 



VAIL HOLDS THEM 

Jack Strouse, Madlyn- Worth, Anna 
Vark. Harry Koler and Casper Leon are 
r ved at»ain* for next season with the 
firown-Up Babies. 



HARRY LE VAN IS 

BARRED FROM 

BOSTON 

CAN'T ACT THERE FOR 1 YEAR 



Boston, Mass., April 9. — Harry Le Van, 
the comedian of "The Big Revue of 1017," 
has been barred from appearing on a stage 
in Boston by orders of the mayor, follow- 
ing a performance which he gave at 
Howard's Athenaeum on March 12. The 
mayor states that the performance was 
suggestive and of an immoral nature, and 
that his action was taken after complaints 
had been lodged at hia office. Investiga- 
tion established their correctness, he states. 

The banishment of Le Van from any 
Boston stage was made in a letter to Man- 
ager George E. Lotbrop, which was as 
follows-: 

Crrr or Boston. 

Office of the Mayor. 

Apbil 4, 1917. 
Gkohge E. Lothbop, Esq., 

Howard Athenaeum, Boston, Mass. 
Dear Sir — Because of a complaint re- 
ceived by me from the committee of public 
amusements of this city, and which has 
been substantiated by a report in this of- 
fice, relating to the performance given at 
the Howard Athenaeum on Monday, March 
12. 1917, by Harry Le Van, the comedian 
of "The Big Revue of 1917," and ex- 
hibition being of a very suggestive and im- 
moral character, I hereby notify you that 
Hurry Le Van is prohibited by me from 
uppeoring on your stage for the period of 
one year from to-day, and yon are re- 
quested to forward a copy of this order to 
said Harry Le Van and to the .lire, -tors 
of the company of which he is a member. 
Respectfully, 

(Signed) James M. Cubi.ky. 



The order was forwarded to the Amer- 
ican Burlesque Circuit officers, and Man- 
ager George reck, in commenting upon 
the rase, was emphatic in bla statement, 
that the officials of the. A B.. C. for some 
time past have instructed ; their franchise 
holders to eliminate all objectionable ma- 
terial. They pointed out to them that 
those houses and shows presenting a strictly 
clean performance have shown a decided 
improvement over the receipts taken under 
- the old conditions. 

A new order has been sent out to all 
managers of shows, informing them that 
the producing managers would be held 
strictly accountable for any damage or loss 
of license to any bouse occasioned by the 
use of any prohibited dialogue or action 
on tiie part of any performer. 



GRACE LEWIS ENGAGED 

Grace Lewis, . who recently recovered 
from a long illness, has been engaged to 

Slay the prima donna role with the Miller 
lusical Comedy Stock Company, which 
opened its season at the Academy The- 
atre, Lowell, Mass., last Monday. Miss 
Lewis was formerly identified with bur- 
lesque companies in a similar .capacity. 

RAY GIRLS QUIT 

Ethel and Florence Ray closed with the 
"Midnight Maidens." April 7. Mazie Rog- 
ers and Irene Irving joined the show, 
April 9, at the Empire. Brooklyn. 

"SIGHT SEERS" HELP FUND 

The "Sight Peers" helped to collect near- 
ly $400 for the Actors' Fund during 
Miner's Bronx week. 



CRAIG ROUTE ENDS 

- Richard Craig and bis company closed 
their route last week at Kiles. Ohio. 



"FROLICS" HAVE BIG WEEK 

Minneapolis, April 7. — "The French 
Frolics" followed up their record weeks at 
the Englewood, Chicago, and Gayety, Mil- 
waukee, by playing to the. biggest week in 
the history of the Gayety, Minneapolis, 
with the exception of State Fair week. It 
was the first trip of the "Frolics" in the 
Northwest ; 



FORM NEW SISTER ACT 

Bessie Bohlman and Maudie Robinson, 
of the Ginger Girls, who were recently 
promoted from-the chorus to numbers and 
the handling of parts, have met with so 
much success that they have decided to 
invade vaudeville this summer with a 
sister act. 



GLADYS SEARS RE-SIGNED 

Gladys Scars has signed a contract with 
Charles Barton to appear again with his 
show next season. She will spend several 
weeks of the summer as a member of 
Bobby Morrow's stock company at the 
Trocadero, Philadelphia. 



GERARD MOVES HEADQUARTERS 

The Gerard Producing Co. has moved 
its offices to Rooms 901-902 Columbia 
Theatre Building. Barney Gerard is now 
looking up new people for his next sea- 
son's three shows 



PATTON MANAGES GAIETY 

Bon-iiU). April 0. — "Dick" Patton is 
now installed as manager of the Gaiety- 
He was succeeded by E. W. Chipman as 
manager of the "Twentieth Century 
Maids." 



HAZEL LANGLEY SIGNED 

Hazel Langlcy, of the Watson's Beef 
Trust company as been engaged as sou- 
brette for the Summer stock company, 
which opens at the Trocadero Theatre, 
Philadelphia, early in May. 

ROBLES' FRIENDS RESPOND 

A substantial sum has been received by 
the Committee, headed by 1. N. Weber, 
for assisting Charles Roblea, who waa sud- 
denly stricken blind through the use of • 
hotel towel. 



BURLESQUER SERIOUSLY BURNED 

Utica. N. Y.. Ap»il 3.— Babe Towing 
of the Behman Show, is at St. Luke's hos- 
pital here, suffering from burns received 
during a fire. There is little hope of her 



recovery. 



' ETTA COOPER MAKES DEBUT 

Bluck Cooper's Daughter Etta, while on 
a vacation last week, appeared in a per- 
formance of the "Sightseers" at the Em- 
pire. Brooklyn, giving a male impersona- 
tion. 



4PATTON GETS A PRESENT 

The- members of the Twentieth Century 
Maids on the eve of his departure for 
Buffalo presented Dick Patton with a huge 
cut glass bowl and a dozen glassesC 

FLAIG AND BEALL SIGNED 

Flaig and Beall. -sytli the "September 
Morning Glories" this season, have signed- 
up for the coming season with the same 
attraction. * 



STRAUSS AT THE HOWARD 

Fred Strauss will have charge of the 
business of the summer stock at the How- 
ard, Boston, for Strauss A Franklyn. 



"CINCER GIRLS" TO CLOSE 

Boston, Mass.. April 2. — "The Ginger- 
Girls" close for the season at the Howard 
Theatre here, week of April 21. 



BARTON'S FROLICS TO CLOSE 
Charles Barton's "Frolics of 1917" 

closes its season with the week of April, 

1C at the Gayety. Brooklyn. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



KEEP YOUR 



O rxj 



THESE SONGS 



Because it won't be long before youlf hear them sung, played and whistled from coast to coast and bor- 
der to border.- Each one is QUITE DIFFERENT. The only 'point of resemblance is they're all bound to be 



THE SPRING AND SUMMER HITS 



If these six songs were the only ones ever written, there wouldn't be room for one speck of disappointment. 

They absolutely fill the bill! 



ALL 
THE 



WILL 



JEALOUS OF ME 



ERNEST R. BALL'S latest, and one of the most beautiful melodies he ever wrote, with a lyric by AL. DUBIN that gets there and stays 
there. Orchestrations in 9 keys. G (d to d), Ab (eb to eb), A (e to e) , Bb (f to f ), C (g to g), Db <ab to ab), D (a to a), Eb (bb to bb), 
F (c to c). 



I've 
Got 



The Sweetest Girl in Maryland 



By WALTER DONALDSON 
A song bathed in Southern sunshine. Great chorus and an irresistible "patter" — all sorts of double versions. Orchestrations in 6 keys. 



v *,,. :i- ?.. ^"J 



'S A LONG, LONG TRAIL 



By STODDARD KING and ZO ELLIOTT. Big international hit, 'whose haunting melody has captivated two continents. A big favorite 
with real ballad singers. Orchestrations in 6 keys. Eb (bb to bb), F (c to c), G (d to d), Ab (eb to eb), Bb (f to f ), C (g to g). 



WHERE THE CHERRY 
BLOSSOMS FALL 



By J. KEIRN BRENNAN and WALTER DONALDSON 
A delightful Japanese novelty When you hear it, you'll say it's one of the prettiest songs ever written, and everybody will agree 
with you. Orchestrations in 3 keys F (c sharp to d), G (d sharp to e), A (e sharp to F sharp) 



TWAS 
ONLY 



By AL DUBIN, J. J. O'BRIEN and RENNIE CORMACK 
One of the brightest and best from the "House of Irish Hits." Already solidly rooted in the public's affections. 
Orchestrations in 8 keys- Bb (bb to c). C (c to d), Db (db to eb), D ( d to e), Eb (eb to f ), F (f to g), G (g to a), Ab (ab to bb). 



WHEN 



i 
i 



I 



By JACK YELLEN and JACK GLOGAU. A regular rollicking riot witka rag for a tune that gets you going till you can't stop. Another 

"Are You from Dixie" is what everybody says once they hear it — gnaat double. 

Orchestrations in 6 keys. Ab (b to c), Bb (c sharp to d), C (d sharp to e)* D (e sharp to f sharp), Eb (f sharp to g), F (g sharp to a). 



IW. Witmark & Sons Philadelphia 



BOSTON 



san francisco Chicago M . Witmark & Sons Philadelphia boston 

Pi.nt.tr, nullding Schitler Building Uptown Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Mgr. .. 1021 Che.tnut St. 218 Trtmont St. 

AL. BROWNE, Mgr. TOM QUICLEY, Mgr. 1562 Broadway, next to Palace Theatre ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. JACK LAHEY, Mgr. 



1021 CKestnut St. 



218 Tremont St. 



April 11, 1917 



THE - NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



totESLODY LJ1NB 



EXHIBITORS' LEAGUE 
OBJECTS TO SERVICE FEE 

Organization of Picture Theatre Proprie- 
tors Claim* Another Society la Try- 
ing to Impose Tax on its Buiineu 

The Motion Picture Exhibitors' League, 
an organization composed of the pro- 
prietors of theatres devoted to the showing 
of motion pictures, is the latest organiza- 
tion to complain against the act under 
which the Society of Authors, Composers 
and Publishers expect to collect a perform- 
ing rights fee for the public rendition of 
the copyrighted composition of its mem- 
bers, and is considering an action to test 
the act's legality. 

While the Exhibitors' League has taken 
no official action, a number of its mem- 
bers have stated that the matter is under 
serious discussion, and some decided move 
will be made within the next week or so. 

The motion picture trade papers have 
taken the matter up and designate the per- 
forming rights fee as a tax which the 
authors and composers have, devised as a 
means of collecting thousands of dollars a 
year from the motion picture theatre pro- 
prietors. 

According to one of the motion picture 
papers, a movement is under way to form 
a picture theatre combination owning and 
controlling all the musical compositions 
which will be featured in the theatres con- 
trolled by the members of the organization. 
Plans of this sort make good reading, 
bnt their formation and operating expense 
will cost far more than the small amount 
which the society exacts for the perform- 
, ing rights of the compositions of its mem- 
bers. 

At the time the matter was first brought 
to the attention of the courts the heads, of 
the Society of Authors and Composers 
knew that the first attempts to collect fees 
for the performance of music would be met 
with opposition on all sides as few in the 
entire country were aware of the rights 
given the composer by the copyright law. 

In spite of this the society went ahead 
with its plans, and when the first refusal 
to pay a fee was recorded, went Into the 
courts for redress, and fought the matter 
up to the TJ. S. Supreme Court, where 
its rights were established. 
I The collection of the performing rights 
fee is, therefore only dependent upon die 
method of collection -which the society may 
decide to adopt, as its legal standing as 
far as the right to collect has been passed 
upon by the highest court. '-• 



BRYAN IS HOMESICK 

Vincent Bryan, who for the past twelve 
months has been living in Los Angeles, is 
homesick, and although he is making a 
small fortune writing comedy scenarios 
wants to get back to Broadway. One of 
his recent letters, expressing his wish to 
be back among the song writers and pub- 
lishers was delivered to Ben Bornstein of 
the Harry Von Tilzer Co. last week with 
the following characteristic Bryan rhyme 
on the back of the envelope. 
Postman, be a friend of mine 
And slip this letter to Ben Bornstein. 
Give this note to Ben alone 
And slip a kiss to Meyer. Cohen. 
I'm 'way. out west, where the sun goes 

down. .,■>•!■ 
Gee! but this is a lonesome town! 
But, Postman I Postman! do your work; 
"This letter comes from' '■ 

.-' SAILOR BURKE. 

McKIN LEY PROF. OFFICES 
The McKinley Music Co. has leased pro- 
fessional quarters in the 46th Exchange 
Building, and as soon aa alterations are 
completed will begin an active campaign 
among the local singers. 

Up to the present time the McKinley 
company has confined its professional 
activities to Chicago, but with a catalogue 
containing so many popular numbers 
Eastern professional representation is 
practically imperative. 



SOLDIERS SING ON SINKING SHIP 

The story of the sinking of the Birken- 
head over half a century ago and the con- 
duct Of the British soldiers on board, who 
went down to their deaths singing and 
lined up on deck as if on parade, has be- 
come a . classic. A very similar incident 
happened recently with a happier sequel, 
however. It occurred almost in the same 
spot as as the Birkenhead disaster. This 
time it was the British transport Tyndar- 
cus, carrying to South Africa a battalion 
of the Middlesex Regiment. The ship 
struck a mine .the night of February 
last and immediately began settling by 
the bow. Her propellers were far out of 
the water. There was a strong sea run- 
ning and the ship seemed doomed. The 
soldiers were lined up on deck, the roll 
called, and every man responded. Then 
came the order to stand easy. At once 
the soldiers started to sing, just as their 
comrades had done fifty odd years be- 
fore under similar tragic circumstances. 
And the song they started singing was 
There's a Long, Long Trail — the march 
song with the haunting refrain that Eur- 
ope and America love so well. To quote 
the account in the London Daily Chron- 
icle: "Some one started 'The Long Trail,' 
and in a few seconds' the whole gathering 
from end to end of the ship had taken up 
the haunting refrain of the latest march- 
ing song." 

And so these brave souls kept it up. 
Happily, two rescue ships arrived in time 
to save every soul on board, but the 
spirit displayed was that of _ all true 
heroes facing apparently certain death. 
King George sent a special' message of ad- 
miration to them for worthily upholding 
"the splendid tradition of the Birkenhead, 
ever cherished in the annals of the Brit- 
ish army." 

"There's a Long, Long Trail" is the in- 
evitable song of the day. »It is a wonder- 
ful success everywhere and its publication 
by M. Witmark ft Sons is one of the best 
things they ever did. 

BROADWAY'S SEVEN SUCCESSES 
The Broadway Music. Corporation has 
seven successful songs in its catalogue at 
present, all competing for first place. So 
evenly balanced is their popularity that 
it ia impossible to predict their respective 
positions in the race at the end of the 
month. 

' The list includes "When ' the Sun Goes 
Down in Dixie," "The Cute Little Wig- 
glin' Dance," "Everybody's Jazzin' It," 
"Honor Thy Father, and Mother," "Eve 
Wasn't Modest," "The Honolulu Hick 
Boola Boo," and "I Wasn't Born to Be 
Lonesome." 



"SOMEWHERE IN DELAWARE" 

Will J. Harris and Harry I. Robinson 
have two songs with Jos. W. Stern ft Co. 
which are already well established among 
the leaders of the season. They are 
"Somewhere in Delaware," a clever 
"State" song, and "Good Morning. Glory." 
The "State song , has been pronounced . 
one of the best numbers of the kind 
heard in years. 

.BERLIN OFFERS A PRIZE 

Irving Berlin is offering a prize of $25 
-in gold for the best extra verse to his 
song "The Road That Leads to Love." 
There are no conditions to the contest, 
Mr. Berlin will personally examine all 
verses submitted, and the one which in 
his opinion best suits the song will receive 
the prise. 

MILLEGRAM SIGNS WALTONS 
Maurice and Florence Walton, the danc- 
ers, have signed a contract with the Carl 
Millegram Publishing Co., Inc., giving the 
firm exclusive rights to publish all their 
dance creations. They are dancing Silvio 
Hein's dainty little entr'acte "Bubbles,* 
which looks like a sensational hit. 



DORe LIKES MILLEGRAM SONG 

Robert Do re, the baritone, declares that 
"The Paradise of Your Dear Eyes," the 
new ballad of the Carl Millegram Pub- 
lishing Co., is a positive hit in his act, re- 
ceiving as much applause as the prologue 
from Pagliacci, which has been his best 
number. 



••' GILBERTS FLAG SONG 

Among the spores of new patriotic 
songs issued recently a number well 
worthy of mention is L. Wolfe Gilbert's 
. "Let. the Flag -Fly," a song clever as to 
lyric, catchy melody and suitable for all 
occasions. 



A SONGWRIT1NG RECORD 
•Jack" Glogau and "Jack" Yellen have 
established something of a record in song 
writing by in twelve days completing 
eight songs which covers practically the 
entire field of popular composition. The 
numbers include comedy, Irish, Italian, 
novelty ballad, high-class ballad, double 
number, and two novelties. Three of the 
new songs have been placed with pub- 
lishers, three are being reserved for pro- 
ductions and the remaining two are being 
held for the new season. 



A SONG OF THE MOMENT - 

Chappell & Co. an offering to profes- 
sional singers a new patriotic number en- 
titled "Well Never Let Our Old Flag 
Fall," which is attracting much attention. 
It is by Alfred E. MacNutt and M F. 
Kelly. , 

FEIST'S PATRIOTIC NUMBER 

Leo Feist is- exploiting a new patriotic 
song entitled "If I Had a Son for Each 
Star in Old Glory, Uncle Sam, I'd Give 
Them All to You," It J. E. Dempsey and 
Jos. A. Burke. The title tells its story. 



EMMA CARUS'S NEW SONG 

Emma Cams is featuring a new song 
from the Shapiro-Bernstein catalogue 
called "Rollins In His Little Rolling 
Chair," and the number looks like a big 
success. It is from the pens of MacDon- 
ald, Goodwin and Mohr. 



HARRY VON TILZER'S LEADERS 

The leading popular numbers in the 
Harry Von Tilzer catalogue are "On the 
South Sea Isle." "Somewhere in Dixie," 
"There's Someone More Lonesome Than 
Yon," "Just the Kind of a Girl" and "Love 
Wfll Find a Way." 



JOE ROSEY PLACES TWO 

Joe Rosey, who steals enough time from 
his jewelry store business to write a song 
now and then, has just placed two instru- 
mental numbers with J. W. Stern ft Co. 
entitled "Waltzing the Bride" and "Rag- 
ging the Waves." 

IS IT HUBBELL OR GOLDEN? 

"Billy" Jerome has a new song out called 
"I'm Looking for the Guy That Wrote 
Poor Butterfly," but it fails to reveal 
whether the man wanted is Hubbell or 
Golden. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



It would not disturb your mental cos- 
mos, would it, if you didn't know the 
French people call men like Al. G. Fields, 
John W. Vogel, etc., "Maitre des mene- 
triers"! (Masters of the minstrels.) 



Jimmie Kendis continues to get big 
results with very little dipping into the 
bank roll. "Come Out of the Kitchen 
Mary Ann" seems to be bringing home the 
bacon and kale. 



You. couldn't hit the side of a barn with 
one of those new high powered rifles, 
could youT But you're willing to try, 
aren't youT Of course you are! 

"I want to get 'Poor Butterfly* with 
obligarters," said the young lady at the 
counter. "Oh, does she wear them, tool" 
asked the new music clerk. 

BUI McKenna says that dedication In 
here was all wrong. It should have been: 
"To My Favorite Irish Friend. My 
Father." K. O., Bill. 

Where are those acts that used to fill 
glasses partly with water, and then make 
sweet music my- rubbing their hands on 
the rims? 



SANTLEY A NORTON'S FEATURE 

S ant ley and Norton, one of- the -cleverest 
singing teams in vaudeville, are scoring 
a great success with the new Leo Feist 
song "I Called You My Sweetheart." 

"JACK" ROBBINS WITH FORSTER 

"Jack" Robbins, for the past six months 
with the Karczag Publishing Co., is now 
connected with the professional depart- 
ment of Forster Music Publishing Co. ' 

. .MAURICE ADLER HERE 
Maurice Adler, of the Forster Music 
Co. of. Chicago, is in New York pushing 
"Oh. Johnny! Oh, Johnny, Oh!" 

ARTHUR A. PENN'S NEW BALLAD 
Arthur A. Pcnn only writes a song every 
now and then, but when he does, if s some- 
thing-worth while. Every prima donna 
has sung his famous "CarisBima," and 
every singer who appreciates a real good 
song will sing his latest high-class ballad, 
"The Magic of Your Eyes." This is a 
beautiful number, viewed from any stand- 
point, and Mr. Penn has already received 
scores of letters of appreciation from 
prominent artists all over the country in 
reference to its conspicuous merits as a 
song that appeals irresistably to singers 
and audiences alike. "The Magic of Your 
Eyes" is published by M. Witmark ft Sons 
and the indications are that it will prove 
one of the most substantial and long- 
lived successes in their catalog. 



Not that yon care the mast bii about 
it, but it helps to fill space, and that is 
that the > kettle drum used' to be called 
"Anakara." - ." : ;-.:V l u> ; . . 

George ICoxey takes time, off from his 
down-town office and writes mtyujtJice pol- 
icies.'' for the rich song writers. <ggt 

George Offermann, who has the cutest 
lisp in or out .of cabaret, is the proud 

father of a baritone singer. 

Publishers owing royalties to German 
and Austrian composers can hold on to 
them a while longer. 

There's a new machine that you can use 
to cut your own hair. Bet it's a good 
trick if you can do it. 

These are times when you think some- 
thing, think it all to yourself. And then 
very quietly, 

The ordinary singer gets all puffed up 
Then you tell him it's a high class song. 

Mack Stark ia the able business man- 
ager of the Kalmar-Puck- Abrahams Co. 



Jiffy Jell is a new desert. It wabbles 

like an Hawaiian song- 
Fox steps and One troth seen to be as 

popular as ever. 

Well, it's here. Are you ready T And 
willing? 

Actions speak louder than lyrics. 



Where are the peace songsT 
Gonna do your bit! 



38 THE MEW YORK CLIPPER April iu J917 





PRO D U C ER 

IN ASSOCIATION WITH 



PHYSIOC & STORY, Inc. 

SUITE 810 FITZGERALD BLDG., 1482 BROADWAY 

Telephone Bryant 4835 

Is Prepared to Place and Cast Artists for Productions, Vaudeville, Revues and Pictures 

FRIENDS OLD AND NEW INVITED 



IIM THE DISTANT FUTURE 



WHEN SHADOWS TALL 

(By FROST AND KEITHLEY) 

Will be classed as the greatest ballad of its year — and many years that shall have followed. It stands alone among modern 
high-class numbers, because Grand Opera singers claimed it as their own and interpolated it in operas that 

had been heard for centuries with unchanged scores. 

IVfcKlnley IVIuslc Co., Cohan's Grand Opera House Bldg M Chicago 



MORAN m WHEELER 

In "Remember Mickey?" 

Author Lew Brown. N. V. A. Direction Harry A. Shoa 



HUGH HERBERT 

Author of "Discontent," "Prosperity," "Sons of Abraham" and "Imagination," offers the season's success 

"TMEF»F?EDIOTIOrJ" 

Orpheum Circuit in July— United Time Now 
N. V. A. DIRECTION ALF. T. WILTON 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



.19 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page 9) 



LEAVITT & LOCKWOOD THE WANING HONEYMOON I DKCTOW 



Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 

Style — Singing and talking. 

Time— JVeZi e minutes. 

Setting— /o one. 

Abe Leavitt, having discarded burlesque 
for a while, is appearing with Bath 
Lockwood, also a former burlesqner, In. a 
new and novel offering, the composition 
and assemblage of which must be credited 
to Abe, with our compliments. The rea- 
son for the latter is that he was far- 
sighted enough to see that it is useless 
to try and put over a torn, the material 
of which has its origin in burlesque, for 
there is nothing in the new and novel 
-bits" he offers to suggest such a heritage. 
The execution of all the business is done 
in a brisk and clever manner and, when 
shaped up, will make the torn an ac- 
ceptable one for better time. 

It might be suggested, however, that 
even though he may at times be forced 
to perform at a supper show, that he cut 
ont "kidding" the audience via the piano 
player. Doing so had a great deal to do 
with the limited reception accorded the 
act at this house. 

Leavitt is a clever comedian, and no 
matter to what sort of audience he may 
work his material will go over without 
any .of his impromtu remarks. Miss 
Lockwood is the type of ingenue that can 
always do her share both in talk and 
song, no matter how she may be placed. 
With the edges trimmed a bit, the act 
should be a most welcome addition to the 
present lot of two-a-day offerings. 

ALU. 



MERKET & BONDHILL 

Theatre — Loeto't Orpheum. 
Style— M an-and-girl. 
Time— Sixteen minutes. 
Setting — One. 

This is a classy act of its kind. 
The man has a wishing ring and with 
it he wishes for the girl of his dreams. 
Much to his surprise she really appears. 
After some entertaining talk, they sing 
a tuneful number, followed by a dance 
which is well done. There is then some 
more talk about the wishing ring and the 
girl wishes she could become an actress 
and appear on the stage. The man then 
points out the audience to her and shows 
her that her wish has been gratified. 

While she makes a change of costume 
he sings a novelty song about things that 
can't be done. The verse about the 
pajamas has no place in an act otherwise 
the essence of refinement. 

The girl then re-enters and sings a 
cute "kid" song. 

Later, the man reappears in a close- 
fitting suit which brings out his "One 
points" and causes many laughs. 

A novelty song which they both sing 
closes the act. H. G. 



MELVILLE & RULE 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 

Style — Singing ana talking. 

Tiine — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

The "slangy girl" and the "English 
chappy" are the characters portrayed 
by Mary Melville and George Rule in 
a nonsensical but amusing conglomera- 
tion of chatter and song, with Miss Mel- 
ville supplying ' the comedy and Rule 
acting as the "feeder." The dialogue 
is slangy throughout. Miss Melville 
using her partner as the subject for 
most of the humorous lines. 

Her single song about a stenographer 
is altogether too suggestive in nature, 
bordering on the extreme limit of pro- 
priety. It might be well to discard 
this number, for, as the act is now 
constituted, it is not of sufficient merit 
to play the two-a-day houses, and the 
one suggestive song would make it un- 
desirable in the neighborhood theatres. 
The other numbers used by the couple 
are pleasing, and the dance used for the 
finish is neatly executed- But, as the 
turn is at present constructed, it is un- 
likely that it will qualify for the two- 
a-day nouses. .* . T*. 



Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

"The Waning Honeymoon" concerns a 
love spat of a pair of newlyweds, who 
have been married for the long time of 
twelve hours. For some reason the girl 
is rather quarrelsome on the first day 
of her marriage, and her husband finds 
it a Herculean task to even extract a 
kiss from her. 

When she finds that he has lost a 
novel entitled "The Unhappy Honey- 
moon," which she was reading, her 
anger increases. She wonders how the 
story ended. 

A telegram comes for her husband. 
He reads it and tells her that the police 
are on his trail because, to give her a 
happy honeymoon, he has absconded 
with funds from the bank where he is 
employed. As a climax, be shoots him- 
self, and then, when she is frantic, he 
comes to life again, telling her he has 
been fooling her to illustrate to her how 
the lost novel ended. 

The playlet has little to recommend 
it. -Its lines are weak and poorly ren- 
dered. The surprise ending saves it 
from a. miserable death, but a good 
ending is not enough to atone for the 
trash that preceded it and poor acting 
throughout. H. G. 



WILL ARCHIE & CO. 

Theatre — Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — Special, in one. 

This diminutive comedian, assisted by 
a sweet and pleasant young girl, pre- 
sents a novel and entertaining comedy 
skit, entitled "Young Love." Archie, 
as a boy carrying golf bags, becomes 
smitten with the daughter of a rich 
man. He is on the links with her and 
professes his love. 

She, however, tells him that he must 
have at least $500 if he desires to marry 
her. During this dialogue, Archie does 
a bit of comedy business by breaking 
up half a dozen golf sticks. 

Then a man appears who tells Archie 
that a locket has been lost and that 
a reward will be offered. Archie, hav- 
ing an old locket, sells it to him for 
enough money to enable him to get a 
new suit of clothes. The locket, of 
course, is spurious and the man returns 
to find Archie gone. 

Upon the hitter's return he finds the 
real locket and tells the girl about it. 
She informs him that a reward of $500 
has been offered for its return by her 
mother. This, of course, enables the 
couple to think of matrimony. 

There are several songs in the offer- 
ing, in addition to the dialogue, and 
when the turn is whipped into shape it 
win be a likely feature turn for the 
. neighborhood houses. A. D. 



ROSTOCK'S NEW LION 
TAMER 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 

Style — - Comedy talking act. 

Time— Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — One and full stage. 

Claude Bostock presents Joe Fields 
and Will Halliday in this, a burlesque 
version of the "trials and tribulations" 
of a circus owner. 

The material is altogether too crude 
for a man of Fields's ability as a co- 
median. The lines are practically ''re- 
vamped* burlesque bits, most of them 
having been used by Fields in his bur- 
lesque career. As a matter of fact, this 
type of act' hardly possesses sufficient 
quality for Fields to appear in. There 
is plenty of comedy and humor in the 
offering, but it is not of the wholesome 
and appealing variety, especially as far 
as two-a-day audiences are concerned. 

A. U. 



BROADWAY'S 



HIT 

OlftKTOW 



Of" ALL DIXtfSS.ONGS 



"WHEH THI SUM GOES DOWN IN DIXIE" 



It- tlVi-i tVi- i. 



\1 I'.I'-.K I \ I >N 



(.HAS. M.tARKON 



"THE 60TE LITTLE WI6GUH' DAHCE" 



|>.i^s it l.y. -Y, 



K.il IV<kl AMI.K 



LAY I ON 



"EVERYBODY'S JAZZIH' IT" 



Y.,u".ll pVi tin- f.-v<-i-. :ti 



THIS IS IT 



'whrn \ou 



"HONOR THY FATHER AND MOTHER" 



\rrli -h.ilt.tti in yrark. T lie. sjirij*; you've hV„f 
<l ALKX (.F.RI5F1R 



n I'MiUjur- (* 



'EVE WASN'T MODEST 2£ ATE THAT APPLE" 1 

(WE'LL HAVE TO PASS THE APPLES AGAIN) 



'jXy ^.r-nsiitioci of the y«?Arl IVs ItUr eVttim; n><>ut*v from K..r 

■.vorJi Bv AU5KRY VON HLZKR and CHA.S .\KCAKRON 



THE HONOLULU HICKI BOOLA BOO" 




l.v tin- writers of "Oh. How She ■ 
Tll./FR. -CM AS: MtCAKKO.N ..i,a 



THIS IS IT: 
:i Y.,,U; H.<«:!>i 



Another BULL'S; K 



"I WASN'T BORN TO BE LONESOME" 



A typii.-tl Alf/ort V.,,> T.I;.;r 
Youf Litllr B.il.y." Crc.t 

CHAS. McCARRON 



MMVotly jonei Thr !.<-j.t ',in**>. hi* "O'.riiv .ini! KJ)*S 
Jotililr v,-.--i,.... ft,Vr.li-l,v,!.!.\\. IliiOWN:",,,,! 



HITS YOU ALL KNOW ABOUT 

DOWN WHERE, THE SWANEE RIVER FLOWS" 
•PUT ON YOUR SLIPPERS AND FILL UP YOUR PIPE" 
OH. HOW; SHE : COULD YACKI HACK!" 
DOWN IN HONKY TONKY TOWN" 



BROADWAY MUSIC CORPORATION 

WILL VON TILZER, President 

US W. 45th SL New York City 1 45 It. Clark St, Chicago, III. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11,1917 



STARS 

THAT SHINE 

WITH 




MAY WIRTH - 

and WIRTH FAMILY 



ABSOLUTELY THE 
GREATEST RIDER 



Every Newspaper Concedes Her Supremacy KstSictiy'tK'bigflL'Se iHk g ALni'd 

* r l r •■ -* *- -«- — •• thrilling." 



of the show.*' 



The Original Novelty Act 

(Not to bo c onfajo d with oUmt» of 
similar wondinf name*) 

FRANK FRED GERTRUDE 

The Reckliess Trio 

Head-Balancing 
Extraordinary 



THE LE MONTS 

SPEED MECHANICS 

An Extraordinary Exhibition of Auto-Assembling Under 

Difficulties 



The Only Contor- 
tionist With The 
Ringling Show 

SCHUBERT 

Gorgeous, spectacular 
special scenery and set- 
ting in Vaudeville. 



AUSTRALIAN 

WOODCHOPPERS 

(Jackson & McLaren) 

THE ONE AND ONLY 

Direction Henry Ber- 
linghoff — Columbia 
Theatre Bldg., N. Y, 



Cbc Riding Lloyds 

in their new sensation 

Xbe Cossacks 

fiovtl Unique and Original 



NOW PLAYING AT 



April li. 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 




\N OPEN LETTER FROM 



Hy Friends: 

I was going to say that I just came back from the Orpheum Circuit and am again featured with Ringling 
Jros/ Circus. But what's the use? I've said the same thing in my ads. so often that I feel you must be getting 
ired of hearing it— just as tired as I am of saying it. I was one of the show's biggest features nine years ago — 
jid haven't improved any. If I could do an aerial act, riding, juggling or almost anything on the sensational 
>rder , you'd hear me do some tall bragging. But I've got nothing to say — not even something comical — be- 
ause I now put all my comedy in my act. 

(Signed) MIJARES. 




STARS 

THAT SHINE 

WITH 



BOBKER BEN ALI 

and His Fourteen Peerless Whirlwind Desert Athletes 

Tribesmen Who Create Human Pyramids, 
Exhibiting Sturdy Manhood at Its Best 



HILLARY 
LONG 

Sensational 

Head-Balancer 



The Rudl Bellong Trio 

Sensational Cycle Equilib ris- 
tic Act, Including Looping 
the Loop on a Human ped- 
estal—executed by a lady. 



The Wilson- 
Aubrey Trio 

COMEDY WREST- 

LING AND TRIPLE 

BAR ACT 



The Original 




ornia 
OrangePackers 

After a tremendously 

successful European 

tour. 



EOLISEUM, CHICAGO 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



"Maggie Taylor— - Waitress" 

Direction Lewi. & Cordon 



VAUDEVILLE FEATURE ACTS 



FRANK STANLEY 



IN 



"Where's The 



>7 



Representative 
BERT GOLDBERG 



DIRECT FROM 
THE NUT FACTORY 




Diractioa HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 
U. & O.— BIG TIME 



Stuart Barnes 



Dinetlo. J AS . E. PLUNKETT 



MARY FORREST 



With ADELE BLOOD AND CO. 



EMMA STEPHENS 

BOOKED SOLID DIRECTION HARRY FITZGERALD 



DAINTY MARIE 

VENUS OF THE AIR 

Wtahn to B. Known la Futur. Undar Hnr Own Nam* 

(DAINTY) MARIE MEEKER 

DIRECTION PAT CASEY 



A Different Comedy Act 



ALLEN AND MORTON 

Fool, Fiddle and Voice In Fun and Folly 



WORKING FOR U. B. O. 



OIR. CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



Dainty Dancing Duo 

DIRECTION GENE HUGHES. INC, AND JO. PAIGE SMITH 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

M ME DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER & BIERBAUER 



MAZIE KING 



In Her Own Dance Creations 



Direction MAX HART 



JOE TOWLE 



MRS. THOS. WHIFFEN 6 CO. 

AND PEGGY DALE WHIFFEN 

PLAYING U. B. O. TIM E 



In "The Golden Night 



NOLAN and NOLAN 

JESTING JUGGLERS 

Direction NORMAN JEFFRIES 



THE READES 

Slack Wire Juggling Novelty 

Direction RAY HODGDON 



THE CLEANEST ACT ON THE BILL 



LEO FITZGERALD, ViairrflU Braknr 



ARTHUR HAVEL &CO.-PLAYMATES 

By WILL M. CRESSY 

DIRECTION JAMES E. PLUNKETT 



ED. P. REYNARD Pmaats 
MLLE. 

Bl ANCA 

In • SnfiM «l DriM He 

Daac* Pomu. 



Ml J .P., BIANCA PraMBts 

REYNARD 

Th s Ven trflocjttial Comadian, 
to "BEFORE THE COURT - 



MARGARET YOUNG 



DIRECTION MAX HART 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS. 



Will consider offers for next season. 
Burlesque or production. Two good 
all around utility men. -:- -:- 



.Apr. t; lL..l917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



.& 



Vaudeville Review 



from Pan Q 



PROCTOR'S 125th STREET 

Out Half) 

The audience at this house was unusually 
large, especially for Holy Week, the evi- 
dent reason being the good quality of the 
show presented by Manager Robert Genet. 

The Yaltos, modern ballroom dancers, 
were in the opening spot. As a rule, it 
. is very difficult for the opening act to make 
any headway in this house, but the audi- 
ence took the routine and signified its gen- 
eral approbation at the conclusion of the 
act. 

Will Archie & Co., in "Young Love," 
were 'in tbe second spot. Little Will has a 
host of admirers in Harlem, and they 
seemed to take very kindly to his offering. 

Roy and Arthur, with their comedy jug- 
gling turn, supplied unusual humor, espe- 
cially with the plate breaking bits. The 
use of the "woman plant" in the box might 
be eliminated as it tends to scare the 
patrons sitting near when the paper plates 
are hurled about. 

Billie Reeves & Co. presented the comedy 
sketch, "Night Out." The business 
throughout this turn is wholesome and 
amusing, especially the pantomimic nurs- 
ing of the baby by Reeves. 

The Valarie Sisters offered a repertoire 
of character songs and dances. The ma- 
terial the girls use is good, but the work 
of the comedienne should not be allowed 
to become too brusque. She is clever, but 
is liable at times to make that mistake. It 
is rather bard for a woman, to execute 
comedy business, but when she does sue 
should limit her endeavors. 

Marie and Dan Solamini offered a neat 
and -classical musical recital, with the 
youth at the piano and Marie playing the 
violin. The girl's rendition of "The Ro- 
sary" was an opportune offering, stopping 
the show. Their final number was a pop- 
ular medley. The turn was the hit of tbe 
show. 

The Kane Bros., equilibrists, closed tbe 
show with their feats of balancing and 
posing. A. U. 



EIGHTY-FIRST STREET . 

(UitHtll) 

After the travelogue and semi-weekly 
pictures, the vaudeville show was opened 
by Raul and Mae Nolan with their clever 
juegling act. The brunt of the hard work 
falls on the man, but the girl's sweet 
charm enhances the act's value. All of 
the juggling is done skillfully, and enough 
comedy is injected into the act to make 
it not only entertaining but amusing as 
well. The team works fast and found no 
difficulty at Thursday's matinee in get- 
ting it over big. 

Naninoa, an Hawaiian steel guitar 
player, occupied the second spot and ren- 
dered some enjoyable numbers. The turn 
will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Tom Edwards, assisted by Alice Mel- 
ville, scored heavily with his ventriloquist 
act. He is very clqver in bis line of work, 
but should avoid giving his American 
newsboy dummy a cockney English dia- 
lect. The way he rocks the baby to sleep 
at the end of the act and his ventrilo- 
quistic impersonation of a little infant are 
highly amusing. 

The girl in the act has a double singing 
voice which is very striking, but she over- 
does her talent, singing practically four 
songs. If she would use the song with 
the Chaplin figure as her first number 
and render some other chorus for an en- 
core, that would be enough of her singing 
to satisfy the audience. 

J. Walter Davidson, director of the or- 
chestra, rendered a. violin solo after inter- 
mission. The solo was as excellent as 
anything on the bill. 

Moon and Morris followed a Triangle 
feature picture. Their grotesque opening 
dance, in which they work so perfectly 
together, received a big hand. Their 
"Bertie and Archie" song pleased. The 
dance that they use as a closer was neatly 
done and took the team off in great shape. 

"The Dream Garden," closing the vaude- 
ville bill, will receive a review under New 
Acta - H. G. 




Van Sisters 



Dainty vocal and instrumental 
artists, featuring Christie Van, the 
greatest living girl cometist. 



HEADLINE ACTS 



i 



ROBERTS 



CLINTON 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JAS. B. 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



APPOINTED BY UNCLE SAM 



TOM 



JACK 



CONROY O'DONNELL 

PARCEL POSTVfAN 

D«l!verfB» Bundles el Joy and Packages el Laufbtar far tit U. B. O. 

Direction of TREAT MATHEWS Idee sad Material Copyrighted 



HARRY 



DOROTHY 



FABER -*> TAYLOR 



In "GOING NORTH" 



U. B. O. 



W. V. M. A. 



KmsSDiamondS. 



) mi i -40 see eeeUa »«o<j 
vWtt 





Tft I CX — Privil«e© of operettas merry -co-roand 
■ *» ■"•*- ■ In Greenville Schuotion Park. Boule- 
vard. Seavlew and Gates Area., Jersey City, N. J. 
Picnics about every day la season. Many cbnrcta 

picnics. Addreaa The Proprietor. Wat. 

BRTTSTEB. 



BOB'S MOTOR EXPRESS 

NEW YORK HARLEM BROOKLYN 

Htorage for Trnnkx Deference. All Headllners 

IS West 4itB St.. New York 
(Bet. B'vray and 6th Are.) Fbone Bryant 4388 

Wanted-Lady Pianist 

who ia also violinist or redder to join lady 
and gentleman in concert work. Address 
HERBERT DAVIS. ' 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



RUTH and BOB 



The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYNN. REPRESENTATIVE 



MARYL.IV1AXF1ELD 



Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



LINTON and WATSON 

Comedy Talk In i Act, Entitled 

"Sl-fce Auto Know" 

FRANKIE FAY 

Direction PAUL DURAND 



JOSEPHINE LENHART 



The Diminutive Songster 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



MORIARITY SISTERS 



ALICE 

DRESDI N DOLI_= OF VAI DF.VILLE 



MOLLY 
Direction IRVING SHANNON 



MARINO d~2 RICH 

ITALIAN PIANO MOVERS IN VAUDEVILLE 

THE HENNINGS 

Refined Comedy Novelty Offering 

DIRECTION J. P. HARRIS 



BILLY GLASON 



Novelty "JUST SONGS'' Character 



DIRECTION A. J. HORWITZ 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 




VAUDEVILLE HEADLINE ACTS 






LA BELLE CARMEN TRIO 

The Best Novelty of the Season 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



"SUM" 



CORYL 



GRINDELL » ESTHER 

booked sous in pOnnv EccaNTucrrus direction samurl baerwitz 



BARRY, NELSON & BARRY 

Entertainers De Luxe 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction, Jo Paige Smith 



BILLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Novelty Banjo Act Now at the Fulton 

Playing Loaw Time Direction Mark Lery 



Ann Dare 



In Vaudeville 



DIRECTION CHA3. FITZPATRJCK 



HUGE AS THE ALPS IN CLASS 

THE JIMMIE SHEA TRIO 

Earla Riclurd Harry Donnelly 

Direction, Lee P. MnckeafuM 



Vlvif 



Lawrence, Daly and Lawrence 

COMEDY-^SINGING AND DANCING ACT 

EN VAUDEVILLE ADDRESS— CLIPPER 



AL. TUCKER 

TRICK VIOLINIST 

The Boy With the White Violin 

DIRECTION PETE MACK 



ANNA MAE COONEY 

AND 

DELLA COONEY 



ALWAYS WORKING 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY «*-."**■* 

■^■^ ^"^^ * V ^™ ^™ ^* BY TOMMY CRAY 



Ray Lynch 



FOR YOUR OWN INTEREST 



Arthur Clay 



FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 



Fred Slater 



A BIG SURPRISE 



Lew Price 



.RNEST 



MURIEL. 



WATTS and RINGGOLD 

GREATEST COLORED COMEDY ACT OF THE AGE 

Direction LEW LESLIE 




VERCE & VERCI 



20th Century Elopement 



Direction ROSE * CURTIS 



AGENTS. LOOK US OVER 



BOSAN and GRANGER 



Sons of Ham 



SINGING. DANCING. MUSIC 
AND COMEDY, IN VAUDEVILLE 



DAVID G. FISCHER & CO. ^gJISts 

A Chester .from the Pathos of Ignorance 



IRVING AND WARD 



The Button Busters 



DIRECTION BERNARD BURKE 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY & LEWIN 



IN A 

School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL I ELSA MOST 



With MENLO MOORE 



W. V. M. A. 



U. B. O. 



SAM 



I 



LAURA 



A \A/AL.K 



A Leuon in Dandns— Norman Jafferiu 



THE 



— In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 

MARTIANS DREAMOFMARS " 



Special Scenery. Everything OrffiaaL 



ALL, GIRLS 



Darling Saxophone Four 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



ORIGINAL 

THREE MELVIN BROS. 

Act of It, KM 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

Good Friday was in no way a Imr (•• 
Kood business at this theatre, for Manage' 
Harry Swift bad a big time 'show for tliu 
entertainment -of bin patrons and, as a 
result, played to standing Toom that eve- 
ning. 

The opening turn waa Gallando, the clay 
modeller. Hia impresaioas were all fash- 
ioned after people ..of the- hour and, as a 
result, the act was well received. 

The Three Tivoli Girls offered a novelty 
singing turn in the second spot 

Valentiune and Bell, In their comedy bi- 
cycle torn, came close to topping the show 
in the next position. The couple perform 
several difficult feats which received just 
approbation from t lie audience. 

The Leach Sisters presented a classical 
singing offering. Both have splendid voices 
and a. most entertaining repertoire, that is 
capably han't .ed. 

Hugh H< i bert & Co., presented the dra- 
matic aketcn, "Prediction." The story ia 
one of human interest, constructed in a 
most capable manner, and holds suspense 
throughout. It wa« a timely holiday offer- 
ing, that was greatly appreciated by the 
opera bouse clientele. 

Gertrude Barnes offered a novelty reper- 
toire of character gongs. Miss Barnes haa 
exclusive material, which ia well presented. 
Her "Temptation" and "Joan of Arc," 
nainbers are particularly appealing. Much 
of the good impression created by these 
numbers might be credited to the manner 
in which they are costumed. 

"Memories," is . a pretty singing akit 
offered by a quartet of capable male har- 
monists. Thia quartet, despite the. fact 
that it followed ' several other singing tarns, 
received a big reception. Their song 
routine is such that it will always appeal 
to the patrons of the neighborhood 
theatres. 

(Hark and Verdi were back among, old 
friends.* These delineators of "Italian" 
character are big favorites in Harlem and, 
consequently, bad a most difficult time in 
leaving tbe stage at the finish of their 
turn, as the audience was clamoring for 
more of their comedy and aong. 

Joe Wood's "Dream Surprise Party," a 
miniature r/iuslcal comedy, was in the 
closing spot ' ■ A. TJ. 



RIVIERA , 

(Last Half.) ... . 

The show was opened by Celllna's Circus. 
The collies, monkeys and ponies,' compris- 
ing the circus, do some good work and 
form an .acceptable opening *ct- despite the; 
fact thai the .audience : greeted' the turn 
coldly at Thursday's matinee. 

George P. Hall, In the. second. .spot, be- 
gan by telling stories, continued with sing- 
ing, and ended with reciting. Hia stories, 
although supposed to be funny, did not get 
much of a laugh. His song is an old 

ene that many monologista have naed 'be- 
fore him until it haa lost its punch. 
Despite this fact, however, he sings two 
verses. His descriptive ballad ia also well 
done; although, if memory serves, thia 
number was in "The Spring Maid" sev- 
eral years ago. A recitation called "Tbe 
Whitest Man I Know" did not get over 
as well as the one that followed it, Bobert 
W. Service's "The Man from Eldorado." 
Both recitations are rendered at break-neck 
speed, and would gain effect by a slower 
and more natural rendition. 

Harriet Marlotte ft Company will re- 
ceive a review nnder New Acts. 

Following a Hearst-Pathe News Pic- 
torial and a Mutt and Jeff cartoon, Ralph 
Connor and company appeared. Thia ia 
a ventriloquist act, and, all in all, ia a 
good one of its kind. However, it rather 
cheapens patriotism to hear a dummy sing 
a patriotic number and to see thia same 
dummy haul np tbe American flag. 

Halley and Noble entertain with their 
airship talk. His song about "getting a 
medal for that" la sung well. The step- 
ping at the end of the turn brings tbe act 
to a 'neat close. 

The Ohlcagny Troupe, closing the show, 
was perhaps the best act on the bill. These 
nine Arabs work fast and furious, and", 
although their work is not startlingly orig- 
inal, it is done adeptly and brings the 
show to a noisy and exciting finish. H. G. 



THE TWO STARS 

ROCKWELL 

AND 

WOOD 

LATE OF ' 

The Milky Way 

NOW 

Keith's, Boston 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 

ANDY " 

WILLIAMS 

Bits from Songland 

Grrenpolnt, Brooklyn— Firit Half 
23rd St. Theatre Last llili 

Direction NORMAN JEFFERIE3 



f 



THE 




Pyrotechnical Novelty 

Direction AIT. T. WUtoa ' 



SLAYMANAU 

•t Producer of is 

ORIEnTAL NOVELTIES 

m ith Ave, Nsw Vera 

Phone Bryant 8950 




DOLLY CONNOLLY 



Dad's Theatrical Hotel 

PHILADELPHIA 



[ 



HEADLINE ACTS 



J 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANK 



RITA 



McNELLIS and REYOS 

In 'The Waning Honeymoon" 

BY FRED J. SEAMAN— A COMEDY SKETCH CLASSIC 



RUSSELL'S DANCING MODELS 

In a Scenic Dancing Novelty 



Baahei Solid 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

TTIVIIVIOINJS and EDDY 

BACK IN TOWN 

Refined Singing, Violin and Piano 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



WILLIAM 



EDNA 



EDMUNDS **-"—«— — LEEDOM 
GOING TO THE WEDDING 



ALWAYS WORKING. I waadsr war? 



Dtrsctisa MAX CORDON 



ABSLAM SHARIFF 



«'COXEr§ ARMY'* 

DIRECTION MARK MONROE 



Buhla Pearl 

A «arfl in »pot am anqj SHU 

Souring Cpiw ««rruH U Irrrf ton aRark S«q| 



lVlabel Harper 

The Funbeam of Vaudeville ELSIE WEBER at the Piaa* 



JOHNNY 

les 

from ska South. 



CORA 

DIRECTION SAM SHANNON 



ROBERTS, STUART and ROBERTS 

FROLICS OF 1016-17 



BOOKED 30LID-LOEW CIRCUIT 



REP. SAM BAERWTYZ 



JACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EUGENE EMMETT & CO. 

In ill* Rmrml Musical Comedy, TOWN HALL FOLLIES" 

RAYMOND FRAZIER. Principal 



EMILIE SISTERS 



DIRECTION 
LEW COLDER 



ETHEL MAE BARKER 

"KUBEXDC IN PETTICOATS" 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 






VAUDEVILLE HEADLINE ACTS 



BETTY FIELDS 



Booked Solid 



Dir^tJo. LOU EDLEMAN 



IRVING BLACKMAN 



MURRAY WESTON 



GEORGIA COMEDY FOUR 

DIRECTION JACK FLYNN 

riiiiifcwl Solid U. B. O. Tim. 

HARRY SINGER CARL BERNARD 



THE THREE ROZELLAS 

A Classy Musical Oddity 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction ARTHUR HORWTTZ 



A BREEZE FROM THE PLAINS 

NEBRASKA BILL & CO. 



WESTERN NOVELTY ACT 

D) VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN 



JOHNNY 



MARTIN and ELLIOTT 

"THOSE FASHION PLATE DANCING BOYS" 

Direction MARK LEVY 



DAINTY QUEEN OF SENSATIONAL RHYTHMIC GRACE 

LA PETITE MERCEDES 

A GORGEOUS DISPLAY OF NOVEL RICHNESS 

i ARTHUR J. HORWTTZ 



Thomas & Henderson 

The Black Steppers 

WATCH THEM IN VAUDEVILLE 



The Boy Who Came Back 

Id • New Act by Alien Spencer Tennoy 
ASK MY AGENT 



ALICE FARRELL 

In Vaudeville 

SINGING DANCING VIOLINISTS 






THREE SYNCOPATORS 



SMITH 



LANG 
Direction GLADYS BROWN 



NOMOLI 



FREDERICK H. SPEARE AND CO. 

Offer toe Novel Comedy Sketch Hit, 



66 



NOW HEADLINING LOEW CIRCUIT 



99 



REPRESENTATIVE LOUIS WESLEY 



JOHNNY SINGER 



AND 



DANCING DOLLS 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



AARON KESSLER. REPRESENTATIVE 



JAS. E. 



ED. F. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



•JIM 



C. 



COVENEY & WOODROW 



The Precedents of Vaudeville 




ANDERSON & EVANS 

PRESENTING THEIR NEW ACT 



«* 



»» 



PILOT— L KAUFFMAN 



KATHRYN Ml LEY 

"Nature's Own Comedienne" 
In Vaudeville 



Three lMopiie Sisters 



Singing, Dancing, Novelty 



New Act 



la Vaudeville 



FLORENCE TIMPONI 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



LIL 

In 5 Feet of Sweetness and a Violin 



PLAYING VAUDEVILLE 



THE THREE ARLEYS 



DAMNUM & BAILEY CIRCUS 



Direction— PAUL DURAND 



O'BRIEN & KING 

(Formerly O'Brien A Emaaer) 

In THE NEW PIANO PLAYER 



JACK WALTERS & CLIFF SISTERS 

. WORKING . 

Dan Dix &. Virgil 

WITH STAMPEDE RIDERS 



EDDIE 



AND 



MONKEY SHINES — IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction of MAX LANDAU 



ED E. and BIRDIE CONRAD 

In a Vaudeville CLassJque by ED L CONRAD 
Direction Lewis A Gordon 

boi-KELLEY & CATLII\I-€i:o 

THOSE NATURAL COMEDIANS 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



CIij»j»e* 





la artier to awsld wlilitw and to Insure tie y r uuil i l dalhrafT af th 
Ik tills llat, a POSTAL CARD mint be Mat ™jua.tia» u to forward your Uttar. It moat 
b. aitnad with your full nam. and lb* JHwpi to which tha letter fa to be Mat. and tba 
■«— «f bnatnsss followed by tha stailr* jpJMJ ba "— ■ ■*« - ' 

Please tn—Mwi tha data (ar numbtr) af tha CUPPER in which tha Wttara seat tor 



Altaic. Max 
Anderson, Or* 
Hilltop, Ju. 
Brstehl. Sun 
Belmort. Lionel 
Burt. C. D. 
Bojte. Jack 
Bertelserj, A. 
Banas. D. 
Burton, Cnas. F. 
Brooks. Geo. T. 



AUmorpt. Uij 
Bart, Mrs. C. 
Bertere, Elsie 
Bocilfy. Annie 
Brownlnc. Henry 

* Mrs. 
Blair. SMrlrr 
Campbell. Mm. 

Legos 



Bray. Willie 
Carer, L. 
Clinton. Donald 
Campbell. E. 
Can, Geo. 
Currier. frank 
De Vole, Dare 

Ml 

Dellorelll. Joe 
Dare, Frank B. 
Darey, Artlrar 



Bryan, Blancbe 
Claire, Leslie 
Dunn Marguerite 

V. 
Darenport, Flor- 

enee 
Dwyer. Lottie 
Dints. Gtrtrode 

L 



GENTLEMEN 

Dukes, Frank H. Huntley. J. H. 



Darling, a. r. 

Edmonds, Darld 
Fallon. Cues. L. 
Fulton, Cbaa. 
Greene, Will a 

Babe 
Gano. Chas. E. 
Glasgow, Jaa. 
George, AlTtn 
Harford, Jack 



Houland. Oscar V. 
Herman, r»»t 
Hanley, Norman 
Hallen. Fred 
Holt, V. 
Kerr. Herbert 
Latrrenxe. Bert 
Leahy, Cbas. 
Lewis. Cbas. E. 



LADIES 



Elslna, Nell 
Forrest. Dorothy 
Con. Edith 
Gordon. Mrs. K. 

W. 
Howard. Mrs. E. 

M 
Heldell. Anne 
Haielton. Dalsey 



Hesrne, Harold 
Johnson. Dorothy 
Jones. Base 
Klngaley, Annie 
La Salle. Babe 
Mams. Emma 
Mantel]. Guide 
Nlelson. Carla 
Post. Louise 



Lewis, Edgar 

Lyle, Jobs Q. 

Murphy, K J. 

Koran, Jack 
Manhall, Lew 
McFatrldge, Hnfo 
UcBee. Billy 
Milton. Geo. w. 
McAnallan, Joe 
Newmans. The 
Bhrtnstrom. Flo 
St. Pierre. L. A. 

Paull. Madsa 
Powers, Edith 
Robeson. Erha 
Briers, Margaret, 
Beld. Pearl 
St. Leon. Ida 
Stoner. Jessie 
Selkirk. Hazel 
Sllrers. Erelyn 



Stlmpooo. Geo. 
Sharp, Bert 

Stokes. K. K. 

ShaexTcr, Frank 
Troott, Arthur 
Tuottpson, E. F. 
Taylor a Coleman 
Vina], E. A. 
Wsliron. J. L. 
Williams, Harold 

* AUea 
ZaxeU. H. M. 



Talrao. Juno 
Wood. Miss Nell 
Wellington. Bene 
Wayne, rtatbryn 

II. 
West, OUre 



SONGWRITER GOT HER COIN. 

A jury in Justice Philbin's part of the 
Bronx County Court, last Thursday, 
awarded Anna Levine a judgment of 
$1,300 in her suit against Frederick P. 
Chase, a songwriter of Plainfield, N. J. 
Miss Levine claimed that Cbase bad ob- 
tained $1,600 from her at different times, 
promising to invest the money for ner in 
a music publishing company. 

HIPPODROME 

MANAGEMENT CHARLES DILLINGHAM 

Nights at 8.15. Mat. ewerx day, S-1S. 

••THE BIG SHOW" 

STAGED BT B, B. BDBSBtDB 

**«™ KELLERMAN 

I 100 NOVELTIES 



(HERSELF) 

NHW ICE I UaUMOTH 

BALLET I MINSTBELB 



1000 PEOPLE 



KNICKBlfiOCKfR «* 



Klaw * aklaacar. 



B'war a awtn 
• t S.JO. Mara. 
Sat, no. 



GEORGE ARLISS 



In his arreataat enccesa 



«C 



»•> 



Cohan & Harris 



Bres. 8.20. 



THEATRE 

Was* awl Bt. 
Call Bryant «S44. 
Mats. Wad. 4 Sat. at fcJO. 



»> 



"THE WILLOW TREE 

a nun-AST or jatas. 

By Baarims and Harrison Rhodes. 



ErV/f piDC B'way, 40 8t. Bra. 8.80 
"l r 1 t*. Ill uata. wed. * Bat. 1M 

CHASLES FBOHJIAH FBESEBTffB 

MAUDE ADAMS 

A KISS FOR CINDERELLA 

J. M. HARRIETS OREATEST TRlDUPn. 



B. F. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway & 4Ttb St. 

Mat. Dally at 2 P. M. 
25. SO and T5c. 
Every M 1 g { t 
2Ti-30.75-81-al.60. 



OEETEDDE HOFFMArTN 
Ul GEKTBTJDE H0FF- 
XAmrs BEVXTE, WJERS 
op CAVANAQH, ELIZA- 
BETH XTJBRAT, SARAH 
PADDEN & CO., WILLIE 
WEBTON, AL HERMAN . 
D'AVIONEATJ'S CHINESE 
DUO, UBS. CASTLE In 
"PAXBIA." 



■7 | TtMsCa? THEATRE W. 42d St. Era. at fi.nn 
CLII HUE Mate. WM. A Sat. 



a. WOODS preaenta 



CHEATING CHEATERS 



By MAX MABCIN. 

MONDAY. APRIL 16 JANE COWL In 

TIME" moves from- Republic Theatre. 



'LILAC 



GAIETY 



THEATRE. B'waj A 46th 
St. Ewew. at 8.20. Mate 
Wed. A Sat. at 2.20. 
WINCHELL SMITH and JOHN L, GOLDEN 
Prevent the season's success 

TURN TO THE RIGHT 



VERA MICHELENA ASKS DIVORCE 

Vera Michelena, actress, has begun a 
suit for divorce from Paul Schindler, mu- 
sical director. They have been married 
nine years. The suit is brought in Queens 
county as Mrs. Schindler resides at Bay- 
side. 



B'WATA4SdST. Em. 8.28. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat. 2.25. 



OEO . M. 

COHAN'S 

KLAW A BRLANOKR. Manaswrs 

HENRY MILLER pres en ts 

RUTH CHATTERTON 

•me: Company, tnclodlnff Brnc* MeRia, 1b 

"COME OUT OP THE KITCHEN" 

DCI gem »'«««- TbnrH. and Sat. 2.20. 
M9KttLtt%a\*U We«r,44tb St. Eves. 8.20. 

DAVID BELASCO* Presents 

ARNOLD DALY 

in a New Tlay by JOHN MEEEAN. 

"The Ve ry Minute'' 

W. 42d St. Bvea. 8.1S. Mats. 
Wed. and Saturday 2.13. 

Joan Mason. Irene Fenwlck, Helen Tire, Kathllde 
CottreUy, Helen Lowell, Richard Bennett, Law 

Fields, Willis P. Sweatnam. In 

"BOSOM FRIENDS" 



LIBERTY 



By FRANK MANUEL. 



LYCEUM 



45th St. & B'way. Etm. 8.30 
Mats. Thnre. A Sat. ZM. 
SEASON'S BIG DRAMATIC TRIUMPH! 
HERALD— 

THE CASE OF 



LADY CAMBER 



TrndenlaUa Success, 

WORLD— 

"PoTJolar Bucoess." 

8DN— 

"A Thriller.- 



NEW M0R0SC0 THEATRE 

43th ST., Jaat w. at B'war. Rwma Bryaat BM. 

»ea. &15. Mats. Wad. and Sat. US. 
Ollrar Moroaoo'a Great Mulcal Tana with (Mrla. 

CANARY COTTAGE 

WITH TBHIE RIOABTA, 
Charles Bnssrles and 'Herbert OarthelL 



CORT 

lnMiliinsr Biipce«6. 

UPSTAIRS -DOWN 

BY FREDERIC A FANNY HATTON 



West 18 tb St.. Phone Bryant 49. 
Ere. at £.20. Mate. Wed. A Sat. 
2.30. Oliver Moroaco'e great 
Season's One Snbstantlal success 



FULTON 



THEATRE. WEST 40th ST. 

free. It 8.90. Hats. Wad. A 
Sat. 2.30. 
fres ZTsnrrnicAjr p ro . oot . 



WILLIAM 

COURTENAY 



le a 1 

Confer 



TH08. A. 

WISE 



PALS FIRST SUr. 



HUDSON M .uVwed. 8 * s .lr 818 - 

Estate of Henry B. Harris, Hnaager. 

JOHN 9. WILLIAMS Presents 

The Haw Three-Act Comedy 

"OUR BETTERS" 

By M. SOstSXSBT MATJOKAM 



SAM MORRIS 

Author of Ashley and Alman's new act "The Dawn 
of a New Day," of N. S. Feldman's Players in "The 
Garden Belles," and "The Trip of Pleasure," the dra- 
matic playlet "The Editor," and now writing GUS 
HILL'S shows for the season 1917-1918. Interview 
by appointment. Address 

24 SMITH ST. BROOKLYN 



ACKERMANN-QUIGLEY LITHO. CO. 

■tM H5.I2I WEST FIFTH ST., KANSAS CITY, MO. 

DATE BOOKS 



=»■- Sa>aaon of 191' 
Mailed Free On Request 



8 Nov*/ Ready 
Write for YouP Copy 



CHAS. BIEHLER TOM DONNELLY 

BURLINGTON FOUR 



in "Hokcmvllle" 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 

BILL NICHOLSON 



BILL HORN 



BENTELL BROS. 



Acrobatic Dancers 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Oii«ctxosa MARK MONROE 



PHYLLIS .EUGENE 

CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 



By HERMAN KAHN 

Copyr»afht#d 



FANNIE 



an inr 



"TAKING CHANCES. 1 



Dsretetkm MARK LEVY 



SKATING VENUSES 

IN VAUDEVILLE Direction HARRY WEBER 

DAILE 

Upside Down Comedians 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



C. H. HASKELL, Mgr— IDA BUTLER— SAM GILLETT1 HARMONY SINGING 



HENRY 



l M. 



Eccentricities In Songs and Dances 



RUTH 

U 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



AND 



JOE 

tT 

Direction HARRY PINCUS 



AND 

IN "A VAUDEVILLE SURPRISE" 



BOOKED SOLID V. B. O. 



DIRECTION JACK MACANN 



PAUL, LE VAN & D0BBS 

ACROBATIC COMEDIANS IN VAUDEVILLE 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11. 1917 



hits HARRY 



TILZER hits 



1 

3 


| 


HITS 


H 

3Er 



OUR BIG BALLAD HIT WITH POEM 



"SOMEONE'S MORE LONESOME THAN YOU 

OUR BIG HAWAIIAN SONG HIT 

"ON THE SOUTH SEA ISLE" 



»» 



» 



OUR BIG NOVELTY SONG HIT 

"JUST THE KIND OF A GIRL 

ANOTHER— LAST NIGHT WAS THE END OF THE WORLD 

"LOVE WILL FIND THE WAY" 



HITS 1 HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO. uitc 



222/ WEST; 46TH STREET, NEW YORK GITY 



3EW BORN5TEIN, Prof. Mgr. 



MEYER COHEN, Bus. Mgl 



RECOGNIZED AS THE BIGGEST APPLAUSE WINNER IN MODERN MUSICAL REVUES 



My 

Lyric by JACK FROST 






Lyric by JACKTROST , Music by PAUL BIESE and F. HENRI KLICKMANN 

Why? Because, as live producers will tell you, it has the dreamy, double-beat melody and easily-mastered lyric required 

for die better class of "girl shows." '. _ : 1". '*>'■'.. - . ; ' . 

McKlnley Music Co., Cohan's Grand Opera House Bldg., Chicago 



WANTED-Burlesque People 

For CHAS. B. WAIDRON'S 

BOSTONIANS 

SEASON 1917-1918 
Good Principal. Burlesque people of all kinds. 
Quartette capable of playing parts. Good Sitter 
Act and soubrette, and any good Novelty suitable 
for Burlesque. Address, 

CHARLES H. WALDRON, 

Waldrbn's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



i!ft a proff 



■ s hr.iutiful loyv Ij. 



You Carved Your Name Into Mv Heart' 



tlAiiiHT' S>)-\M1 U: \1L -K CO 



B 
O 
O 

K 

E 
D 

S 
O 

L 
I 
D 



tiUD6L-n0RT0ri 



3i*i or 

MELLODY- 




H 
A 
R 
R 
Y 

W 

E 
B 
E 
R 



EDDIE VINE 

to "A Study in Songs" 



ALLEN 



April 11. 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



VAUDEVILLE 

F&s* Next W&®lk 




U. B. O. CIRCUIT 

HEW TOBX CITY. 
Palao*— Gertrude Hoffman and Co.— Clark and 
Hamilton— Dugan and Raymond— "Patria." four- 
teenth, episode. (Five acta to ail.) 

.Royal— lack Alfred A Co.— J. Small A Co.— 
Grand Opera Four. 

Colonial— Ward A Van — J. Warren Keene — Im- 
perial Chinese,, two — I.ncr Valmoot A Co.— Joa. 
E. Bernard A Co.— Florence Moore A Bro. — Lam- 
bert * Ball. 

Alhambra— Guerln A Newell— Apdale's Animals 
—Four Husbande — Regal A Bender — Carlisle & 
Rome? — Margaret YounR — Jane Connolly. 

Bhrcrside — Nan Halperln— Joe Cook— Eddie 
Leonard & Co. — Mabel Russell A Co. — John B. 
Hymer— Four Readings — Mae Irwin. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bushwiok — Klrby & Rome — Gerard & Clark — 
Bee Ho Gray A Co.— Milt Collins— Lloyd A Brltt 
— "Creation" — The Brlghtons — Savoy & Brennan — 
Genevieve Cliff A Co. 

Orpheum— Sharrocks — Florrle Mlllereblp — Abbott 
& White — Cole. Bunnell A Davis— Rock A Whit* 
— March's Llooe — Two Carletona — "The Head- 
liners." 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Keith's— Dooley A Sales— Bailie Fisher— Andy 
Bice— Lewi, A White — Mme. Dor** A Co. — Edge 
of the World.— Pegry Bremen & Co. 
BUFFALO. H. T. ' 

BWi— I. A B. Morgan— Digs Nlahka A Co.— 
AL Herman— Spencer A Williams— Selma Braata 
—"Night Boat." 

BALTIMORE. MD, 

Maryland — Bert Johnson— Jordan Olrla— Bennett 
A Richards— Rlcbarda.- A Kyle — Valerie Bergere — 
Herr Jansen— Geo. Damerel A Co.— Craig Camp- 
bell. 

CINCINNATI. OHIO. 

Keith's— Brltt Wood— Bobt. T. Halnaa A Co.— 
Kens Parker— Dong Fong Que A Haw— Clifford 
A Wills. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

Keith's— Fay, Two Coleya A Fay — Kelly A Wil- 
der — "Forest Fire" — Maxrolllian's Dog* — J. A M. 
Harklns — Whipple Huston A Co. — Kaltaar A 
Itrown. 

COLUXBTTB. 0. 

Kalth'a— Oscar Lorslne — Those French Girls— 
lanrle A Bronaon — Nellie Allen A Co.— Montgom- 
ery A Perry — Mercedes — Bowman Bros. 
DAYTON, OHIO. 

Kalth'a — Walter Brower— Th* Vlvlsns -Willi- 
Reeyea A Co. — Fern A Dayls — Haywsrd Stafford A 
Co. — Aron Font — Dehl A allien. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Tempi* — Primrose '. Four— Meenan's Dogs— Delro 
—Kane Bros. — Eddie Foy A Co. — McKay A Ar- 
■dlo*— 1MB McMillan A Co. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 
Empress — Wm. filsto — Mrs. Gen* Hughes — 
Asahl Troop*— Bell* Baker— At A Fannie Stead- 
man — Beatrice Morrell Beat. — Annette Asorla A 
Co. — Flying Henrys. 

HAMILTON, CAN. 
Tomple — R. A O, Dooley — Oarclnettl Bros. — 
Lewis A Felber— Berry A Berry— Jos. L. Brown- 
ing— "Maids of Phllly." 

INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 
Ormnd — Pag*, Rack A Mack — "Honor Thy Chil- 
dren" — Three Ihi For Boys — California Boys 
Band. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Keith's (First Half)— Bath Bndd— Duffln Bed- 
<ay Troupe. (Laat Half) — Lavenberg Slaters — Al 

Shayne. 

LOITISVILLE. XT. 

Keith's — Nelson Waring— Raymond A Caverly— 
Six Water LUUcs — Jasper— H. A B. Pock — Qrace 
DeMar. 

MONTREAL, CAM. 
Orphanm— Shelly A Sanvatn— Atnertean Comedy 
I'our — Bob Albright— Dancing Girl of Delhi— Mme. 

Reason A Co. 

• NASHVILLE. TENN. 

Princess (First Half) — Warren A Conley — Win 
•Oakland A Co.— Ska. Collen. (Laat Half)— 'Used 
Box Bevue"— Roger Gray A Co. — Winona Winters 
—Stan Stanley Trio. 

PITTSBURGH. PA. 

Davis — Maryland Singers — Harold Dn Kan* A 
■Co. — Ema Antonio Trio — Emily A. Wellmsn A Co. 
—Harry Carroll. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Keith's— Scotch Lads A Lassies— Ed. Morton— 
Mclntyre A Heath— Peacock Alley— Bernle A 
Raker— Fonr Barls— Lillian Shaw. 

ROCHESTER. H. T, 

Temple— Yvette — Selma Braata — Salle A Monde 
— Cnpt, Anson A Co. — "Fire of rciubs" — "Bnbe- 
Till*" — King A Harvey — Harry Holman A Co. 
SAVANNAH, G A. 

Savannah (First Half) — LoTenberg Sinters— Al 
Shayne. (last Half)— Both Budd— Duffln Bed- 
cay Troop*. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's— I.yd.ll A Hlgains— Chas. F. Aldrich— 
Helen Page — Emllle Sisters — RoekweR A Wood — 
Toota Pnka A Co. — Dainty Marie — David -Baper- 
-ateln— Wm. Boa A Co. 

TOBOMTO, CAM. 
Shea's— Pranaiyn Ardell A Co.— IJghtner A 
Alexander — Bath Bros. — Fenton A Green. 
WASHINGTON, B. 0. 
Keith's — Bran B. Fontaine — Bert Melrose — 
Moaner. Hayes A Mosher— Hallen A Hunter- 
Leah Nora— Nat Wills— Keny A Galrln. 

Keith's— Sophie Tucker A Co. — Weston A 
• Claire — Booth A Leander— Swor A 
Baker A Co. — Brengh'a Models. 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Mojeitio (Pint Half)— Era Tanguay— Ponzllto 
8lsters — Asellng A Lloyd — Imhoff, Conn A Cor- 
rene— MeCarty A Faye— Wallace Galrln— The 
Crisps. 

Palace (First Half)— Grace La Boe— Clayton 
White A Co. — Jaa. C. Morton A Co. — Ames A 
Wlnthrop — Odlva — Diamond A Brennan — Clara 
Howard — Martinettl A Sylvester. 
CALGARY, CAN. 
Orphanm — Leroy, Talma A Bosco — Jan* Cour- 
thope A Co.— Bob Deely A Co.— Mllllcent Mower 
— G. Aldo Badegger. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphanm— Morgan Dancers— H. A A. Seymour — 
Caltea Bros. — Walter Weems— Everest's Monkeys 
— Rice Rimer A Tom — Flanagan A Edwards. 
DUTUTH, MZNN. 
Orpheum — Dorothy Shoemaker A Co. — De Leon 
A Davles— Herbert Clifton— Boyle A Brown— Nov- 
elty Clintons — Leach Wallen Trio — Nordstrom A 
Pinkham. 

. DEB MOINES, IA. 
Orpheum — Nat Goodwin — Maria Lo — Henry 
Keane A Co.— Hana Ranke — Maurice Burknait— 
Three Jahns— Biggs A Wltcnle. 

KANSAS OTTO, HO. 
; Orphenm — Claude Gllllngwater A Co.— Harnko 
Churl— Howard's Animals — Thos. Bwlft A Co. — 
J. O. Nugent A Co. — Benny A Woods— Natalie A 
Ferrari. ' ' . 

. LOB ANOELES, CAL. 
' Orphanm— Rita ", Mario Orchestra— Ncwbotr A 
Phelps— Natalie Alt— Lydla Barry — Herat Hayes — 
Whiting A Burt— Geo. Kelly A Co.— Lew Doek- 
.atader. ' ■ 

LmCOLH, NEB. 
Orphanm— Dorothy Jardon— Halien ft Fuller— 
Corbett Sheppard A Donongb — Wheeler A Dolan— 
Pat Barrett— Better Bros. — Beatrice Herford. 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orphanm — Geo. Nash A Co. — Nellie Nichols- 
Dorothy Brenner— Foster Ball A Co.— Witt A 
Winter— Frank A Toble. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orphenm Tack Norwortb — Hyams A Mclntyre 
—Mullen A Coogan — Valleclta'a Leopards — Lam- 
bert A Fredrichs— Frank Hartley. 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Orphanm — IjouIs Mann A Co.— Wbltfleld A Ire- 
land— Bva Taylor A Co. — Kerr A Bcrko — Black 
A White — Willing A Jordan — Australian Crelgh- 
tona. 

Wanted Bailable 

Chorus Girls 

who wish all sum- 
mer work, running 
Into next regnlsr sea- 
son. Can use spe- 
cialty team, also top 
tenor. All week and 
two week atands. 
Require versatile 
musical comedy 

people. Georg* Floo- 
rer, writ* quick. 
HARRY W. MARCH, 

Augusta, Maine, this 
week: Bath, Main*, 
week of 10. 




AT LIBERTY 



Mia. GERTRUDE LIVINGSTON 

Characters, Heavies, Grand Dames and Gen. 
Bus.. 'Prefer Stock or Rep. Address 309 East 
Ave.. Rochester. N. Y. ■ 

WANTPti Uac " Tsa's Calls tmdfr ranro. open 
T» Mil I CU May 15. Ws*s* Shew Aeeat with wagon 
show sxprrlenw. lady sr Child for Eva. Csaallu asl 
Astsrs woo doable brass. Ws never close. THOS. t_ 
FINN. Hssslsk FslU, NSW York 

WaVTPn K ' :r H ™" n0 « owns Co Hia for Cis. 
If fill I Bale Bbs.. Inclnrilng one or two Strang old mm 
character porta. Most do specialties and Changs for week 
Wardrobe, Ability and .Experience essential. Salary must 
be low for spring and summer engagement. ObW *i*fa| 
rsfsrWr* assets doing speclsltles write. BICHABD HEB- 
DEIMR, sit risssaat. Mkh.. e/o Haeaartsa Stssk Ca. 

WANTED QUICK 

FBBOBCLE IBM'S csaia— rcal accaT Msa far Tsa. 
Ds.Hi niatas or Harris, .Corset to Double Stare, Other 
Uufsl Psspls doubling band. Hotel show pay your own. 
Show never closes. Preference given to people doing Special- 
ties. Be ready to join on wire. Address BEIBABD 
■sGtAw, CltMSSrt, New Vera. Alios- time for Bull to 
o0 f otVwLnfed. 



ClilGiGO 
MbHUSCRIPT CO 



MAriUSCRIPT FLAYS. 



^nusicAL.concoics 

TABLOIDS. ETC. 



«31 MO. CLr.BK ST. CHICAOO.I1.L 



WANTED 

LEADING MAN, at once. Spring- and Summer 
Repertoire. State all. ROWLEY A GAY CO, 
«»2 Paari St.. Buffalo. N. Y. 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty 5t, I A M, to II P. H, 

and at Midnight with SUapara 

is MINUTES OF TUB HOUR 

From W. 23d St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABU 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P. Afsnl 
U4B BROADWAY, NEW YORK . 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICKS 



.$17 JB I M bacli. 
. IBAB BlsBca. 
. l».aa at bach 



rest 



WILLIAM BAL COMPAQ 

145 W. 45th SL, N. Y. 4 W. 22d St., N. Y 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Orasra FlBasJ Saaaa Day Racadwsa 

IB D spsslt Ra^aaraa 

Liberal Reward 

paid for infonnation leading to the where- 

about* of 

J. A. and Charlotte L Foobes 

formerly In the moving' picture buainciB. 
Addr«m W. a RIPPEY, 700 Franldio Ave, 
Columbus, Ohio. 



Telephone 6568 Bryant 

TRUNKS REPAIRED *:«?„ 

3Bt Wast 41st St., Comer »th Av*. 

Formerly with Quick service 

Taylor Trunk Works Returned in 24 hours 



Manicuring. Hair Drrsatng, Scalp Treatment, Sham- 
pooing, Toilet Preparations, Boudoir Noreltl**. 

"LA MARSH" SHOP 
1482 Broadway, Boom 701 (» a. m. to 8 p. m.) 

Special attention given member* of 

Phone Bryant 2297 Theatrical Profession 



Wanted for Next Season 

Clutrna I ailles for 
THE BEltr TRUST 

Also Small Olrla for th* 
UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Also. want good feature acta, and people In all 
tinea of Burlesque. Address BILLT WATB0H. 
Orphanm Theatre. Faterson, H. J. 



MAGIC! 



I ACT6 FOB BALE CHEAP. W* 
,Buy, Sell or Ezcnange nsed 
Apparatns. Professfnnsl Cats, 
log 10c. Pocket Trick Included FRBK. Write or 
Call. Hnmman Magic Co., Sta. 1, 470 (th Av..M. T. 



W. H. HARRIS, tmanIK^ 

2a» W— t Mth Strwat. New York 

Stor.booaw— Jlt-317 W. nth Strwat 

Phone Greelejr 1474 Trunks Cared For 



Bailey Studios (Scenery) 

rUgn QBMBs Scsaaarw. at Wsltssw IMiii 

WHITE RAT TRANSFER CO., Inc. 

■BMBsl sad BaSCACE. aaataga ttsraas st law lats. 
14 T WavSt 37th Strwat, Nsw York 



NEWEST 

and greatest collection of rmude- 

»aie comedy materiaj in th* worieL 

THE NEW No. 8 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

Erwrythlag New. Brtjat sad OrtgtsaJ 
PRICE BI.OO 

MoMAIXTB HTUTTII Ma, B soatatas 
IT ssrigaaTaO MOMOXVOSirxS. Sm Ho- 
st™. Irlah. Haah and WU* Faaa. OwtaS, 
Tranap. Wop, l^suale and Btacnp B pssr O . 

10 OAEAT ACTS FOE TWO MALES. Each 
act an applaose winner. 

t BOABOsO a.CTa ros BALI ABO R> 
M*TK . TtMJ'll make good *a any Nil. 

<• BT/BX-FIBX PABOBIXS. On all of 
Bro adwa y's lates t Bong Hits. 

A OOBDEDT BXXTCR. Entitled "ANXIOD8 
TO OKT BICB." It's th* rONNlBST 
BKsTTCH In Vaudeville 

MeMAIXT'S MBBJtT XIItTaZU. rjoa 
slsting of sla corking riBBT PABT8. end 
log with a screaming Finals. "NOT 
OU11.TT." 

A TABLOID OOMXST AMD BrraugaQtrg. 
•nUtlal "IT'S VODB WIFa"; also haa 
drada of Ooss-rtr* Gags and J*«aa aad 
adnTOonnJ Comaiy Bmu r la sa. Benwsaes, 
the prtea of UcNAI.I.va BDIXBTIN Be. 
I la only 0SB DOliAB, par ropy, with 
orawey-faaefc gnarant**. 

WB. BcHAUT. SI E. IZSth St.. New Test 



' Human Hearts Co. " 



For 



Ottt 



Good street drummer and Tuba player 
to double small parts or orchestra. Ad- 
dress by mail only. C. R. RENO, 1402 
Broadway, New York. 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS, 
VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

New aad Sweoad Haad Scaaaey ha Stack 

HURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 

Columbia Theatrw Bldg., 47th A Broadway 
Tel. Bryant 1343 Tom .Creamer. Mar. 



The Broadway Theatrical Coftiniof. C«. 

announce- their removal from ISO Weet 48th 

Btreet. New York, to 

Number 116 on tarns Straw*. 

when will be exhibited a complete . line ot 

Union* and Original Costume*, which os*r b* 

either rented or purchased. 

Call up Bryant IMO. 



EARLE CRADDOCK 

Producing Director, Metropolitan Theatre, 
Oklahoma City, Okla., Invitee offsrs (or the 
Summer season 1917. Producer, or characters 
and comedy. Experienced and reliable. Age 
50 .weight 32S, height 6 It. Reduring M.S.S. a 
specialty. Address care Metropolitan Thaatrw, 
OhUhom. City. Ohio. 

Sose" dampTer 

Second Bus., Heavies, Singing Specialtiea. 
Height 5 feet 4H inches; weight UO pouruja. 
Stock or Kep. Care Can. Del., Omaha, Neb. 

30c.— BIG BUNCH— 30c. 

Of Acts, Gags, Parodtea, etc. Money Back Qair- 
snie-e-' CatBk.it foe Atanoj). MARY THAYER, 
tm Brocd gt ( Pnri.dw.ii*. H, I. 

36 ParTJEHS 25 CERTS 

lm Mrs Kind on lata snogs. Mooty Back Onarsatssl 
■Air TH>Tt». 2190 Brail it. rmisasoi. I i. 

Lady Partner (Bet. 30-40) 

Wanted, who can sing, plsy piano or dance a la 
Irish or Scotch Fling; Will teach dancing. But* 
particulars. VAUDEVILLE, care Clipper. 




YES! 
JUST 
OUT 

Loaded to tbe muzzle with comicality and orig- 
inality — and best of all It'a SUBaVflBB. 

PUN.N'TBONB No. S contains acts of every 
description, Including s new monologue, "Tbe 
Fair Sex"; an act for two males. "Two Bona 
of Uncle 8am"; an act for male and female, 
"My Uncle's Will"; a farce for 6 people, 
"Debbie's Troubles"; greet minstrel first part; 
3 parodies on late *ong bits; SO funny gags; 
also stage poems, etc. Bemember. tbe price 
of KUNNYtiONB No. 5 U only 33 cents; or 
will send any two Issues for 60 rent e, any S 
for 75 cents, any 4 for fi: or FUNNYBONB 
l. 2, 3. * and 8 for (1.29. arBBBSBOBB 
FUBIJ8Kr»0 00., Wo. I0M Third Al 
Its Terk <D«.pt. C). 



30 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER April 11, 1917 




JOHNIY! OH JOHNNY! OH! 

By ROSE and OLMAN 

The Greatest Comedy Song in Years. You can't help but be a hit with it in your act 

MISSOURI WALTZ 

HUHHRE MA BABY 

Ballad Singers: You will add class and dignity to your act by singing this song — 

The most unusual Ballad in years. 

FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, £ 

NEW YORK: 146 West 45th St. Mfr . T7 t CHICAGO: 42 Grand Opera House Bldg. 

TOM PAY! ON, Mmnm<«- ■ ■ r~«M^>l I T ', MARVIN LEE, Manager 



NOTICE! 



* * 



First New York Appearance 

MR. RAY ROTTACK 

(The Golden Voiced Tenor and Y odder) 
. \ — AT— 

MARCUS LOEW'S NATIONAL THEATRE 

Wednesday April 11th 
MATINEE AND NIGHT ONE DAY ONLY 



AGENTS AND MANAGERS ARE INVITED 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



AT B. F\ KEITH'S ALHAMBRA THEATRE THIS WEEK, APRIL. © 

BE N =—= PHIL 

BERNIE =^Le= 

"THE SYNCOPATED FUNSTERS** 
At B. F. Keith's Theatre, Philadelphia, Week of April 16 At B. F. Keith's Royal Theatre, Week of April 23 



BAKER 



DIRECTION-LEWIS AND GORDON 



At B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre, Week of April 30 



MUSICAL COMEDY STOCK MANAGERS 
FRANK BERTRAND 

MUSICAL COMEDY PRODUCER 

AND COMEDIAN 

AT LIBERTY FOR THE SUMMER 

15 yean' experience in Royalty Musical' Comedies. Played comedy in over do. Staged over 
40. .Recently staged, launched and developed several successful Musical Comedy Repertoire 
Cos. playing such snows as Broken Idol, Madam Sherry, Florodora. Red Widow, My Best 
Girl, Three Twins, Dolly Varden, etc. (Specialist in Patriotic Military Numbers). Reference: 
Eastern Theatre Managers that have played these shows. Address FRANK BERTRAND, 
can' March's Mil, leal Marry Makers, Week April 9th to 14th, Theatre. Augusta, Me.: Week 
April 16th to 21st, Theatre, Bath, Me. Permanent Address cars NEW YORK CUPPER, 
MM Broadway, New York City. 



LONA FENDELL STOCK CO. 

Wants Gen. Bus. Man. Gen. Bus-. Woman. Good specialty people to double parts. PIANIST 
balance season in theatres, all summer in tent; Boozers, save stamps. State all first letter. 

DANIEL J. FENDELL, Fond da Lac, Wis. 

K. B.— Joe Tonuitti. where are you? 



BUD WALKER 

They tell me I sing like Al Jolson. I with the manager. 
would toll mo that. 
Direction JACK MACANN. 



"WANTED FOR MAYO STOCK COMPANY" 

People in all tinea, Juvenile Man, Comedian, Character Women, Gen. Bus. Women, 
Man who can play piano and double in a small part. Specialty people preferred. 
State lowest summer salary. Enclose photo and latest program. COMPANY 
REHEARSES APRIL 23rd, OPENS THE 30th. ALL BOOKED UP. Address 
CHAS. RONDEAU. 49 Pleasant SL, Worcester. Mass. 



WANTED-A PRODUCER 

who can organise and direct strictly first class miniature musical comedies of between 10 to 14 people 
and change weekly on a liberal percentage basis, most bare scripts and ehorna wardrobe, for hustling 
clty 10,000 working people with no summer resort near. Indefinite summer engagement for the right 
men, which correitpontlence will rcvpsl good possibilities. Most be ready to open week of April 80. 
Address st once, LEE at HARRIS, sign,. Corning Opera Rouse, Corning, H. Y. Capacity 1,000. 



At Liberty— Miss Ella Kramer 

Feature leading woman. C A. BRAISTED, Bus. Mgr. Write or wire. C. A. 
BRAISTED, Gen. Del., McKcesport, Pa. 



RUTH ROBINSON 

I jedftig Woman 

MOROSCO THEATRE, LOS ANGELES 
America's Foremost Productions 




PERRON S DETECTIVE AGKNCY Harry W Ferron. Principal. Licence! Au- 
thoiu^d by State, Bonded. Personal to Ihrairical Profession. Personal Civil And 
j-riminal I,, v<i<tiga«.innj connrU-nt'inlly conducted. Phone, Day .ind Nii>hl 2107-2193 
Bryant. Fili^er-ild Bide,., 14K2 Broadwny.iN.-w York Cily. !- ' 



SONGWRITERS 



rwrsrsrs tsw: 




SENT FREE 



» CCpyrleTtlt end semBsmtl 



" STbmQS&iffiiftThZtac. MML^ii Y. Oty 



ee: >rf- 

a y\ e: 



UR 



GUARANTEED 
BEST MADE 



Young Ingenue, Leading Woman, Ability, Appearance, Wardrobe. Address "M.D.," 

Care New York Clipper. 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty AuUted by R AYE DUNN 

Direction FRANK EVANS 



Jane Ware & Co. 

in "A TEXAS TANGO," By Frank L. Whittier 

Dir«ti<,„ EVELYN BLANCHARD 



Maude Hollingsworth at Liberty 

Stock Ls ae sa sM Lady, ingenue type.; a|S, twenty-two; heignt, fin feet, four and 
naif. Up in latest releases. Just closed Orpbeum Theatre Stock, Jacksonville, 
Florida. Address Piedmont, Alabama. 



SIX IMPS and A GIRL 



In Vaudeville 




FEATURING 



Vincent Dusey 

In REVUE De VOGUE 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

Wants The Beat In Vaudeville 



sett* at. Orsnras- BUg, z.7 Market St, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY. 



PHONE SS MARKET 



JOHN BRUNTON STUDIOS 

Productions of Every Description 

For Public, Private, Professional and Non-Professional Performances 

SCENERY. PROPERTIES, STAGE FURNISHINGS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Telephone! Bryant 5914 226 WEST 41ST STREET, NEW YORK 



CENTRAL TRUNKS 

20 In., ,13.60: 28 ln„ $14.50: 92 In.. $15.80; 80 In., $16.50: 40 In., $lfl 00. Clrens Trunks. 24xMxU. 
$1.1.50. Kill Trunks, 30x28x18. Inside, $17.00. Lltno Trunks. 42Kx28Hxl3. Inside. $20.00. Shipped OK 
receipt of $3, balance C. 0. D., except orer 300 miles, then remit the whole amount. 
CENTRAL TBTJFNK FACT0EY. Eat. 1884. 8TM0N8 at CO., 8. W. eor. Tth and Arc h Streets, Philadelphia. 

EARY & EARY 



WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS 



NEW TO THE EAST 



TENNEY 



like <ks Parcel Peat "daUrara the goods." Acts, seaTawea, and monologues wrtttss 
rirht. Thsy'rs full cf originality, "pep" and "rot-ow." Don't wUb for . 00OD 
act, Bars Tsnney write you ess. Qui rasiuuuSBoa asiuritad. 

AUXa* ■PZaTCZE lUHI, .To. MM Broadway, JTaw Tark dry. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



A HIT BY ACCLAMATION! 



MOTHER'S 
GREAT 

WAR 
SOISfG! 



A Mother's Song 
^ of F*atriotism ! 



Here's Your! Copy 




Here's 
Your 
Copy 



The 
Purielr! 



A Real 

H fir III! 



Every time you 

sing this truly great song 

you are serving your country. 

That's why; we are handing it to 

you we dph't care if we never se 1 1 

a copy and|hat goes! Learn it now and 

send to office nearest you for orchestration 



CREATES A SEN- 
SATION NO MATTER 
WHERE YOU S IN G IT 

LEARN IT NOW! 



BOSTON 

81 TREMONT ST. 

PHILADELPHIA 



LEO E E IS T, inc. 

135 W; 44th St, IVEW- YORK 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE B'L'D'G. 



ST. LOUIS 

Tth;and OLIVE ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Ajril 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



"MILLION-DOLLAR 

DOLLS" GIVES SPEEDY 
SHOW AT THE COLUMBIA 

Lew- Hilton, as the featured comedian 
in the "Hotel de Gink," kept the show go- 
in? at* tbp speed on Monday night at the 
Columbia, and his example was followed 
by all the principals. The cast includes 
performers of class; 

Slem Kellan, -a' tall, thin comedian, 
shows original ideas in fun making and, 
although heavily handicapped by a bad 
knee, which seemed to grow worse as the 
show progressed, he did good work. 

Savo, in funny make-up and manner, 
had several successful innings, especially 
in his Chaplin impersonation for the Mo- 
tion Picture number, led by Miss Sey- 
mour. 

Harry Mandel appeared as a natty 
straight and has a good voice. 

Alice Lazar sustained her reputation as 
a high-grade prima donna, and enjoyed the 
show as much as the audience did. Her 
gowns were well worth while, and she 
acted and sang befitting her station. 

Grace Seymour did clever work as the 

maid and for her numbers "Daddy" "At 

the Movies," also for her specialty for 

which she used "Ob, Johnny" and "He 

' May. Be Old," she was repeatedly encored. 

Another clever little girl is Patricia 
Baker, a dainty ingenue with good so- 
prano voice, useful in several numbers, 
notably "I Love Ton"- and "Honolulu." 
Her dresses were also very striking cre- 
- ations. ■'- ?-' 

Bob Ferns appeared in the black face 
role and was also scheduled for his spe- 
cialty, attired in purple. "Hawaiian 
Babies? . and "Let's All Be Americans 
Now" were his best songs. 

The one string violin solo and the fife 
solo by Lew. Hilton, with vocal accom- 
paniment by Miss Lazar and Mr. Kellan, 
was a big applause getter. 
.. The row over the "request., song"' was 
well worked up by Mr. Hilton on the stage 
and the leader, and Manager Falke. in the 
orchestra. The mechanical doll bit was 
Miss Seymour's allotment. 

The "Byes" song,, with, a dance by Miss 
Lazar and Mr. Hilton, stopped the show, 
xiind "Pretty Baby" Was a strong oppor- 
tunity for Miss Lazar to' do clever work. 

"Savo's juggling act, while showing noth- 
ing' new, held attention. ' both by the quick 
fire .handling of small objects and the chin 
balance of .the life size, prop horse. 



STARS TO AID NEWSBOYS ' 

.. Among .the stars who. will appear, at 
the .newsboys' benefit performance .at the 
Hippodrome Sunday evening, -.April 15, 
are: George M. Cohan, Walter Kelly, Sam 
Bernard, Leon Errol, Howard, Broa.j Grace 
La. Rue, Bock and White, Frank Tinncy, 
James J.. Corbett, Sam Harris, Anna 
Wheaton, Herbert Cpthrell, '.Dofaldina, 
Annette Kellernmn, Sophye Barnard, Joe 
Jackson, Arnaut Bros., John Philip Sousa, 
Irving Berlin, tho Jazz Band, -Jack Nor- 
worth, Henry dive, Raymond Hitchcock, 
Rialto Orchestra, Jack' Gardener, James 
O. Morton Co., Juliette,. Gertrude' Varider- 
bilt, Vera Michilena, Carl MeCullougli, 



AGENTS GET HEP 

COIN BIG MONEY QUICK 

Sell the most complete line of 

Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 

Knives are all made of best steel. Handles with the latest REAL ART, SEPTEMBER 
MORN, JESS WILLARD and other ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS. We want Agents in 
every city, and town. We manufacture our own Knives, and, therefore, we are not de- 
pendent on foreign supplies. We ship promptly. We are the largest Manufacturers 
and Distributors of Photo-Handled Knives for Sales and Raffle Cards in the United 
States. Write us and we will see that you are promptly supplied. Ask for catalog and 
terms today. Do not delay. 

WE ASSIGN YOU TERRITORY AND PROTECT YOU IN IT 
GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

212 No. Sheldon Street Dept. 54 Chicago, 111. 



MADISON'S BUDGET 

If -* /» A royal dollar's worth. Con- 

NA ID tpnts Include 12 original 
■W« *T monologues, 8 great acta for 
two malea and T for male and female, 
a bright Irian act for three people. 20 
SUre-flre parodies, * professional minstrel 
first-parts, a screaming; tabloid comedy, en* 
titled "Have Mercy. Judge"; also hundreds 
of nifty gaga and fanny sidewalk bits. 
Remember tbe price of MADISON'S BUD- 
GET No. IS la only ONE DOLLAR. JAKES 
MADISON, 105S Third Avenue, Hew York. 



Telephone 1577. Bryant 

M. Greenwald 



101 West 4Znd St_, Cor. Ctb 
Suite 41«. New York 



Ave, 



Muiic Set to Word* 

Manuscripts Corrected 

Arrangements of All Kinds 



For Yen Years Musical Editor of Led. 
Feast, lnc_ to- whom I refer. 



WANTED 

SOLO B FLAT CORNET PLAYER. Perms 
aent position la modern factory to the rieht 
man. Address THE ROBBINS * MYERS CO., 
Sprint-field. Q. 

AT LIBERTY 

Musical and Vocal Director (Piano). Wife 
chorus numbers and parts (medium). For 
musical comedy, stock or one piece . Just 
closed season of 33 weeks with Walter Orr's 
Million Dollar Doll. Address 

BILLINGS BOOTH 



«U N. MacDoweU St, 



Charlotte, N. C 



MILLER & KENT 

(LATE OF VAUDEVILLE) 
Bee t<> Announce that They Are Conduetinj 

SCHUUCH'S EXCLUSIVE SAMPLE STYLE SHOP 

Coats, Suitt, Dresses and Gowns 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

122 W. 44th STREET NEW YORK CITY 



THE ADELAIDE* 



HALF BLOCK FROM 
THE WHITE RATS 



Telepha 
Bryant MSsVMfl 

754-756 Eighth Ara., Be*. 46th and 47th Stsv, One Block Wert of 1 
J-4-S Roam Apartments, Comp lately Furnished far Housskseptn,-, Staam Hast, Bath, PnssM 
Strictly Professional MRS. GEO. H1ET.F.I . I 



FOR STYLE AND PRICE VTSIT THE 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 

A Trial Will Convince YOU 



J. FEIGENBAUM A FELIX YOUNG, Mare. 

Its W. 43th St, Suite W, New York 



Phona tM Bryant 



ALLIANCE HOTEL 

258 West 44th Street, New York City 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. « Seceeee from Broadway. Professional people will 

find here high-dais accommodations and service at reasonable prices. Tel. Bryant 



0/""\KJ/-^ WRITFR^ POEMS WANTED FOR PL'SLlCftTlUN, 

SvlNVJ VVnl I CnO , jKi( „- viL ... ( ., s iUKi-.os-ugiiw'ii 
PERFORMERS ROBT. H. "bRENNEN, 1433 Broadway, N. Y. 



1VEW HOTEL WARNER 

(EUROPEAN) 

Cottage Grove Avenue and 33rd Street, Chicago 

Telephone I>ouglsn 673 

F. BURT CARR, President and Manager 

(Formerly with Victoria,. Wellington sud Morrison Hotels) 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE DESIRED 



250 Outside Rooms, 
Weekly sod Pcnsu 



200 I'rlrate Bates, Rooms with Private Kalb. fl.00 per day ami upwards. Special 
FIREPROOF. EXCELLENT CAFE. POPULAR PBICES. 



Perhaps Marion Harris would be a big hit all over the Orpheum Circuit with any song. We don't care to argue the point, 
But the big thing to remember is that Marion Harris never got more out of a popular song— more "pep" 

' or more "rep"— than she's earning with 

I AIN'T GOT NOBODY MUCH 

(AND NOBODY CARES FOR ME) 

..•,•„.."... ■ .-.y. By ROGER GRAHAM and SPENCER WILLIAMS _. 

McKInley Music Co., Cohan's Grand Opera House Bldg., Chicago 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



MOTION PICTURES 



HOUDINI SIGNS 

FOR A SUBSEA 

MIRACLE 

TO ACT FOR WILLIAMSONS 



Hondini, the famous vaudevillian who 
liberates himself from shackles, tanks and 

sealed cells, haa entered a contract with 
the Williamson Brothers to perform mir- 
acles in subsea pictures. 

The announcement from the offices of 
the Williamson Brothers, who originated 
submarine motion pictures and have al- 
ready enriched the film indnstry with tre- 
mendous scenes from the floor of the 
ocean, describes the forthcoming Houdini 
film as the masterpiece of their record. 
The Belf-liberator is declared to have ob- 
tained the largest price ever paid to a 
film star for one production. 

A special story, involving the necessity 
of the hero extricating himself from ap- 
parently overwhelming enfetterments, 
fathoms below the sea surface, will be 
written by an author of national note. 

One of the particular things expected 
of Houdini in this film, will be to emerge 
from a steel tube resting sixty feet under 
water, without breaking the glass, two 
inches thick, that forms the window. 

Houdini expresses great enthusiasm 
over the project. He is confident, also, 
that he will not perish in the feat laid out 
for him. 



REFUSED TO SHOW CHAPLIN FILM 

Portland. He, April 8. — The suit of 
the Mutual Film Corp. against Abram 
Goodside for breach of contract was begun 
today in the Supreme Court. According 
to the plaintiff company, Goodside entered 
into a contract to lease twelve Charlie 
Chaplin films for exhibition in his the- 
atre but presented only two and refused to 
display the remaining ten contracted for. 

MOVIES FIND LOST BANKER 

Mobile, Ala., April 5. — William Me- 
Causland, the Baton Rouge banker who 
disappeared a year ago while hunting, is 
alive according to the life Insurance com- 
pany in which he carried policies of more 
than $100,000. As proof of its claim the 
insurance company has exhibited motion 
pictures of the supposed banker taking 
Hunting lessons in a Seattle music hall. 

FAIRBANKS CHOOSES LEAD 

Eileen Percy, who has been appearing 
in "The Century Girl," has been selected 
by Douglas Fairbanks to play the oppo- 
site lead to him in his second production 
for the Artcraft Pictures Corporation, en- 
titled, "A Regular Guy." Miss Percy will 
leave for the Coast the eud of this week 
to begin her initial screen work with Fair- 
banks. 



LOCKWOOD SIGNS WITH YORKE 

Harold Lockwood has signed a two- 
year contract with President Fred J. Bal- 
shofer, of the Yorke Film Corp, by the 
terms of which he will be starred in a 
number of Master features, unions which 
are "Under Handicap," "Paradise Garden" 
and "The Yellow Dove." 



DUDLEY FORBES SENTENCED 

Dudley Forbes, a film actor with the 
L-Ko Film Co., was sentenced last week 
to spend fifteen days in jail on the charge 
of speeding and driving an auto while 
intoxicated. 



RIALTO TO HAVE ANNIVERSARY 
The Rialto will celebrate its first anni- 
versary during the week of April 22, when 
the Douglas Fairbanks' picture, "In 
Again, Out Again," will be the feature. 



FAIRBANKS GOES WEST 

A farewell luncheon prior to his de- 
parture for the coast was tendered "Doug" 
Fairbanks, the screen actor, by the Art- 
craft Pictures Corporation in the Peacock 
Room at Murray's last Saturday. Be- 
sides the officials of the corporation, there 
were thirty-five representatives of vari- 
ous trade and daily newspapers present. 
A unique favor in the form of a "song 
primer' was given each guest by Pat V. 
Kyne, manager of Murray's. Fairbanks 
in his speech stated that these were all 
songs that he once knew but had almost 
forgotten. 

Fairbanks, accompanied by Benny Zeld- 
man, his personal publicity purveyor, left 
for San Francisco on the Twentieth Cen- 
tury Limited on Sunday afternoon. After 
a brief rest he anticipates beginning work 
on his second release. 



"WOMAN AND THE BEAST" SANE 
"The Woman and the Beast," a five-reel 
production of the Graphic Films, Godfrey 
building, New York, is described in ad- 
vance notices as one with a "sane plot." 
It is a state rights offering. 

Marie Shotwell, who starred in "En- 
lighten Thy Daughter" and "The Witching 
Hour," heads the cast. A husband who 
practices pacifism rigidly through his daily 
life, but who, in a pinch, exhibits the 
energy of a belligerent, provides the story. 



W1.1.W. BURKE SIGNS AGAIN 

Billie Burke has signed a two years' 
contract with the Famous Players-Lasky 
Corporation, and her first moving picture 
under this contract will be "The Mysterious 
Miss Terry," by Gelett Burgess. She will 
pose for the pictures during the summer 
and in the winter win appear on the 
regular stage in a new play under the di- 
rection of her husband and manager, F. 
Ziegfeld. Jr. 



LOVE FRACTURES ARM 

Montague Love, while acting before the 
camera last week, sustained a fractured 
arm which will lay him up for some time. 
The picture called for Love to be thrown 
downstairs by the "villain," and the . 
throwing was done so realistically that 
further work on the picture is suspended 
until Love has sufficiently recovered to 
use his arm. 



"NATURAL LAW" FOR MOVIES 

Charles Sumner's play "The Natural 
Law" is to be made into a feature mov- 
ing picture by the France Films Co. How- 
ard Hall, who created the part of Dr. 
Webster in the New York production of 
the piece, is to have the same role in the 
picture. 



TO PROGRAM BERNHARDT FILM 

It has been decided that "Mothers of 
France," the Sarah Bernhardt picture play 
recently purchased by World-Pictures 
Brady-Made, will not be released on the 
State rights plan. 



TO FILM WILCOX WORKS 

The Warner Brothers have just closed 
a contract for the exclusive film rights to 
the poems, books and writings of Ella 
Wheeler Wilcox. The deal involves an 
expenditure of $213,500. 



NAME NEW PICKFORD PICTURE 

"A Romance of the Redwoods" is the 
title of the new Mary Pickford picture, 
which she has just made in California 
under the direction of Cecil B. De Mille. 



TOM BRET WITH METRO 

Tom Bret, the motion picture play- 
wright, has joined the Metro -Rolf e scen- 
ario department. Until quite recently he 
had been with the Vitagraph Co. 



IRVING TAKES VACATION 

Director George Irving, of the Frohman 
Amusement Corp., has, by advice of his 
physician, left for California on a vaca- 
tion. 



G0LDWYN PLANS 

DISTRIBUTION 

SYSTEM 

SCHEME READY IN JULY 



Samuel Goldfish, president of the Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corp., announces that his 
corporation will own and operate its own 
distributing organization. The new enter- 
prise is arranging to open offices in the 
various cities near the center of zones in 
which distribution is -to be undertaken. 

The corporation expects to be ready to 
deal with exhibitors early in July. 

Since the beginning of its career last 
December, the corporation has been corre- 
sponding with exhibitors all over the coun- 
try, and soliciting suggestions from these 
showmen as to good methods of distribu- 
tion. Mr. Goldfish asserts in his latest an- 
nouncement that the replies were over- 
whelmingly in favor of a Goldwyn-owned 
distributing organization. Scores of expe- 
rienced operators in pictures have offered 
to buy franchises for regional rights or 
part ownership of territories. 

The aggregate of these offers is over 
$1,000,000, Mr. Goldfish sayB. 



JANE GREY AWARDED $5,233 

Jane Grey has been awarded a verdict 
of $5,233 in a suit brought for breach of 
contract against the Triumph Film Com- 
pany. Her contract, called tor a fifteen 
weeks' engagement at $500 per week. Dur- 
ing one of the' ' rehearsals she is said to 
have called Director' Golden a liar, where- 
upon she was arbitrarily dismissed from 
the cast. Nevertheless, the court decided 
in her. favor. She was represented in the 
action by O'Brien, . Malevinsky and Dris- 
coD. Max Stener appeared for the film 
company. 



GENERAL FILM CO. FOR CANADA 

The General Film Co. of Canada, Ltd., 
has been organized to distribute in Can- 
ada the same product handled by the Gen- 
eral Film Co. in the United States. Its 
headquarters will be in Montreal, with 
several branches throughout the Do- 
minion. The officers of the new company 
are T. A. Hubley, president; Harold Bol- 
ster, vice-president, and T. Coppelman, 
secretary and treasurer. All the business 
of the company will be transacted from 
the main office in Montreal. 



COLDWYN GETS STUDIO 

The Goldwyn Pictures Corp. on April 
2 took possession of the Universal Fort 
Lee studio and plant recently leased, and 
installed some of its producing units there. 
Aubrey M. Kennedy has been installed as 
manager. 



"JOAN" WINS IN BOSTON 
The "Joan the Woman" film had a tre- 
mendous reception at its premiere in Bos- 
ton Saturday. Miss Geraldine Farrar, 
star of the production, appeared in person. 



NEW FAIRBANKS FILM READY 

The first Douglas Fairbanks Artcraft 
picture, "In Again — Out Again," has been 
completed and will be released shortly. 



"CURSE OF EVE" ON WAY 

The Corona Cinema Co., of Los Angeles, 
announces it will give an early trade show- 
ing of "The CnVse of Eve." 



STEWART BACK TO UNIVERSAL 

Roy Stewart has returned to Universal 
City, and will appear in pictures under 
the direction of Jack Conway. 



MAE MURRAY SIGNS WITH LASKY 

Mae Murray has signed a contract with 
Jesse L. Laaty to appear in Lasky-Para-. 
mount pictures for the next two years. 



SUPPLY CO. ADDS TO HOLDINGS 

Montbeax, Can., April 7. — The Inde- 
pendent Film & Theatre Supply Co. is 
understood to have purchased the Canadian 
exchanges formerly handling the Metro 
films, but will use special features instead 
of the Metro productions. The company 
is controlled by G. H. Perkins, of this city, 
who has the Canadian agency for the Pow- 
ers and Simplex projection machines. 



FILM TITLE CHANGED 

The title of the new five-reel feature 
being made under the direction of Christie 

Cabane, with Francis X. Bnshman and 
Beverly Bayne in the stellar roles, has 
been, changed from "The Voice of One" 
to "Cyclone Higgins, D.D." Bushman is 
playing the part of a traveling evangelist. 

ERBOGRAPH HAS NEW STAR 

The Erbograph Film Company has a 
new leading woman in the person of 
Marion Swain, who is playing the part of 
"Sis" in "Little Miss Fortune." She is 
supported by Lncile Dorrington, as "Flossie 
Footlights" ; Bradley Barker, the heavy, 
''and Hugh Thompson, male lead 



MARY PICKFORD BACK 
Mary Pickford, accompanied by her 
mother and personal representative, Ed- 
ward Hemmer, arrived in New York from 
California last week. Her stay here has 
been brief, as she returns to the Coast 
to-day to resume her activities on the next 
Artcraft release. 



"TO-DAY" FOR PICTURES 

"To-Day," by George Broadhurst and 
Abraham Schomer, is to be produced in 
motion pictures. Florence. Reed. will have 
the leading role. Frank Mills, Leonore 
Harris, Gus Weinberg, Alice Gale and 
Kate Lester win also appear in the. screen 
adaptation. 



SCENARIO WRITER ARRESTED : 
Margaret Shaw, moving picture scenario 
writer, was arrested last week on a charge 
of grand larceny, on the complaint of a 
Mrs. Simon Alper, who accuses the 'girl 
of taking $1,350 worth of jewelry while 
employed by her in New Haven. 



RATH APOLLO SCENARIO EDITOR 

Fred Rath, a newspaper man, has been 
appointed scenario editor of Apollo Pic- 
tures, Inc., releasing on the Art Dramas 
program. Rath has just completed' the 
adaptation of "The Mystic Hour," which 
is to be released in May. 



WILLETTS JOINS ARROW FILMS 

Clarence Willetts, the theatrical man- 
ager, has joined the Arrow Film Corpora- 
tion as special representative, and is at 
present making a whirlwind tour of the 
South. He will return to New York with- 
in a few days. 



APOLLO SIGNS SAINPOUS 
John Sainpolis, for over seven years 
appearing in leading and star roles on the 
stage and screen, has been signed by 
Apollo Pictures Corporation to appear in 
features on the Art Dramas program. 

ILLINGTON FILM IN MAY 
Margaret Hlington will make her first 
appearance in pictures when the photo- 
play "Sacrifice," written for her by 
Charles Ken von. will be released by 
Lasky-Paramount in May. 



STARFIELD SUCCEEDS WOLFE I.- 
St. John, N. B., April 9. — S. Starfield 
has succeeded Jules H. Wolfe as resident 
manager for the Standard Film Service, 
Ltd. Wolfe resigned to go to New York. 



McCLURE MOVES OFFICE : ;'j 

MeClure Pictures, now releasing "Seven 

Deadly Sins," has moved its office from 
the MeClure - Building to the sixteenth 
.floor of the Berkeley Building at 25 West 
Forty-fourth Street. 



S- 



April 11. 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



NEWS 



REVIEWS 



STATE RIGHTS 



RE LEAS ES 
FORUM 



STATE RIGHTS TERRITORIES 

SPLIT UP BY BIG COMPANIES 

Districts Doubled and Tripled in Number, and Even Cities Desig- 
nated as Film Units — Frohman Amuse. Co., Cosmofotofilm, 
Backer, Warren and Others Indorse Plan 



State rights territory fell apart last week 

In revolutionary fashion under the onset 
of a half dozen tremendously big feature 
films offered with new marketing systems. 
A thorough redivision of the previously 
recognized film districts is under way 
through the operations of these late films, 
and State right districts have been doubled 
and tripled. .... 

Instead of fifteen general territories, as 
formerly, the United States now contains 
thirty or forty. Its parts probably will 
receive even greater ' subdivision, within 
the next few months. 

"God's Man," produced by the Froh- 
man Amusement Co. ; "The Manxman," 
produced by the Cosmofotofilm Corp. ; 
"The Sin Woman," by the George Backer 
Finn Co. ; and "The Warfare of the Flesh," 
by the Edward Warren Productions were 
the vanguard of films that wrought the 
disintegration of territories. 

The wrecking of precedents under the 
systems of these companies was revealed 
in statements by their officials that no 
territory now existent is permanent. 

It will be information of great satisfac- 
tion to state rights buyers to learn that 
the above-mentioned, and two or three 
other companies offering productions in the 
next few days, will split States in halves 
and quartern and even segregate cities for 
the exclusive film rights of individual 
operators. 

Brooklyn, henceforth, will be regarded 
as a separate film, territory. The rest of 
Greater New York even may be split. 

"Districts hereafter will be designated 
solely according, to the facilities and effi- 
ciency of the state rights buyers," declared 
Joseph Farnham, general manager of the 
Frohman Amusement Co. Mr. Farnham 
gave Ms views in the course of an inter- 
view particularly on the plan for market- 
ing "God's 'Man," which had its first trade 
showing in the Bialto last week. 

"We could have sold 'God's Man' for all 
of the United States and Canada within 
three hours after the showing," said Mr. 
Farnham, "if we had chosen to follow in 
the footsteps of precedent. The same 
operators who for years have been eon- 
trolling vast sections of the country were 
ready to take the film. Others were com- 
peting for sections. We have adopted the 
principle that there are no ironclad divi- 
sions of the country for Sun distribution. 
We shall be guided entirely by the dic- 
tates of efficiency, and are, therefore, hold- 
ing back the sale of rights and reducing 
territorial areas so that all capable opera- 
tors will have a fair chance. 

"We will not lease the picture to a man 
simply because he has $30,000 and the 
selfish wish to control three States. We 
will consider only well trained showmen as 
our clients, and will co-operate searchingly 
in mapping ont the size of territory he 
can efficiently handle."' 

Mr. Farnham mentioned how the ten 
southernmost States had been for years a 
territorial unit, and reviewed the changes 
that gradually divided this section into 
two or three units. He asserted that, so 
far as "God's Man" was concerned, this 
region would be further disintegrated. 

Mr. Farnham subscribes to- the belief 
that the city of Brooklyn should be con- 
sidered a separate territory. 

George Loane Tucker, production man- 
ager of the Oosmorbtofilm Corp., which of- 
fered "The Manxman" to the open market 
last week, also advocates and is helping 
in the redivision of territories. 

"The open market leasing method is the 



ideal distributing method," he declared. 
"Through this process each operator will 
give to a film the best energies and train- 
ing he possesses, in contrast to the perfunc- 
tory interest that a salaried employe 'work- 
ing for a program releasing company 'might 
give. 

"There should be no precedents and past 
geographical boundaries considered in 
mapping territories. The smaller they are 
in area, the. more efficiently will they be 
managed by the State rights buyer." 

Mr. Tucker's assertions on this score 
will set at rest many rumors that were 
current previous to the trade showing of 
"The Manxman" to the effect that this 
film would be sold outright to a big pro- 
gram distributor, to be handled as a super 
program feature through the program ex- 
changes. 

H. Z. Levine, manager of the Edward 
Warren production which is shortly to re- 
real "The Warfare of the Flesh" in a 
trade showing, is another staunch believer 
in territorial redivision. 

"We could have sold the rights for the 
whole country three times over, Bince the 
picture waa first announced for sale," he 
said, "but we are holding back to give the 



MANY NEW FILMS 
TO BE RELEASED 
ON STATE RIGHTS 

War themes will figure in the produc- 
tions of several state right film builders in 
the near future. The subject of prepared- 
ness and heavy-shelled combat already 
has procured exploitation in films released 
almost simultaneously with America's en- 
try into the world war. 

The Greene Feature Film Co. announces 
two fresh war pictures for the immediate 
future, which its sponsors declare will bo 
remarkable. They will be "The Fury of 
Civilization," and "America is Ready." 
They have the indorsement of Major Gen- 
eral Wood and Secretary of the Navy 
Daniels. 

The noteworthy offerings of last week 
will stand as top notchers in the open 
market for weeks to come. They include 
"Gdd's Man," produced by the Frohman 
Amusement Co.; "The Manxman," offered 
by the Cosmofotofilm Co., and "The Sin 
Woman," produced by the George Backer 
Film Co. 

"The Warfare of The Flesh," produced 
by the Edward Warren Co., and offered to 
the market two weeks ago, is enjoying 
wide discussion. It will have its first 
trade showing about April 17. 

"The Honor System, a super feature of 
the William Fox Co. which has been show- 
ing at the Lyric for several weeks, was 
offered to the open market last week. 

"The Woman and the Beast," produced 
by the Graphic Films, is announced as one 
of the latest offerings to the state rights 
market. 

The Popular Pictures. Corp. offers the 



entire field of legitimate buyers a chance." 

"The Warfare of the Flesh" will be ««SL2 W£ 72? j£. "2ft 

shown to the trade about April 16. It is 



an elaborate film with, an allegorical theme 
that required twelve weeks in the making. 
The scenes were taken in Florida, North 
Carolina and New York. It is said to 
have cost $200,000. 

The Paralta Plays Corp. promises fur- 
ther support to the redivisionists. Mr. 
Bates, publicity director, declares the 
Paralta system will absolutely revolution- 
ize the system of distribution. 

He announced a general plan by which 
cities will be appraised and blocked off 
into leasing districts. 

"The plan' will emancipate the exhibi- 
tors," said Mr. Bates. "It will guarantee 
moderate prices to the public and will 
wipe out waste." 

H, J. Shepard, manager of distribution 
for the George Backer Co., producers of 
"The Sin Woman," placed this company 
among those which will redlvide territories. 

"We are going to take the stste rights 
buyer's viewpoint," he said. "If a show- 
man, owning a chain of theatres in a cer- 
tain compact section wants to lease a film, 
instead- of renting it, we will deal with 
him. This will guarantee a good handling 
of our films, and will relieve the ex- 
hibitors of a heavy cost. After a chain 
man has shown a film in his own theatres, 
he can rent it to other theatres in his dis- 
trict and procure a big clear profit." 

The Backer Co. purposes to release 
about one picture a month. "The Sin 
Woman" has attracted a vast number of 
bids from buyers. 

George Backer, head of the company, is 
generally credited with being the originator 
of the scenic ideas used in this film, which 
are in many respects unique. 



The Princess of India," five reels; "The 
Kurglar and the lady," five reels; "The 
Little Orphan," five reels; "Ignorance," 
five reels. 

Following are other current and pend- 
ing releases: 

Exclusive Features, Inc.: Where is My 
Father!, seven reels. 

Jos. W. Farnham: Race Suicide, six 
reels; The' Awakening of Bess Morton, 
five reels. 

Friedman Enterprises: A Mormon Maid 
(Mae Murray), five reels. 

Frohman Amusement Corp.: Oct. 10. 
The Witching Hour, five reels. 

Germanic Official War Films:' Germany 
and Its Armies Today. 

Grand Feature Film Company: Rex 
Beach On the Spanish Main, five reels; 
Rex Beach in Pirate Haunts, five reels; 
Bex Beach in Footsteps of Ca.pt. Kidd, five 
reels. 

Harper Film Corporation: November 16. 
Civilization. 

Herald Film Corporation: Around the 
World in 80 Days, six reels. 

Hippodrome Film Co.: At the Front 
with the Allies. 

Eulee Features: Germany on the Firing 
Line, six reels; France on the Firing Line, 
six reels; The Unborn (Bessie Bondhill), 
five reels. 

C; Post Mason Enterprises: The Won- 
der City of the World, four reels. 

Moral Uplift Society of America: It 
May Be Your Daughter. 

B. S. Moss M. P. Corporation: The 
Power of Evil (Margaret Nichols), five 
reels; The Girl Who Doesn't Know, five 
reels. 

(Continued on Next Page.) 



TO STATE RIGHTS BUYERS 

The question of territorial boundaries for film operator* is one fraught 
with interest. What are the logical territories? What is the right basis of 
designating a film franchise region? The views of capable men are presented 
on this page. What do yon think of them? What are your views? 

The plan to organise state rights buyers is another burning topic to men 
in your field. What do you think of the plan? Write your ideas in a letter 

to The State Rights Forum of The New York Clipper. Helpful suggestions 
will be printed. Questions will be aniwered. A big producer will contribute 
am article on territorial rights in the next issue. 



STATE RIGHTERS 

ANDPR0DUCERS 

WANTLEAGUE 

CLEARING HOUSE PROPOSED 



A clearing house for State rights buy- 
ers is the latest project under discussion. 
Several makers of big feature films, and 
leading buyers in interviews with Tor 
Clipper this week, express enthusiasm 
over the idea. It was declared that an 
organization of territorial rights operators 
was actually germinating in the trade. 

It is proposed that the buyers would 
have a central headquarters in New York, 
with executive officers clothed with full 
power to negotiate for all members of 
the buyers' league. 

A committee of expert film appraisers 
would be maintained to inspect and pass 
on all films fixing an honest, equitable 

Erice for the productions. The clearing 
ouse would likely have separate offices 
for big buying companies and projection 
rooms. 

H. Z. Levine, manager of the Edward 
Warren Productions suggested several 
helpful details of the plan. He indorsed 
it in the highest terms. 

"That is what is needed vitally in tbe 
State rights field," said Mr. Levine. "A 
clearing house for the marketing and trade 
exhibition of big films would eliminate a 
vast amount of conflicting activity. An 

organization of operators in the business 
also wonld eliminate irresponsible adven- 
turers. 

The plan is to have tbe big producers 
organize into a sort of chamber of com- 
merce, with a common understanding of 
how to trade and with common facilities - 
for reaching and serving the scattered field 
of State rights buyers. It 'is purposed, as 
a supplementary part of this organisation, 
to weld tbe buyers into one body, operat- 
ing under helpful rules and under adequate 
protection. 

Joe Lee, a territorial buyer, is one of 
the advocates of the league. Mr. Lee com- 
mends tbe general theory in the highest 
terms. 

In an interview on the subject he de- 
scribed a dozen advantages the league 
would provide. He wished it known that 
he had not entered any definite movement 
to organize the fraternity, but was simply 
a well wisher who stood ready to give his 
support when the time came. 

Recent investigation has revealed that 
the State rights field has. been alive with 
gossip looking toward an organization. 

It is understood that "sucker money" is 
one of the biggest banes of tbe territorial 
buyer's life. "Sucker Money," wearing a 
fancy vest, smoking two cigars at one 
time and breezing in from Oiikaloosa, la., 
with a roll of bills, bas thrown many 
monkey wrenches into the machinery of 
open market trading in the past. 

Tbe possibility of a plumber with $30,- 
000 and with a vision of fortunes in films, 
buying a territorial franchise is being con- 
demned as a peril to the business. With 
an organization for the buyers, such fledg- 
ling speculators could be headed off. it is 
argued, for the good of their own souls 
and the safety of the business. 

Some large producers have voluntarily 
established a rule against selling to un- 
skilled individuals. They have found it is 
better business, as well as better ethics, 
to hold their productions for sale only to 
well trained showmen, who will come back 
for future business and will handle all 
tbey get properly, even though they won't 
pay as big money as others. 



GERMAN PRISONERS SHOWN 
Ten thousand German prisoners of war 
figure in various scenes of "Tbe Manxman." 
Tbe prisoners are those who were interned 
on the Isle of Man after tbe German de- 
feat at the battle of the Marne. 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, 1917 



MANY NEW FILMS COMING 

(Continued from page 35.) 

Paragon Films: The Whip, eight reels. 

Anti-Vice Film Company: Is Any Girl 
Safe?, five reels. 

Bernstein Film Productions: Who 
Knows?, five reels; The Seven Cardinal 
Virtues. 

Biograph Company: Her Condoned Sin, 
six reels. 

California Motion Picture Corp.: De- 
cember — The Passion Flower. 

Claridge Films, Inc.: The Birth of Char- 
acter, five reels; The Heart of New York, 
five reels. 

Cosmofotofilm Company: Incomparable 
Mistress Bellairs, four reels,- Liberty Hall, 
four reels; The Black Spot, four reels; 
Victoria Cross, four reels; O 18, four 
reek; His Vindication, five reels. 

Creative Film Corporation: The Girl 
Who Didn't Think (Jane Gail), six reels, 

Dixie Filing: Dec. — Tempest and Sun- 



shine, five reels; Dec. — Just a Song at 
Twilight, five reels. 

Donald C. Thompson Film Co.: War as 
it Really la, six reels. 

E. I. S. Motion Picture Corp.: Trooper 
44, five reels. 

E. & B. Jungle Film Company: Jungle 
Brats, Fowl Play, Discovered, When tile 
Clock Went Cuckoo, When Jones Went 
Wrong, Napoleon's Night Out, Circus 
Brides. 

Eskay Harris Feature Film: Alice in 
Wonderland, six reels. 

European Film Company: Fighting for 
Verdun, five reels. 

Private Feature Film: Ignorance, six 
reels. 

Radio Film Company: Satan' the De- 
stroyer of Humanity, seven reels. 

Ray Comedies: July — 12. Casey's Ser- 
vants; July — 19. Casey the White-Wing. 

Selig Special: Coming. The Garden of 
Allah (Selig), ten reels. 

Selznick: The Deemster (Greater N. V.), 
nine reels; Enlighten Thy Daughter 



(Greater N. Y^ seven reels; 20,000 
Leagues Under 'the Sea (Greater. N. Y-), 
ten reels. ; 

Sherman Elliot, Inc.; The Crisis, seven 
reels. 

Signet Film Corporation: Nov.— The 
Masque of Life, seven reels. 

Triumph Film Corporation: Dec — 5. 
The Libertine, six reels. 

Variety Films Corporation: My .Coun- 
try First, six reels; The Pursuing Ven- 
geance, five reels. 

Warner Brothers: Dec. — Robinson Cru- 
soe (Savage), five reels; Jan. — Are Pas- 
sions Inherited (Dorothy Farley and Wm. 
Conklin), seven reds. 



"DEEMSTER" TO OPEN SOON 

"The Deemster.'' a picture- taken from 
Hall Caine's novel of that name, will open 
a New York run in the Broadway Theatre 
April 15. This feature is offered to the 
state rights market by the Arrow Film 
Corp., Times building, New York. 



ADOPTS OPEN BOOKING ... 

The Triangle Film Corn, announces .it 
will henceforth produce one super-program 
feature a month for its regular program 
and give all-exhibitors the right to accept 
the offering or book any picture they 
choose from the open market. 

The exhibitor will not be compelled to 
pay the rental price of a program picture 
when he elects to rent one from the open 
market list. 

INCE BROTHERS FORM CO. 

Ralph and John Dace announce the for- 
mation of the Ince Productions, Inc., to 
produce - one feature a month. The new 
luce films will be distributed by the terri- 
torial franchise method. 



STATE RIGHTS WEEK 

This is state rights week in the mo- 
tion picture trade zone' of New York. 
Dozens of buyers are arriving in uncon- 
scious demonstration of Lent* s end, and as 
harbingers of the Spring picture rush. 





George Loane 

Tucker has 
directed some 

of the best 

money-getting 

features that 

have ever 

been made. 

His past 

performances 

are your 
guarantee for 

"The 
Manx-Man" 



□ 



George Loane Tucker 



Announces 



That offers are now invited 
for the United States and 
Canada, or any part thereof 

; - for ■■■■■■ .,•/. ^ ■■■>■ 



"The Manx- 







HALL CAINE 



Address all communications 
to. 



4Twc 



^mo§oto07n^ 

World's tower Bldg., IIO W. 40th Street 






If one person \ ^ 

in every ten *..'. 
who swear by 

Hall Gaine' 

and' his books, 

go to see 

this picture, 
"The 

Manx-Man" 

will make a 

fortune for 

Exhibitors! 



o 



April 11, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




"THE MANXMAN" 

Cosmof otofilm. Nine Seels. 

Xtate Rightg Release. 

■ y Cast. 

Kate Elizabeth Risdon 

Pete Fred Qrove* 

Philip .Henry Ainley 

•Story— Dramatic. Adapted from Hall 
Caine's novel of the some name. Pro- 
duced on the Isle of Man by George 
Loane Tucker. 

Action— Intensely interesting. \ 

Continuity— Always consistent. 

Suspense — Gripping; . 
Detail— Correct. 
Atmosphere— Convincing. 

Photography — Superlatively excellent. 

Remarks. 

"The Manxman," which was given, a 
special showing last Thursday morning 
At the Lyric Theatre, is such a superla- 
tively good photodrama that an adequate 
And just description of it is difficult. 

The story follows the novel of - Hall 
Caine very faithfully, beginning at the 
childhood days of Pete, Philip and Kate. 
Then it shows them less than twenty 
years afterward passing through the days 
of love, marriage and intrigue, until, at 
-the close, Pete divorces his wife and leaves 
the island that she and Philip may marry. 
. Caine's novel- has always ranked as one 
of the moat powerful and human stories 
of the eternal triangle and has been put 
on the screen in a masterly way. The 
showing takes a trifle more than two 
JiourH, but holds the interest every min- 
-ute of the time. 

Box Office Value. 

Should prove one of the strongest draw- 
ing cards among photodrama features. 



"GOD'S MAN** 

Frohman Amuse. Corp. Mine Seels. 

State'e Rights Release. 

Cast 

Arnold L'Hommedieu, "God's Man," 

H. B. Warner 

Richard L'Hommedieu Albert Tavemier 

Bertie Barbara Castieton 

Eunice Barbara Qilroy 

Archie Hariogensis . Harry ■ Eytinge 

■Carol Caton Marion Fouche 

Hvgo WaXdemar ....Walter Biers 

John Waldemar William Fredericks 

Bobbie Betty Bcttoirs 

The P.hiUuopher Tom Burroughs 

Story — Dramatic. Adapted from novel by 
Geo. Branson Howard. Scenario- by 
Anthony P. Kelly. Directed by George 
Irving. Featuring H. B. Warner. 

Action— Interesting. 

Continuity— Consistent. 

Suspense— Well sustained. 

Detail— O. K. 

Atmosphere — Convincing. 

Photography— Excellent. 

' Remarks. 

In "God's Man" Mr. Howard tells a 
most human story, depicting man's weak- 
nesses and what they frequently lead him 
to; and that no matter how low a moral 
level he has reached, he can lift himself 
up again if, in the beginning, he is a man. 

The story .is always interesting and 
sometimes even gripping in its suspense, 
and has been excellently put on the 
screen. It is capitally acted by Mr. War- 
ner and his associates and splendidly di- 
rected. To sum it up, "God's Man" is a 
feature film in all that the name implies 
and should appeal to any audience. 

Box Office Value. 

Should be a tremendous attraction. 



AT LAST— THE SERIAL SUPERLATIVE 

"THE TWISTED THREAD" 

By H. M. HORKHEIMER 
STARRING 

KATHLEEN CLIFFORD 

SOON READY FOR RELEASE 
Produced by 

BALBOA 

(To. Hew* of Serials) 

HORKHEIMER BROTHERS 
Stake Their Reputation on the Assertion That 

"THE TWISTED THREAD" 

Will Surpass Every Previous Continued Screen Story in the Film World. 

Past or Present 



STORY 



PRODUCTION 



STAR 



ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS will bo forfeited to Charity if a Board of Re- 
view, representing the Motion Picture Press, does not substantiate this claim 



EXHIBITORS 

WILL ALSO BE INTERESTED TO HEAR THAT MORE OF THE FAMOUS, CUNNING 

"LITTLE MARY SUNSHINE PICTURE PLAYS" 

WILL SOON BE RELEASED BY BALBOA 

The. Balboa Amusement Producing Company 



H. M. HORKHEIMER E. D. HORKHEIMER 

Pmidant and Ganoral Manasar SKtMaqt •ad Tiimiii 

Studio & General Offices Long Beach, CaL 
H. N. Hold*, Eastern Ropras ont a tf vo, 1600 Broadway, Now York City. 





SOLE AND ONLY DIRECTOR OF '"IRE BARRIER" 

Announces 
An original photo-play by Anthony P. Kelly 



THE BAR SINISTER 



)• A 



-'■>>?.< 



*£* 



A private showing will be given 
s» at the 

BROADWAY THEATRE. , , 

at 10 o'clock^ Wednesday morning. April 18th, 1917. 



.... 



' ** ' i .A, 



A cordtaL invitation is extended to the Press, Exhibitors and Motion 

Picture People 



KjF*' -f 



World rights sold to FRANK G. HALL. 



Distributors; ABRAMS & WERNER, Candler BIdg. 



38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 11, HUT 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"THE BOND BETWEEN" 

Pallas. Five Reels. 

Released April 2 by Paramount. 

Cast. 

Pierre Duval : George Beban 

Han* von Ateuerinck John Burton 

Foole Zelnar Wigel de Brullier 

Carl Riminoss Paul Wcigel 

Jacques Duval Colin Chase 

Raoul Vaum Eugene Pattetle 

John Fownes IF. H. Bainbridge 

Ellen Ingram Vola Tale 

M. Lorillard Signor Buzzi 

Mmc. Lorillard Mrs. Buehler 

Story — Dramatic. Written by George Be- 
ban. Directed by Donald Crisp. Fea- 
turing George Bebnn. 
Action — Rambling. 
Continuity — Broken . 
Suspense — Lacking. 
Detail— Good. 

Atmosphere — Not always convincing. 
Photography — ^Excellent. 

Remarks. 

"The Bond Between" has a good idea to 
start with, but the story is poorly con- 
structed and the picture has been directed 
faultily. Ah a consequence, rambling ac- 
tion and broken continuity make continued 
interest out of the question. 

The story deals with art thieves, who 
divide their time between smuggling valu- 
able paintings into tbe country and steal- 
ing them from art galleries. Through a 
chain of circumstances. Jacques Duval is 
suspected and his father, Pierre, to save 
his son. says he is guilty. Jacques falls 
in love with u young woman detective, El- 
len Ingram, who is on the case, and. when 
she finally brings the thieves to justice, 
Ellen and Jacques agree to marry. 

Mr. Beban is hot seen at his best as 
Pierre. He has long been acknowledged 
an excellent actor, but in this film his work 
is not always convincing. The supporting 
company, in the main, is good. 



"DARKEST RUSSIA" 

World. Five Seels. 

Relented April 23. 

Cast. 

llda liarosky Alice Brady 

Alexia Nazimoff John Bowers 

Constantine Karischeff. .J. Herbert Frank 

Ivan Barosky Sorbert Wicki 

Barosky Boris Kortin 

Count Paul "Nazimoff Jack Drumier 

Xieholai Herbert Barring ton 

Katherine Karischeff Kate Lester 

Otga Lillian Cook 

Grand Duke Frank De Vernon 

Story — From the play by H. Grattan Don- 
nelly and Sidney R. Ellis. Directed by 
Travers Vale. Camera work by Max 
Schneider. 

Action — Rapid. 

Continuity — Even. 

Suspense— Su stained. 

Detail— Well handled. 

Atmosphere — Good. 

Photography — Efficient. 

Remarks. 

Alice Brady, as Ildn Barosky, the 
Jewish girl whose father is slain by Rus- 
sian soldiers, and whose hatred of the rul- 
ing class conflicts with her love for a noble 
member of this class, rises to high emo- 
tional heights. 

Olga Karischeff, loved by I Ma's brother, 
a Nihilist, likewise -p>rtrays effectively 
the part of a girl whose heart is bruised 
by the hideous twists of fate. 

There is a fine dramatic trick enacted 
when Karischeff, as minister of the in- 
terior, deposed for failure to abolish 
Nihilism, instigated by his cruel wife, em- 
ploys the last ten minutes of his term in 
office to sentence Alexis and llda to ten 
years in Siberia. As the minute hand, in 
a close up, creeps close to 12, Nazimoff 
appears ou the scene and pleads for hta 
son. When the hand strikes 12, Nazimoff, 




himself, becomes police chief and in turn 
consigns Olga, the daughter of his prede- 
cessor to an identical sentence. 

Miss Brady displays great, emotional 
power during the scene when, as violinist 
at the grand reception at the Nazimon 
palace, she discovers Alexis is betrothed to 
another, and when she is flogged for refus- 
ing to play "God Save the Czar." 
Box Office Valve. 

Two nights. 



V-L-S-E TAKES ON NEW STAFF 

The Vitagrftph-V-If-8-E enters this 
week into an era of intensified advertising, 
under the direction of a reorganized staff. 
The new acquisitions include Paul N.. 
Lazarus, manager of the advertising divi- 
sion ; Nat' S.. Stronge, manager general 
publicity division : Gordon Laurence, ed- 
itor of Vitagraph Exhibitor; Fred Sebaefcr, 
manager newspaper and magazine divi- 
sion. 



U 



Unanimously Proclaimed an Epoch 

GEORGE BRONSON HOWARD'S 

GOD'S MAN 



9f 



WITH 



H. B. WARNER 

3,500 people crowded the Rialto Theatre on Wednesday morn- 
ing last and with one accord placed their stamp of approval on 
"God's Man" as 

THE 

GREATEST MOTION PICTURE PROD UCTION OF THE AGE 

Read What the Critic* Write 



"Tlie Frohman Amusement Corporation's pie- 
turlzatlon of George Branson Howard's .... 
novel stands, as tbe moat Intense dramatic 
picture of extra recla of both recent and dis- 
tant date." 

Peter Milne In MOTION PICTURE NEWS. 



" 'God's Man' la an ambitious photoplay deal- 
Ing with an ambitious story. There la no 
denying the eftectlveueati and UlKli qualllv of 

both." 

Tom Kennedy Id EXHIBITOR'S TRADC 
REVIEW. 



"The moat atrlaing photoplay of n modern 
story I have ever seen." 

A>u> Smith In MORNING TIMOR APH. 



"Forcefully hnman and effectively truthful." 

"WTD." 



"One of the most beautifully staged, well 
acted and effectively produced pictures tbat 
has ever been shown." 

Uarrlette Underbill In M. Y. TRIBUNE. 



" 'God's Man' should set a new pac* lo Mm 
dom." 

■J. B. Edwards In THE BILLBOARD. 



' 'God's Man' will prorc a winner." 
Adam Hull Shirk In DRAMATIC MIRROR. 



"A masterful production. An unusual tbeine 

given an unusual treatment." . . 

C. W. Graven In M0T00RAPHY. 



"I consider 'God's Man' one of tbe three or 
four really great ■ pictures which have been 
produced. . . . Many pictures have all the 
qualities of sreatneas except story. 'God'» 
Man' baa all tbat the others have, pins 
story." • __^ 

8. M Welter in N. T. REVIEW. 



"A feature Dim In all that the name Im- 
plies." 

B. C. Wblttmi In N. T. CLIPPER. 

"Stiiiiendons: gripping; vital: sn appeal to 
everyone'* heart." 

Klalui* Ivans In EXHIBITOR'S HERALD. 



" 'God'a Man' will be more tban a nine days' 
wonder. Tbe Anlab comes- all too soon." 

M. R. Loewenthal In V. Y. STAR. 



" 'God'a Man' . . . .'will be one of the moat 
popular Dims of the present day." 

X. T. JOURNAL OF COMMERCE. 



Territorial Booking Privileges Now Being Allotted 

j 

The Frohman Amusement Corporation 



WILLIAM L. SHERRH1-. President 



18 EAST 41ST STREET, NEW YORK CITV 



us^-Ss»^i*rs£a»^ii^^ 




WILLI AlVf A. BRADY 

In Association with 

WORLD PICTURES 

Presents 

Carlyle Blackwell 

Anal 

June Elvidge 

"The Page Mystery" 



With Arthur Ashley 
Directed by H arl ey K noles 



April 11. 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



39 




QUICK 



Deliveries of Costumes, Tights and Wigs 
We are Manufacturers mlit^'"^^^ 



Our Rental Dssjeltussnt fwtilBi Over ***** €■» ■— i 
NOW READY 1 Jack We>W. Minatrel Joko Book 
No. I. Ali| Hit. 25c Postpaid 
Wo carry four complate Unas* cf Mahay Up 

CHICAGO COSTDME WORKS g^ %£&.*£ CHICAGO, D. S. A. 
FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book* for home 
amuerment, Negro Plays, Paper, Scenery. Mr*. Jarley'e Wax 
Work*. Catalogue Free I Free! Free) 

SAMUEL FRENCH, a Waat tttfa St, Naw York 



PLAYS 



^ACR OF THE NAME 

^IttSTTlIrm^RBUItT 




TAYLOR'S 

No. 2 

CIRCUS 

SPECIAL 

TRUNK 

This trunk baa 
Improvements 
that wilt b a 
sure to Interest 
you. Guaran- 
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able and will give service (or a good 

many yean. 

Send for full particular* and our NETW 
1917 CATALOGUE. 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

S7I N. Halataat St, Chicago, 1U. 
tig W. 441k St, Naw York. N. Y. 






OFFICIAL M \7 A 
DOCTOR IN. V. A. 

Dr. William H. Goldberg 

233 WEST Slrd STREET 
Tel. SUI Schuyler NEW YORK 



rii. .in- Lenox 0077 

A. SCHROTTM AN 

117 Emit T7th St.. Naw York 
Theatrical Upholsterer 

Recommended by all leading tbeatres. Be- 
upholatcrlng and repairing tbestre cbalrs a 
specialty — Slip Covers for Summer. 



Hartsdale Canine Cemetery 

INTERMENT FOR ANIMALS 

Office, II* Wast ZSth St., Now York City 

Telephone 9809— Farragut. 

Illustrated Catalogue mailed upon request 



Telephone 3360 Bryant. 

Hydro Electric Baths 

Candler Bid*., 

220 West 42d St. Room 505 

Tonic Bath, Sl.OO. Inspection solicited. 
Hours for men, 10 s. m. to 8 p. m. 
^ Ladles by appoi ntment. 

LmiLLER 



Satm slippers in stock m 
all colors . Entrrp compatv 
tes fitted to 24 hours. 
fiwiyStage aadStsoet Ao* 
r«pmwn«»tis satisfied here 



155-1 BUUfly 



1 l I — /~*e~* HIGH-GRADE 
nCaOD MAKE-UP 

IfSBO BY fMI OTAM FOR »» VIAM. 
ON I*li AT THI LIAOINO DRWO, 
COtTUUl. HAIR AND OIPARTMINT 
■TORU THROUaHOUT TH« UNITtSO 

•lAIgg AND CANADA. AT POPULAR 




Phone Bryant 4632 

BOrsJaFAIMXI 

SCHOOL OF DANCING 

Mme. Da Fonteny Inatntctor 
Associated 20 years with the Metropolitan 
Ballet. All styles of dancing taught for the 
stage. Classic and Vaudeville! alao Too 
dancing. 

Special instruction to chorui of new pro- 
ducticna. ISS9 Broadway, New York 

DON LENO wiu prepare you for stage 
■ T,,, ""* , "''uil screen. Classes con- 
stantly forming. We guarantee positions to 
Xraduates free. All branches of Dancing and 
cling taught. Reasonable rates. 144 Waat 
44th Street. Naw York. Bryant 1194. 




TIGHTS 



Cotton TlcbU. 
pair 90c. 



Worsted Turhts, 



medium weight, $2.00 a pair. 
Wonted Tujhu, heavy welxht, 
$2.75 a pair. Import*! auk 
plaited tfcbts. In brlfbt In] and 
solden Brown, only $3.00 a 
pair. SllkoUne Turhts in an 
colors. $2.00 a pair. Heavy TO 
pw cent. Imported alia tlrhta. 
In hriiht red only, ndaced fraai 
$6.00 to $t.oo a pair, run 
sleeve Shirts ts match tsghtm 
aame priea aa tUrhta. orders 
filled promptly Clipper Catalog 
free on application. 

BERNARD MANDL 

210-212 W. MADISON 8T. CHICAfil, ILL 



B B & B Special 

Wardrobe Trunk 

( Ply Fibre Overeat 

Chicago: Mar a ball Field A Co. $45.00 

Send for Catalogue 
B B A B TRUNK CO, Pittstwra. Pa. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS. ETC 

N. Y. PLAY BUREAU, Tre- 
mont Theatre. N. Y. City. 



Stamp for catalog. 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any alee up to 11x20 feet. 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colore. 
$2.00 deposit with each order. 
Studio. Columbus. O. 



CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus. Rolling Globes. Clubs. Batons, 
Guns, Wire Walkers* Apparatus and Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK. 
Cincinnati. O 

NOW READY 

THE | CLIPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 
It contains toe name a and addreaaea of Man- 
agers, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agents in New 
York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia. Pitt. 
burgh, San Francisco. Canada: afualc Pub 
Habere i Theatrical Club a and Societies: Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c stamp, accom- 
panied by a coupon cut from THE NSW 
YORK CLIPPER. 



Thi Mass CO., RocHssvae. N.T. 



CUT OUT AND 

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AND DATE BOOK 
(For 1*14-1*17) 

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SCRIPTS: Sfe «fc <£-£k g 

Bita $5. List for atamp. Typewriters. Blicka 
like new. $10, caeca included. Coronaa, etc 
H. J. ASHTON. $17 N. CUrk St, CaJcmgo. 

St.. Provld.no.. R. L 



New Victoria Hotel 

IN NEW YORK ^n"acre*swaj5 
145 to 155 West 47th Street 

The Very Heart of New Yewfc" 

ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

3S0 ROOMS 280 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Modes* Caaeveaieaca Faripssss Plsua Exclusively 



ABE MIERS, Manager of Cafe Drop in at any time 

Single rooms, hot and cold water It 

Single rooms, private hath $1 Je and up 

Suits, parlor, bedroom and bath $4 and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 bedrooma and hath Bsadm 

The Beat 50c. Dinner in New York 

C A. HOLLINGSWORTH Now York City 





Othrrs Succeed. Wby Can't Too? 

STAGE TRAINING 

Drtna, Canity, Vsadtvllls, Stags Dane- 
ins sni Photo flay Taarht. Technical 
and Practical Courses. CtlrbrtUrs woo 
studied under Mr. AVrlene: Annette Ket- 
lermann. Nora Bsyn. Uaiel Dtwn, 
Joseph Santlry. Barry Pllcer. Mile. 
Daale. Mary Puller. Doll; Slaters. Taylor 
Holmes. VIDsd Presoott, Eleanor Painter 
and others. Write for catalogue men- 
tioning study desired. 

Alviene Theatre School of Actrng 

57th Sc. at Broadway 

Entrance 225 W. 57th St. New Tork. 



SECOND-HAND 



G O WN S 



ANDREWS, 506 S. State St., CHICAGO 



WIGS a>d BEARDS 

In All Stylos and Qualities 

THEATRICAL JEWELRY AND 
SPANGLES, TIGHTS, OPERA HOSE 
AND STOCKINGS, FANCY BRO- 
CADES, VELVETS, SATINS, COLD 
and SILVER TRIMMINGS, ana -11 
Goods Theatrical. 

High Grade Qualities at Lowest Prices 

CATALOGUES and SAMPLES upon re- 
quest. When aaking for Catalogue, 
please mention what goods are wanted. 

S1EGMAN & WEIL 

S. W. Cor. 27th St. * Madison Ave. 

NEW YORK 

The) Theumtricad Supply Emporium 



TONIGHT BILLS 



One Bids Two Sides 



5,000 4112 Toolihters $5.00 

10.000 til 2 Tonlxhters 8.00 

15.000 4il2 Tonlxhters 10.50 

20,000 4x12 Tonlfbters 12.50 

30,000 4x12 Tonlxhters 17.50 

(6x9 sue lame price as 4x12 In quantities 
above stated) 

5.000 3x8 Tonbjhters 4.50 

10.000 3xB Tonlfhtera 7.50 

15,000 3i8 Tonithtert 9.00 

20.000 3x8 Toolchters 11.00 

30.000 3x8 Tonlfhtera 15.00 

(On orders of 80.000 and over of Tonight Bills, either 
one, two, three or six different styles, evenly chrldecl. 
may be had at no additional coat. One-side TDolebters 
havlne- on then the cast and synopsis of plays will bs 
chirred for it the two-aide rate.) For other theatrical 
printing lend for price list louts book, samples, tic. 
10c In stamps. Oaring to unsettled market cessa ti o n s al l 
prices subject to change without notke. THE CA7.ETTE 
SHOW PIIITII6 CO., ■ansae, missis. Terms-. Ctsk 
with order. 



$7.00 
10.50 
13.50 
16.50 
20.00 



6.00 

9. SO 

12.00 

14.50 

17.50 



RWORLO F-ArtOUS sfWS 
LDING ORGANS 
ics-r ON SALC aaal 



SrikeWavnaac 
rm. Mention this paper. 

BILHORN BROS. 



$10.^ 



-.SIT 

IS«.W,LA»<.C f»T 

CMiCAOO.iiA on*. 




Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQMN'S 

6th Awn, hot. 27th and 28th Sta., N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC UP.sLtslA.IL 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

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issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

CHEWING GUM-BALL-CANDY COATED 

Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factonea Bldg.. 
Toledo. O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L Boyd, Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St., 
Chicago. _ _. ... 

E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, BL 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 

I has. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 

Howard Tuttle, HI Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581 583-585 South High St., Columbus, O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wm. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS, LAMPS 

(Bought, Sold) 

Newton Art Works, 305 W. 15th St, New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C. Goss Co.. 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mick. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co.. 387 Waahington St., Bos- 
ton, Masa. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St., Boston, 

""THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 

E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton, 455 W. 33d St., N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobaon, 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 



JOHN A. WALSH 

Writer of the Cleverest in Vaudeville, Songs, 
Sketches, Monologs, Patter. Will. Point, T. 



Reliable Prolcsalonal 
FRANCIS X. BENNESSY 

Irlab Pipcr-»8ectrh Piper— Irish 8tep Dsn- 
cer — Scotch ntni Daocrr— Violinist lalu- 
drfenl — Teacher — Play Parte. Aienla keep 
this address: 522 Sestet Ars., »se York. 




WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH A CO. 
II* N. Ninth St, PhMsAesgahle 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Dress, Taxedo sad Prince Albert Salts 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St.. Chicago 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written to 
aong poems. W. H. NELSON. Aator Theatre 
Bldg., 1S31 Broadway, N. Y. 

Telephone. Lenox 7197. 

WM. CHARLES L. EVANS 

DRUM SHOP 

Earsta Foldioi Psial. Drsns Rnttd aa* Sets. 
160 EAST 841k ST.. KM Y0 IK. 

lMPORTANT^EVERETT J.. EVANS. Com- 
poser-Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music for new authors, and assists publication. 
Send your poema or complete songs. Eatah. 
1900. Suite 505. Astor Theatre Bldg., 45th and 
Broadway. N. V. 



WIGS 



Huaan Hair. Irk*, Date*, km. fas. 



Catakj, Pres. rspw Haas . 
IWmloes. Prees eajPWBW 
IS OjOPaT Bg. ft T. 



TBK TSCHHICAl- ntStg. StW V0BK 



HE 




K 



LI 



ROY 



MARY 



RICE-WERNER 



A Comedy Blackface Sensation 



a 



ON THE SCAFFOLD 



W 



17 Minutes of Screams H 

Direction— ARTHUR KLEIN [IBy BLANCHE MERRILL 

:-: Fully Protected In :-: 

Washington-Variety-Star 



■d 



. 



+-n 




&7ie NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 

i 111 in ill in iu tij. ni in m i» mi m ui m m m 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



HERE IT IS BOYS! 

THE SONG THAT PUTS RHYTHM IN YOUR FEET 

The Greatest Cheerful "Gang Song" Since "Hot Time In The Old Town" 
ALREADY ACCEPTED AS THE AMERICAN TIPPER ARY! 

Go To It Now! A Punch In Every Line! 




Words by HOWARD JOHNSON 



Music by PERCY WENRICH 



Here's the Chorus. What a Marvelous Inspiring March Melody! Send for your 

copy immediately. Plenty of extra verses 



AIN'T IT THE TRUTH? 

"You can't go wrong with any 

'Feist' song"! 



CHORUS 

Where do we go from here boys, where do we go from here? 
Anywhere from Harlem to a Jersey City Pier. 
When Pat would spy a pretty girl, he'd whisper in her ear, 
Oh joy, Oh boy, where do we go from here. 



MORE EVIDENCE 

"If you sing a 'Fci»t' song 

you'll be a stage hit!" 



' (dtjiuc do /fr-£ 'jfr jfa?H<. a£<l^ 



<3JL*w*> 



^ * ttUAjtdt bU tfo iw* litis If*?* ^trfcuttte &-e fo y^n ; 




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Copyright 1917 by Leo Feist, Inc. 



BOSTON 
181 TREMONT ST. 

PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD and CHERRY STS. 



, Inc. 

135 W. 44th St, NEW YORK 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE B'L'D'G. 



ST. LOUIS 
7th and OLIVE ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PANTAGES THEATRE Bldg. 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 



1853 



NEW YORK, APRIL 18, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-No. 11 
Price, Ten Cents 

L- 



WHITE RATS MAY LOSE 
CLUB H OUSE FU RNISHINGS 

Holder of $5,000 Chattel Mortgage Demands Judgment, Already 

Month Overdue, Tomorrow; Meeting Held to Devise 
L Means of Raising Money and Saving Situation .*•.-•. 



With the strike of the White Rats 
against the Vaudeville Managers' Protec- 
tive Association declared off, the organiza- 
tion is now facing new difficulties, for 
unless $5,000 is obtained to raise the 
chattel mortgage on the clubhouse furnish- 
ings, held by Jacob J. Lubel, of 1229 Park 
Avenue, by tomorrow the property will be 
removed from the clubhouse in satisfaction 
of the deed tendered by Harry Mountford 
at the time the loan was granted, accord- 
ing to Mr. Lubell. 

The mortgage was made by Harry 
Mountford as president of the White Rats 
Realty Co., on December 10, 1916, and was 
to become due on March 10, last. The sum 
of $6,000 and interest was to have been 
paid over then. 

But, as the White Rata were in the 
midst of their strike at that time they 
explained to Lubell that they had the 
money but needed it for their work in 
carrying on the campaign and asked for 
an extension of thirty, days. 

After a long conference, at which Fred- 
erick Zorn, attorney for Lubell was pres- 
ent, it was finally decided to extend the 
time of the loan for another month, or 
until April 10. At that time, Lubell in- 
formed the White Rats representatives 
that he would not grant a further exten- 
sion under any circumstances. 

When the announcement was made that 
the strike had been called off Lubell got 
into touch with the White Rata and told 
them that he would have to get his money 
on the day it was due or Us attorney 
would take measures to foreclose the 
mortgage. A plea was made for a further 
extension of time but Lubell was reluctant 
to listen. 

On Monday a representative of the 
White Rata attempted to get Lubell to 
delay the proceedings for a few days, but 
he proved obdurate and informed the party 
that he had placed the matter in the hands 
of Zorn for action. 

The mortgage which was given covers 
practically all of the furnishings in the 
clubhouse, including beds, mattreBses, bar- 
ber chairs, typewriters, cashier's desk, pool 
and billiard tables, racks, cues office fix- 
tures and liquor and wines. 

A clause in the mortgage states that 
should the amount of liquor on hand 
diminish to less than $1,000 in valne the 
mortgage becomes due immediately. 

A provision made in the mortgage is 
that if the mortgagee is compelled to fore- 
close, that he have the privelege of the 
use of the building for thirty days, to re- 
arrange the furniture and fixtures for sales 
purposes. 

A meeting was held in the clubhouse 
last night which lasted until the early 
hours of this morning. At the meeting 
the matter of meeting the present con- 
tingency was taken up, but nothing could 
be ascertained as to what course will be 
taken by the organization. 

Both Mountford and Fitzpatrick were 
not about the clubhouse as frequently as 



WANT FIELD TO HEAD ELKS 

Sooth Bend, Ind., April 9. — There ia 
a movement on foot to have Al. Q. Field, 
the well-known minstrel man, make a 
race for the office of Grand Exalted 
Ruler of the B. P. O. Elks, In spite of 
the fact that Mr. Field has intimated he 
will not run. The ball was started roll- 
ing last Saturday night when the AL G. 
Field Minstrels played the Bncklen Thea- 
tre here and hla friends are pledged to 
urge hla nomination and election. 



usual during the past few days. It waa 
stated that Fitzpatrick was out of town 
and that Mountford was busy about the 
city. 

It waa stated at the clubhouse that, with 
the calling off of the strike, there would 
be no further "assessment levy" on per- 
formers' salaries, and that members would 
only be obligated to pay their regular dues 
in the future. 

This evening a benefit originally ar- 
ranged for the strike fund, prior to the 
suspension of the strike will be held in 
Webster hall. Twenty White Rata acts 
are scheduled to appear at thin perform- 
ance. 

The calling off of the strike was made 
at a closed meeting of the White Rate. 
Harry Mountford announced to the mem- 
bers assembled that the strike of their 
organization against the members of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Protective Associa- 
tion had been abandoned, temporarily, on 
account of the war. He stated that this 
decision had been reached at a special 
meeting of the International Board which 
was held at midnight on Monday. He 
stated that a wire was sent to President 
Wilson and Samuel Gompers, president 
of the American Federation of Labor, with 
which body the White Rata are affiliated, 
early on Tuesday morning, telling them 
of the action of the international board. - 
The contents of the wire, which were in 
the form of resolutions, were passed at the 
meeting. It stated that, as the United 
States was at war, it was the duty of 
every citizen to see that our country is 
not divided by factional or civic strife of 
any character whatever, so that the full 
effort of all may be devoted to bring the 
war to a successful conclusion. Therefore, 
it was the duty of any component part of 
the organizations affiliated with the 
American Federation of Labor, to suspend 
any factional differences or dispute which 
they may have at such a time, as waa 
promised by Samuel Gompers, "at a meet- 
ing of the National Defense Council re- 
cently. 

The message stated that the Rats were 
conducting a strike against sixty theatres 
in various parts of the country in conse- 
quence of a lockout ordered by the Vaude- 
ville Managers' Protective Association 
against its members. So, therefore, on 
account of the present crisis the White 
Rats were willing to release their mem- 
bers for such service as the nation may 
require, that they would have time to 
devote their undivided energies to the de- 
fense of their country. And for this rea- 
son, the message declared, the organiza- 
tion would suspend this strike until the 
country is again at' peace, and that the 
organization would pledge its undivided 
support in every possible way to Presi- 
dent Wilson and the country. 

When Mountford was Been after the 
announcement he was asked whether he 
had used the present difficulties of the 
country as a subterfuge to end the strike. 
He replied that the message sent to the 
President told the whole story. 



CENTURY TO CLOSE 28TH 
The Century Theatre will close its sea- 
son with "The Century Girl" a week from 
Saturday. The production will not be sent 
on the road as it was designed for the 
Century and no adequate acommodations 
could be found for it in other theatres 
outside of New York. With the closing 
of the theatre there will be two perform- 
ances on The Cocoanut Grove. The first 
performance is scheduled to begin at 
9 p. m. 

ZIEGFELD WINS SUIT 
On Monday in the Supreme Court, Jus- 
tice Edward R. Finch granted Flo Zeig- 
feld, Jr., a permanent injunction against 
the Columbia Amusement Co. and The 
Harry Hastings Amusement Co. restrain- 
ing them from using the title "Midnight 
Frolic" or "Midnight Frolics," or any 
simulation, or imitation thereof, in any 
play or advertising matter. 

ROSENBERG RE-LEASES SAVOY 

Walter Rosenberg on Monday renewed 
the lease on the Savoy Theatre with the 
T. D. Sullivan estate. He will 'remodel 
the house, by removing the stage, which 
faces thirty-third street, and substituting 
an entrance in its place. The seating 
capacity of the house will also be enlarged. 
Only six hundred natrons are accom- 
modated now with seats. 



GRACE ARMOND DEAD 

Houston, Tex.. April 15.— Grace Ar- 
mond, creator of "Foeliah Lizzie." who 
died here on Thursday, was buried today. 
A number of theatrical people were pres- 
ent at the services. Miss Armond recently 
came here from Chicago for the purpose 
of recovering her health. She bad retired 
from the stage two yean ago. 

HARTFORD THEATRE SOLD 

Hartford, Conn., April 14. — The Hart- 
ford Theatre, a vaudeville and picture 

house for twenty years, under the direction 

of H. H. Jennings, has been added to the 
chain of theatres operated by the Gold- 
stein brothers of New England. Fred 
Dean, after six years' absence, returns as 
manager. 



NEW HOUSE FOR NORWORTH 

Thomas GUlen, of the Fitzgerald Build- 
ing, has just completed a deal with Jack 
Norwortb, the comedian, by which he will 
build a house costing $30,000 for him at 
Seagate. It is to be ready for occupancy 
this Summer. 



VOGEL HAS NEW MINSTREL 

Chicago, April 16. — Al. Tint, the 
yodellng minstrel, has signed contracts 
with John Vogel's Minstrels for next sea- 
son to open July 25. 



WELLS HAWKS A LIEUTENANT 

Wells Hawks has been commissioned a 
lieutenant in the United States Navy Re- 
serve Force. 



VAUDEVILLE 

TO FIGHT 

CABARETS 

SCHEFF REVUE ROUSES MANAGERS 

What will probably develop into a fight 
between vaudeville managers and booking 
officials on the one hand and cabaret 
owners and managers on the other, has 
assumed serious proportions with the 
rumor that Keith's Palace Theatre man- 
agement has declared the Palais Royal "an 
opposition house" and with the further 
rumor that the United Booking Offices will 
frown upon acts that play the Palais 
Royal in the future. 

Indications that a fight between vaude- 
ville and cabaret managers waa in the 
air were first noticeable when the Palais 
Royal management announced their plana 
several weeks ago. At that time, the man- 
agement announced that it would create 
a new era in the cabaret world with the 
opening of its rendevouB and, as a first 
indication of making good their boast, an- 
nounced that they had engaged Fritzi 
Scheff as their feature, at a salary of 
$1,600 a week. Hardly had this been an- 
nounced when they began dickering with 
prominent big time acts to contract to 
appear at the place and rumors are mani- 
fold to the effect that several acts were 
hauled before officials of the United Book- 
ing Offices and told that if they accepted 
the engagement, further vaudeville book- 
ings in their theatres would be scarce as 
hen's teeth. 

It has been argued by the vaudeville 
managers that an elaborate cabaret, such 
as the Palais Boyal planned would be a 
serious menace to the vaudeville business. 
When one can see a big time vaudeville 
show for the price of his meal, he is less 
likely to frequent the variety houses, they 
argue. If such a policy aa the Palais 
Royal has instituted should be taken up 
by other cabarets, it would undoubtedly 
deal the hardest kind of a blow to the 

vaudeville houses, and, therefore, vaude- 
ville heads will probably take a decided 
and firm stand against these elaborate 
cabarets, fighting to keep the theatre and 
the cafe separate and distinct. 

With the opening of the Palais Royal 
on Monday night, a program of vaudeville 
headliners made up the roster of enter- 
tainers. All have been engaged for a 
period of eight weeks, which is the length 
of the Fritzi Scheff engagement. Two 
shows will be given nightly. At the comple- 
tion of the eight weeks. Manager Salvin, 
of the Palais Royal, states that a new 
program, every bit as ambitious and 
elaborate, will be presented. 

The present program is said to have 
cost in the neighborhood of $40,000. The 
weekly salaries average more than $4,200. 

Besides Fritzi Scheff and her chorus of 
twelve, others on the bill at the Palais 
Royal are Evelyn Cavanaugh, Richard 
Dore, Alfred Latell, Gene Green, Walter 
Ford, Helen Gladings, Harold West, The 
Four Entertainers, La Sylphe, Cynthia 
Perot, John Murray Anderson, and Santly 
and Norton. 

Hickaon, Lee Lash and other names 
found on the Winter Garden and Follies 
programs have supplied the costumes and 
special scenery. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



PENN. CENSORS 

TO BAN WAR 

FILMS 

EXPECT OTHER STATES TO FOLLOW 

Harbisbuhg. Pa., April 16. — It is likely 
that, within the next few days, the exhi- 
bition of motion pictures having any bear- 
ing whatever on the subject of war will be 
tabooed in this State. The State Depart- 
ment of Public Safety, acting on ordera 
said to have emanated from Washington, 
baa issued instructions to exhibitors ad- 
vising them to refrain from booking any 
of the so-called war or peace films in the 
future. They were also told that if they 
had any war film bookings within the near 
future, they should immediately cancel 
them, for their license would be revoked 
in case they attempted to play them. 

It is most likely that "Civilization" will 
be the hardest bit by this ruling. This 
film *■»■ been doing tremendous business 
throughout the State, four prints being in 
daily use. The houses which have played 
the film have done a big business. 

It is understood here that Pennsylvania 
will not be the only State affected by this 
ruling but that other States will follow 
■nit npon the direction of Government 
authorities and order the films bearing on 
this subject barred from their territory. 

"Civilization" depicts the horrors of war 
In a most vivid manner, showing the rou- 
tine of the submarine attack and other 
operations during battle. It is believed 
that the showing of pictures of this type 
would deter persons from enlisting in 
either of the government branches of arms 
during the present war with Germany. 

Other films that are being presented in 
thia State which will also fall under the 
ban of the State Department of Public 
Safety are "The Birth of a Nation." "The 
Battle Cry of Peace," and "The Fall of a 
Nation" besides a large number of less 
spectacular productions. 

Notices will be sent to the various ex- 
changes throughout the State to remove 
from their programs any film, the subject 
theme of which has any reference to war 
or ita horrors. 

Since the breaking off of diplomatic re- 
lations with Germany, the demand for war 
subject features has far exceeded that of 
the supply. More than one hundred and 
fifty different foot and five-reel feature 
films have been distributed in this State 
and the rental fee has been doubled over 
that of normal times. Some of the ex- 
changes took off their shelves films that 
have not seen service except on special oc- 
casion in the last four to five years. They 
have been obtaining from $25 to $50 a day 
rental for them. 

Pennsylvania has been noted for its 
rigid censorship laws throughout the coun- 
try, the State Board consisting of three 
people having ordered revisions of almost 
every film that has been submitted to them 
for their approval. A large number of 
films were rejected on account of titles 
which implied sensationalism or reference 
to sex. 

Several of the producers of films have 
fought the censors in the State courts, but 
were never able to overcome them. 

It is quite likely that "War Brides," 
"Womanhood," "Patria." and a number of 
other serials will also be banned. 

It is understood that the first action to 
be taken wffl be that toward "war" scenes 
from the battlefronts abroad. Under no 
circumstances will these films be allowed 
to be shown in the State. 

Pennsylvania has been considered a very 
lucrative field for the state rights buyer 
and large sums of money have been paid 
for films to be used in this territory. Ac- 
cording to the order of the State Depart- 
ment of Safety the owners of these films 
will probably lose a considerable amount 
of money through having to suspend opera- 
tions. 

Word was received here from Pittsburgh 
that Theodore Cosman, proprietor of a 
theatre in that city, was nearly killed by 



a mob while attempting to distribute hand- 
bills advertising "The Battle Cry of Peace" 
in his theatre. 

Cosman was arrested and held in $5,000 
bail for trial The police charged that the 
hand bills were being circulated for the 
purpose of preventing enlistment. 



SNEEZE CANCELS ACT 

Last Wednesday afternoon, while 
George M. Fisher and company, in a new 
playlet, "The Alimony Dodger," were ap- 
proaching the final situation of the act, 
the drummer in the pit sneezed twice and, 
as a result, the audience laughed, which 
incensed Fisher considerably and caused 
him to order the curtain rung down be- 
fore the end of the turn. At first the 
audience thought that it was a plant 
"sneeze," but when Fisher refused to an- 
swer a curtain call they saw that some- 
thing had happened.. 

Managing Director A. L. Shakman im- 
mediately went back stage to ascertain 
the reason. After a lengthy argument 
with Fisher he cancelled the act. Fisher 
told him that his lines were broken up 
by the drummer "sneezing" and the audi- 
ence laughing. Another act replaced 
Fisher on the evening bill. 

GEORCIE WHITE TO PRODUCE 

At the conclusion of the present engage- 
ment of White and Cavanaugh, which is 
only a matter of a few weeks, the partner- 
ship of this vaudeville team will terminate, 
and Georgie White will busy himself pro- 
ducing "Odds and Ends of 1917," which 
will open the now Norworth Theatre. He 
will probably take part in the piece as 
well. Lucille Cavanaugh has come to no 
definite conclusion as to her future plans. 



AUTHORS SUE TO 

GET MUSIC 

FEE 



BENEFIT FOR KATHRYN EVANS 

Chicago, April 13.— "Hazel Kirke" 
will be given by the Hull-House Players 
for four performances April 26, 26, 28 
and 20, as a benefit for Mrs. Kathryn 
Evans, an old time professional, who for 
several years has been a beneficiary of 
the Actor's Fund. She now desires to go 
to the Episcopal Old People's Home and 
the proceeds of these performances will 
pay for her admission. 



STAGE UNION HEAD RESIGNS 

Martin C. Higgins, for the past two 
years assistant to Chas. O. Shay, Inter- 
national president of the International 
Alliance of theatrical Stage Employees, 
resigned bis position last week. He was 
succeeded by Chas. Crickmore, of Seattle, 
Wash., who was formerly Western District 
organizer. 



JAZZ ACT FOR EMMA CARUS 

Emma Cams and Larry Comer have 
come to a parting of the ways, and Miss 
Cams will reappear in vaudeville the week 
after next with the jazz band now em- 
ployed at Reisenweber'a. Miss Carus plans 
to head a musical tabloid next season. 
What Comer will do now is not yet de- 
cided. 



nix action against cabaret 



START WORK ON NEW HOUSE 

Work was actually commenced on the 
new theatre which Edward F. Rush is 
building on West Forty-eighth Street to 
be known as The Stuyvesant. A gang 
of wreckers went at the houses that now 
occupy the site on Monday and will Boon 
have them out of the way. 

MANTELL PLAYS SHYLOCK 

Robert Mantell began on Monday night 
a two weeks' season of Shakespearean 
repertoire at the 44th Street Theatre, 
opening in "The Merchant of Venice" with 
himself as Shylock. 

ROSE MELVILLE REVIVES "SIS" 

TXHBE IIaute, Ind., April 12. — Rose 
Melville, who has not appeared here for 
many years, except in pictures, will ap- 
pear here April 29 in her old success "Sis 
Hopkins." 

MOULAN RETURNS TO BROADWAY 

Frank Moulan is back on Broadway, 
after completing an engagement with the 
Bainbridge Light Opera Co. in Minne- 
apolis. 



The first of the suits to be brought by 
the Society of Composers, Authors and 
Publishers to enforce the license fee au- 
thorized by the United States Supreme 
Court for the use of copyright dramatic 
or musical works in public performances 
for profit was commenced in the United 
States District Court last week by Nathan 
Burkan, attorney for John L. Golden and 
Raymond Hubbell, respectively author 
and composer of "Poor Butterfly," against . 
Gene Sennett, who conducts a cabaret in 
the Bronx 

In the papers filed in the District Court 
Clerk's office, a temporary injunction is 
asked restraining Sennett from having 
the number sung or played in his estab- 
lishment, before the trial for damages and 
the recovery of a penalty of $10 a per- 
formance for the use of the composition, 
is held. Judge Julius Mayer will hear the 
argument for the injunction on Friday 
morning. 

In the complaint the plaintiffs maintain 
they are the only persons who have the 
right to allow the public performance of 
this composition, according to the copy- 
right law, and that the defendant did not 
ask their permission to use the number. 

Should Judge Mayer grant the injunc- 
tion a number of other suits will be 
brought against persons refusing to pay 
a license fee to the American Society of 
Authors, Composers and Publishers for 
the use of this and other compositions. 

G. Schirmer, Inc., at a conference held 
with the representatives of the Motion 
Picture Exhibitors' League last Friday 
afternoon, agreed to allow the use of all 
of their music in the motion picture 
houses of Greater New York without the 
payment of a license fee. This concern 
controls from 2,500 to 3,000 pieces of copy- 
righted music. 

This meeting was arranged by the ex- 
hibitors with Mr. Schirmer after their or- 
ganization had held a meeting last week 
and decided that it would not pay a 
"license fee" to the Authors, Composers 
and Publishers' Society for the "perform- 
ing or playing rights of musical compo- 
sitions rendered by their house orchestras. 
The society had placed a license fee of 
$00 annually on all motion picture houses. 

The Schirmer concern is not a member 
of the American Society of Authors, Com- 
posers and Publishers, and, therefore, 
would not have received any share of the 
license fee collected by that organization. 
Those who were present at the conference 
on behalf of the exhibitors are Samuel 
H. Trigger, president of the Manhattan 
local; J. Robert Rubin, counsel for the 
exhibitors; Stanley Law ton, musical di- 
rector for the Ji. S. Moss theatres; Mr. 
Schirmer and his attorney, William Klein. 
A conference in relation to the matter 
was held with Carl Fischer, the music 
publisher, who is not a member of the 
American Society, and he also granted the 
picture people the privilege of using any 
of his published works without the pay- 
ment of a license fee. The J. P. Franklin 
Music Publishing Company also notified 
the exhibitors that they could use any of 
their material without the payment of a 
fee. 

The three concerns above mentioned 
control more than 7,000 pieces of copy- 
right music, and the exhibitors feel that 
they can get along with this material for 
some time to come without having to use 
any of the compositions which the Ameri- 
can Society of Authors, Composers and 
Publishers claim as subject to a license 
fee. 



ALIMONY FOR ANNA LLOYD 

Justice Pendleton, in the Supreme Court 
last week granted Mrs. Anna Walton, pro- 
fessionally known as Anna Lloyd, $40 a 
week alimony, pending trial in the di- 
vorce proceedings instituted against her 
husband, Harold Walton, a real estate 
dealer of Boston. He allowed James Boyd 
Potter, Mrs. Walton's attorney, $50 coun- 
sel fee. 

Anna Lloyd was well known on the 
musical comedy stage prior to her mar- 
riage to Walton, a son of "Plunger" Wal- 
ton, owner of the Hotel Walton, Philadel- 
phia, and other hostelries. They were 
married in Chicago July 17, 1010, and 
Mrs. Walton retired from the stage. In 
December, 1916, Mrs. Walton instituted an 
action for absolute divorce against her 
husband naming a manicurist in a* well- 
known hotel as the corespondent. Since 
their -separation Mrs. Walton has returned 
to the stage doing a single vaudeville act. 
The couple have one child, Harold Walton, 
Jr., aged five years, who is living with 
his mother. 



ALAN EDWARDS MADE CAPTAIN 

Alan Edwards, of the "Love o' Mike" 
Co., last week passed an examination for 
a commission in the Quartermaster Re- 
serve Corps and has been appointed a cap- 
tain. 



MOVIE UNION MEN SHOT 

Chicago, 111., April 15. — Three men 
rushed into the offices of the Moving Pic- 
ture Operators' Union here yesterday and 
shot Joe Armstrong, its president, and Ed- 
ward Collier, its secretary-treasurer. The 
wounded men do not know the identity of 
their assailants. Neither were they 
recognized by other men who were in the 
office at the time. 

The Moving Picture Operators' Union, 
Local 110 of the International Alliance of 
Theatrical Stage Employes, has been en- 
gaged in a jurisdictional fight with another 
moving picture operator's union, affiliated 
with the International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers, for some time. 



"SMART SET" CHANGES TITLE 

T. L. Corwell, for eight years manager 
of Whitney & Tutt's "Smart Set" com- 
pany, announces that, owing .to the num- 
erous companies which have been playing 
under the title of "Smart Set," this or- ' 
ganization will in the future be known as 
Whitney & Tutt's "Smarter Set." This 
title, also "Smartest Set," is fully protect- 
ed by copyright, and any infringement 
will be prosecuted to the full extent of 
the law. 



STANLEY IS EXPANDING 

Philadelphia, April 14. — The Stanley 
Co., of which Stanley V. Mastbanm is 
managing director, has secured a lease of 
the Imperial Theatre, in West Philadel- 
phia. This company has also purchased 
the Empress Theatre in Manayunk, a sub- 
urb of this city. The houses will con- 
tinue to show motion pictures. 



BENEFIT FOR EMPLOYES 

The box office staff of the Standard 
Theatre will be tendered a benefit next 
Monday evening when the management of 
the house will donate its share of the re- 
ceipts to them. The attraction in the 
theatre for the occasion win be Taylor 
Holmes in "Bunker Bean." Clarence Ja- 
cobson is treasurer of the theatre. 



GREENWOOD SELLS AGENCY 

Att.anta, Ga., April 8. — The Virginia- 
Carolina Managers' Circuit has purchased 
from George B. Greenwood, the Green- 
wood Theatrical Agency, which he. has 
conducted for nearly twenty years. _ Joe 
Speigelberg will be general manager' and 
the headquarters of the agency will re- 
main in this city. 



BERT SHEPPARD RETURNS 

Bert Sheppard returned to New York 
last week, after a stay of more than three 
months abroad. With the exception of a 
two weeks' engagement in Paris and a 
week in Birmingham he played the halls 
in and around London. 



NEW STARS AT GROVE 

Betty and Gertrude Hamilton, stars of 
both Klttw and Erlanger and Shnbert pro- 
ductions, have been engaged for the sum- 
mer at the Cocoanut Grove, entering the 
performance Monday night. , 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



MANAGERS HELP 

NAVY TO GET 

RECRUITS 

AID IN SWELLING ENLISTMENTS 



With their usual alacrity in response to 
a call for aid, theatrical managers through- 
out the country are giving active co-op- 
eration to the U. S. Navy Department in 
its publicity campaign for recruits. Full 
page display advertisements appear in 
many of the programs and souvenir books, 
and pictures depicting the training life of 
a man in Uncle Sam's Navy are exhibited 
in theatre lobbies and in picture houses 
are thrown on the screen. 

Through the courtesy of Charles Dilling- 
ham, a recruiting station has been opened 
at the Hippodrome, where liberal displays 
of posters are made. Joseph Mayer, pub- 
lisher of the programmes of the Barnum 
and Bailey and Ringling Brothers' cir- 
cuses has contributed valuable advertising 
space. Martin Beck has given liberal space 
to pictorial advertising in all of the pro- 
grammes of the Orphenm Circuit. 

In Chicago, through the efforts of H. J. 
Ridings, manager of Cohan's Grand Opera 
House, and George A. Kingsbury, man- 
ager of the "Turn to the Bight" Com- 
pany, full page advertisements have been 
arranged in all of the leading theatre pro- 
lamines, with attractive displays calling 
foe recruits for the Navy. S. L. Roth- 
apfel, managing director of the Itialto 
Theatre, keeps up a strenuous campaign as 
does also Marcus Loew in all of his 
theatres throughout the country. 

Other managements which have extended 
this patriotic aid to Commander Bennett, 
TJ. S. Navy, Officer in Charge of the D. S. 
Navy Publicity Bureau, New York City, 
are John O. Flinn, general representative 
for Famous Players-Lasky ; Ben C. Schul- 
bcrg, general manager, Paramount Pic- 
tures; Morris Gest, Will A. Page, Harry 
Jordan, manager, Keith's Theatre, Phila- 
delphia; J. S. McSween, of McCarthy .* 
McSween, managers Chestnut Street Opera 
House, Philadelphia; William Moore 
Patch, managing director, Pitt Theatre, 
Pittsburgh; Charles E. Ford, Ford's 
Opera House, Baltimore; Eugene Con- 
nolly; general representative Harry Davis, 
Pittsburgh; WiUard Holcomb, represent- 
ative J. K. Hackett; Joseph M. Howard, 
Gayety Theatre, Philadelphia; H. A. 
Henkel, Academy of Music, Baltimore; 
Kohn and Pollock, Gayety Theatre, Balti- 
more; Charles G. Strakosch, manager 
Walnut Street Theatre, Philadelphia. 

Through the courtesy of Edward Zeigler, 
administrative secretary of the. Metropoli- 
tan Opera Co., the boards of the Metro- 
politan Opera House, New York, have 
been made available. 

Marcus Loew has offered the lobbies of 
his extensive chain of theatres for recruit- 
ing stations. At all of these houses he is 
showing slides encouraging enlistments. 

At the last meeting of the Bill Posters' 
Onion, New York Local, a resolution was 
passed assuring the U. S. Navy Publicity 
Bureau of all the willingness of all its 
members to post and put out, without 
charge, any matter pertaining to recruiting 
for the Navy. 



AMSTERDAM HOUSE OPENS 

Amsterdam, N. Y., April 16.— The New 
Rial to Theatre, playing vaudeville and 
feature photoplays, gave its initial per- 
formance here to-night. The house is the 
largest in the city, seating 2,000 persona 
and was built at a cost of $250,000 by Ed- 
ward Klapp who also operates the Lyceum 
Theatre, a vaudeville house, and the Re- 
gent, a large motion picture house in this 
city. The lower floor seats 1,200 persons 
and the upper floor 800 people. 

The bill presented consisted of The Five 
De Koch Troupe, Marion Sanders, "The 
Yellow Peril," The World Comedy Four 
and the girl act, "From Coney Island to 
The North Pole." F. X. Breymaier is 
manager and Walter Plimmer is booking 
the new house. 



FLORENCE ROCKWELL RETURNING 

Sydney, Australia, April 16. — Florence 
Rockwell, the American vaudeville star, at 
the conclusion of her engagement on May 
12, will depart for San Francisco. She 
expects to resume her tour of the vaude- 
ville circuits upon her return to the 
United States. 



MACK AND BENNETT WITH TAB. 

Mack and Bennett, The Maid and the 
Tooth Pick, axe playing Greenwood time in 
the South with Jerrell'a Jubilee Girls. 



INTERNATIONAL TO PLAY ON 

The International Circuit has not set 
any definite date for the closing of their 
present season. Houses will be Kept open 
just as long as business will warrant 
their doing so. Several, however, are. to 
close in the near future, among which 
are the Lexington, New York, which will 
conclude its season with "Come Back to 
Erin," Saturday night. The Orpbeum, 
Philadelphia, will close a week from 
Saturday with the same attraction. The 
Majestic, Buffalo, will close April 28, with 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," and the Auditorium, 
Baltimore, will close on Saturday night 
with "Hans and Fritz," as the last attrac- 
tion. ■ 



RONAN WITH MFG. CO. 

Decatur, 111., April 14. — Thos. P. 
Ronan, for a number of years manager of 
the Powers' Theatre, here, is now with 
the H. Mueller Mfg. Co., in the general 
offices. Mr. Ronan was manager at the 
time the Powers' Theatre burned. He is 
known by all of the traveling managers, 
circus executive staffs and all of the big 
producing managers of New York city. 
He went direct to New York and booked 
many of the attractions that played the 
old Powers' Theatre. 



"DAWN OF ROSE" OPENING 

Chicago,' April 14. — Thomas K. Litch 
and Jack Curry have a singing and danc- 
ing act, which is opening in vaudeville in 
Chicago Heights this week, entitled "The 
Dawn of the Rose." The company is 
made up of nine girls and a man, and 
carries stage carpenter and electrician. 
Thomas K. Litch is manager and Jack 
Curry, carpenter. CharleB B. Huston is 
electrician. 



NEW THEATRE FOR FLUSHING 

FX.UBHTNO, L. I., April 16. — For the site 
of the largest Long Island theatre, a 
Broadway plot of land has been sold to 
Wilmer and Vincent, valued at $150,000. 
It includes the Flushing Hotel. A theatre 
to seat 3,000 persons will be built on the 
site, and also stores and apartments. The 
plot has 63,280 square feet. 



NEW THEATRE FOR SAN DIEGO 

San Diego, Cal., April 14. — Ground has 
been broken in the new Spreckels Bank 
block, in Coronado, for a new, . up-to-date, 
high class motion picture theatre. The 
house will be managed by the Messrs. 
Bush in conjunction with the Broadway 
and Superba. 



NIXON HAS PNEUMONIA 

riui^ADFjj-iiiA, April 16. — Samuel F. 
Nixon, the veteran theatrical manager 
and senior member of the Nixon and 
Zimmerman theatrical firm is confined to 
his home with an attack of pneumonia. 



GEORGE SACKETT PROMOTED 

Milwadkee, Wis., April 15. — George 
Sackett, formerly manager of the Des 
Moines Orpbeum, has been promoted and 
is now managing the Majestic Theatre 
here. 



HENRY BELLET TO MARRY 

Henry Bellet, owner of the vaudeville 
act, "The New Producer," will marry Rose 
Midler on Sunday next. 



OSCAR GRAHAM CLOSING 

Oxford, Kan., April 16. — Oscar Graham 
and company will close their season of 
thirty-three weeks April - 23 at Peabody, 
Kan. 



BELASCO-WOODS 

PLAY SUIT 

STARTS 

BOTH CLAIM WTLLARD MACK 



Ex-Judge Lacombe, acting as referee, 
started hearings last week in the suit 
brought by A. H. Woods against - David 
Belasco and Willard Mack, to restrain the 
former from producing a play of the North- 
west entitled, "The Tiger Rose," which, 
Woods charges, was written by Mack. 

Among those who have testified during 
the course of the hearing were A. H. 
Woods, Martin Herman, Frederick Mc- 
Kay, David Belasco, Marjorie Rambean, 
John Morosco, Willard Mack and the 
mother of Miss Rambeau. 

In his testimony, Woods stated that 
Mack is still under contract to him. He 
declared that he had complied with every 
request Mack had made of him and that 
he had not sanctioned the signing of any 
contract with Belasco. He said that he 
had accepted four plays from Mack, of 
which only one, "Kick In," was a money 
maker, and stated that he had paid over 
$31,000 to Mack. Martin Herman, a 
brother of Mr. Woods, corroborated bis 
testimony. 

John Morosco, author of "Alias Santa 
Claus," stated that Mack bad written the 
dramatic version of his book. He stated 
that he had visited Mr. Wood and informed 
him of this fact and that the latter told 
him that he would attempt to restrain 
Belasco from further producing the play. 

Marjorie Rambeau, who in private life 
is Mrs. Mack, testified that Mr. Belasco 
called at her home to offer her an engage- 
ment in a play called "The Czarina," and 
also a part in "The Indestructible Wife," 
and during that visit, he had informed her 
that Mack had written a play of the North 
West. Her mother testified along the same 
lines as Miss Rambeau. 

During his testimony Mr. Belasco said 
that he had "The Tiger Rose" in mind 
several years ago, as it embodied ideas 
suited to the talents of Blanche Bates, 
whom he intended starring in It. However, 
he finally decided that it was' not the 
proper vehicle for her and let the matter 
lay in abeyance until his new star, 
Leonora TJlrich came along. He found, 
then, that the story would fit Miss Ulricb 
and started work on the dramatization of 
the theme. 

He stated that when the play was being 
written, be had communicated bis ideas 
to Mack and that the latter did the actual 
writing, compounding dialogue and cre- 
ating characters. While this was being 
done, be and Mack edited the work as 
it proceeded, Mr. Belasco stated. 

Upon a qnestion from Louis Yorhaus 
referring to the authorship of the play, Mr. 
Belasco stated that he had the play copy- 
righted subsequent to the start of -the 
present suit and that he and Mack ap- 
peared as co-authors. He denied the alle- 
gation of Miss Rambeau regarding having 
told her that Mack was sole author of the 
play. 

With reference to the "Alias Santa 
Claus" play, in which Mack recently ap- 
peared, Mr. Belasco, upon cross-exami- 
nation by Mr. Yorhaus, admitted that 
Mack was the sole author of the play. 

When questioned as to whether he knew 
if Mack was bound to Woods by a con- 
tract, Mr. Belasco stated that he had re- 
ceived a letter from Woods in May, 1916, 
stating this fact, but that he had paid no 
attention to it and really considered it 
"impertinent" of Woods to write any such 
letter. 

Judge Lacombe then ruled that, in hav- 
ing admitted receiving the letter, Mr. 
Belasco was bound to respect the contract, 
and that, in his decision, be would hold 
that the fact of having received the letter 
was the same as if the contract between 
Woods and Mack were on the desk before 
him. 



WILL PLAY SUMMER RESORTS 

Arrangements are now being made for 
a tour of the Summer resorts of "The Ar- 
rival of Kitty," which will open May 25 In 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. The company will 
include Jean Barnard, Clara Levine, Wil- 
liam Blaisdell, Elsie Burt, William Me- 
han, Grace Alore, Ann Ives and Lloyd 
Neal, and will visit the principal resorts of 
the Adirondack**, St. Lawrence River, 
Green and White Mountains and Atlantic 
Seaboard. 



CONN ACQUIRES THEATRE 

Manchester, N. H., April IS. — The 
Eagle Theatre, one of Manchester's lead- 
ing motion picture houses, formerly con- 
trolled by a local syndicate, has passed 
into the management of Capt. Jacob Conn, 
of Concord, who recently secured a five- 
year lease of the property. Mr. Conn also 
has houses in Concord and Providence. 



1NTERNL TRYING NEW HOUSE 

The International Circuit will have two 
of their shows play the North Star Thea- 
tre, One Hundred and Sixth Street and 
Fifth Avenue, for a week each beginning 
next Monday to determine whether the 
house would be a suitable acquisition for 
the circuit next season. The first attrac- 
tion will be "Mutt and Jeff." 



DORIS KENYON 

Doris Kenyon, whose picture adorns the 
front cover of The Clipper this week, 
has made remarkable strides In the short 
time she has been connected with motion 
pictures. No star has been as much In the 
public eye, or achieved as much as has 
Miss Kenyon in the year and a half she 
has been before the camera. 



BERNHARDT IN HOSPITAL 

Mine. Sarah Bernhardt, whose tour "of 
the West and South had to be cancelled on 
account of illness was removed to the 
Mount Sinai Hospital on Monday where 
she underwent a slight operation. Her 
condition is said not to be critical despite 
her age. 



NEW "PASSING SHOW" PRODUCED 
Pn-rBBUBo. Pa., April 17. — "The Pass- 
ing Show of 1917," the new Winter Gar- 
den production, was presented at the Al- 
vin Theatre, here, to-night, and will con- 
tinue thronghout the week. It will be seen 
at the Winter Garden, New York, April 26. 



MINSTRELS PLAY RETURN DATES 

The F. C. Huntington's Mighty Min- 
strels have played return dates in nine 
different towns during its tour this sea- 
son, thereby proving that the policy of 
giving good shows, which this organisation 
has adopted, is a good one. 

CHICAGO OPERA INVADING N. Y. 

Cleofonte Campaninl, general director of 
the Chicago Opera Association, announced 
last week a four weeks' season of grand 
opera by bis organization in New York 
City, commencing some time during the 
month of January next' 



"CHEATERS" LAYS OFF 

"Cheating Cheaters," which closed 
Saturday night at the Eltinge Theatre, 
will not make a spring tour, but will rest 
until Aug. 13, when it will reopen in At- 
lantic City for a tour of several months. 

FORM MORE "KNIFE" COMPANIES 

The Sbuberts announce that, owing to 
the success of Eugene Walter's melodrama, 
"The Knife," at the Bijou Theatre, two 
additional companies will immediately be 
organized for other cities. 



CARL HAYDN LOSES SISTER 

Chicago, April 14. — Mrs. William 
White, youngest sister of Carl Haydn, 
principal tenor of the Aborn production of 
"The Princess Pat" company, died here 
last Saturday. 



DAD FRAZIER TO RETIRE 
Dad Frazier Is offering his famous Phila- 
delphia hotel for sale, and as soon as a 
purchaser is found will retire from active 
business life. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



AT B. F. KHTHS PALACT THLATO 

This Week, April 16 

LEWIS and GORDON Present 






IN 








By JOHN B. HYMER 

SCORING ONE OF THE SEASON'S BIGGEST NOVELTY SUCCESSES 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




UNIONS PLAN WIDESPREAD 

FIGHT AGAINS T B. S. MOSS 

Existing Trouble Between Manager and Stage Employees and 

Motion Picture Operators' Organization Will Come to Head 

May 1 — Unions Have Given Ultimatum 



The trouble which has existed for some 
time between the B. S. Moss Circuit of 
Theatres and The International Alliance 
of Theatrical Stage Employees and Mo- 
tion Picture Operators of the United 
States and Canada will be brought to a 
climax on May 1. At that time it has 
been learned a nation-wide movement will 
be started by the motion' picture oper- 
ators affiliated with the Alliance when, 
unless Moss agrees to the terms asked, 
they will refuse to project any of the 
feature films manufactured or distrib- 
uted by him in any theatre. 

At the convention of the Alliance in 
Cleveland on February 26 a motion was 
made that unless Moss signed a contract 
with the New York branch of the Alliance 
to employ union labor measures would 
be taken throughout the country to re- 
strain operators affiliated with the Alli- 
ance from projecting Moss pictures. Sixty 
days was the time limit set for him to 
signify his attitude in the matter. 

Harry Williams, who represented the 
Theatrical Federation of Greater New 
York has had several conferences with 
Mr. Moss in reference to this matter 
since, but the latter has refused to accede 
to his demands, it is said. Moss stated 
that he was employing union help, and 
that his employees were members of the 
Amalgamated Stage Hands Union, Local 
No. 1, affiliated with the Industrial Work- 



HUSSELY GETS 30 DAYS 

Donald Hussely, a vaudeville actor, was 
sentenced to thiry days in the workhouse 
last week for running down a man. He 
was arraigned before Judges Herbert, Gar- 
vin and Freschi in Special Sessions, 
charged with operating his automobile at 
the rate of thirty miles an hour while in- 
toxicated and refusing to stop after he ■ 
had struck an elderly man. The police- 
man who made the arrest testified that 
he had to chase the prisoner for over nine 
blocks before he was able to place him 
under arrest, and that while he was mak- 
ing out the summons the prisoner slapped 
his face. 

JOHNNY SINGER BLACKLISTED 

Johnny Singer was placed on the black 
list of the Vaudeville Managers' Protective 
association last week as a result of having 
walked out of the Joe Wood'* "Pausing 
Show of Vaudeville," an act at the Avenue 
B Theatre a week ago Monday. Singer 
is said to have told wood that he was a 
White Rat and attempted to get other 
members of the act to walk out with him. 
This they refused to do. 



era of the World. Therefore, he should 
not be bothered, he said. 

Williams stated that as they were not 
affiliated with the American Federation of 
Labor they had .no standing in labor cir- 
cles, and that the unions he represented 
were the only ones which were duly recog- 
nized by organized labor. 

The matter of Moss's reported refusal 
to sign up with the unions will be 
brought to the attention of Chaa. O. Shay, 
international president of the Interna- 
tional Alliance next week, and he, it is 
said, will issue the order forbidding mem- 
bers of his organization operating any 
Moss film in theatres of the United States 
and Canada. 

It was learned that the International 
Alliance has information that Moss is 
interested in a number of theatres outside 
of New York which employ members of 
their organization, and that, when the in- 
ternational order is issued, these men will 
be called out. 

Cards have been distributed among 
union men by the organization, informing 
them that the "B. S. Moss theatres do not 
employ union men affiliated with the 
American Federation of Labor." These 
cards bear the names of the houses which 
Moss operates. 

In all of the Moss theatres a slide is 
run during the performance which states 
that the house is operated by union men. 

CHIP'S BODY MET BY N. V. A.'S 

The body of Sam Chip, the first mem- 
ber of the National Vaudeville Artists to 
die since the formation of that organiza- 
tion, was met at the Grand Central Sta- 
tion last Friday by a delegation of mem- 
bers, including John Dunne, Val Trainor, 
Henry Chesterfield, Harry Cooper, Harry 
Weber, Roy La Pearl and Fred Wayne. 



FRANCES WHITE MARRIED 

Frances White, of' Rock and White, and 
Frankie Faye, of Dyer and Faye, were 
married in Philadelphia early Thursday 
morning by a Justice of the Peace, arriv- 
ing in New York again In time to play 
their respective matinees at the Alhambra 
and Colonial Theatres. The engagement 
of this pair was supposed to have caused 
the recent rupture between Rock and 
White, but all seems to have ended hap- 
pily, and husband and wife will continue 
to work with their respective partners. 



ROEDER HAS NEW VEHICLE 

Billy Boeder will soon appear in a, new 
vaudeville offering by Blanche Merrill en- 
titled, "The Man in the Moon." 



KEITH'S DROPS CONCERTS 

The Sunday concerts which have been 
given at the Majestic Theatre, Brooklyn, 
under the B. F. Keith management, ter- 
minated their season last week. These 
concerts have proven bo successful that it 
is probable they will be resumed next 

si'nHon. 



JOE LEVY GOING ON TOUR 

Joe Levy, of the Mark Levy vaudeville 
offices, will leave on Saturday for a West- 
ern trip, visiting all the cities in which 
.Marcus Loew houses are located. Levy 
will negotiate in Chicago for the bringing 
East of a number of new acta for the 
Loew Circuit next season. On the trip he 
will go as far West as Kansas City, and 
expects to be gone thrie weeks. During 
his absence, Sylvia Sternberg will assume 
his duties in the Levy office. 



KITTY HENRY, ILL, CANCELS 

Charles Irwin and Kitty Henry were 
forced to cancel their engagement at the 
Eighty-first Street Theatre for the last 
half of last week, owing to a sudden at- 
tack of acute indigestion from which Miss 
Henry is suffering. ' They were replaced 
by Kimberly and Arnold. 

NO SUMMER REVUE AT ROYAL 

The rumor that Howard and Clark will 
appear for an extended summer season at 
the Royal Theatre with a tabloid musical 
revue is unfounded. The team will prob- 
ably appear at the Royal for a week's 
engagement in the near future with a new 
act. 



UTICA HOUSE HAS VAUDE. AGAIN 

Utica, April 16. — After a picture policy 
of three years, the Hippodrome to-day re- 
turned to vaudeville again under the man- 
agement of P. F. Clancy, formerly man- 
ager of the Dutchess Theatre, Pongh- 
keepsie, N. Y. The house is playing three 
acts booked by the Walter Plimmer 
agency of New York and feature films. 
The bill changes Monday and Thursday 
each week. 



MISS SHERMAN OPENS NEW ACT 

Dorothy Sherman showed a new act 
called "Southern Serenade" at Proctor's 
On Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street. 



PALACE FIGHTING SPECULATORS 

No more seats can be purchased in ad- 
vance for the Sunday evening performance 
at the Palace Theatre. This ruling was 
made last week in an effort to prevent 
ticket speculators from disposing of them 
at exorbitant rates. Seats may be re- 
served in advance but cannot be obtained 
until 7:30 p. m. 



FREAK SINGER MAKES DEBUT 

MKBTAKrT, Conn., April 13.— Caroline 
Cantlon, a freak voiced singer, made her 
vaudeville debnt here yesterday at Poll's 
Theatre, and won considerable praise. 



WOOD HAS NEW ACT 

Joe Wood put in a new act called the 
"Passing Revue of Vaudeville" at the Pal- 
ace, Brooklyn, last week, but, after wit- 
nessing a few performances, decided to 
send it out of town for several weeks for 
the purpose of making changes in the cast 
before asking agents to look it over. 

LINDSAY WITH PHYSIOC 4 STORY 

Earl Lindsay, formerly connected with 
Harry Davis of Pittsburgh, and for whom 
he made many important productions dur- 
ing the past three years, is now associated 
with Physioe A Story. 

He will produce vaudeville acts, revues 
and direct motion pictures. 

PLIMMER BOOKING ILION 

Walter Plimmer is now booking the 
Opera House, Ilion, N. Y., which, in the 
past, has received its vaudeville acts from 
Jos. Eckl. Four acts are used each half 
of the week in addition to a feature pic- 
ture. Ben J. Young is manager of the 
house. 



GOLDEN AND NALDY JOIN 

Irving Golden has joined with Frank 
Xaldy, of Naldy and Naldy, and the new 
team opens on the Loew Circuit at' the 
Lyric Theatre, Hoboken. 







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SINGER'S MIDGETS FOR FAIRS 

Chicago, April 15. — Singer's Midgets 
have been signed up for a ten weeks' Fair 
season, under the direction of F. M. 
Barnes, Inc. The aggregation now con- 
sists of thirty-four people, sixteen horses, 
three elephants and forty dogs. 



SIMON IN NEW ACT AGAIN 

Louis Simon will open at Keith's, Jer- 
sey City, to-morrow in "It Can't Be 
Done," which Is a re-vamp of "The New 
Coachman." •The Bride of the Nile," 
which Simon opened in several weeks ago, 
is booked for next season on U. B. O. time. 

HARRIS HAS CHARGE OF CABARET 

Cincinnati, April 16. — Charles Harris, 
who has been in vaudeville the past sea- 
son with the team of Harris and La Vers, 
will again have charge of the cabaret at 
Chester Park, this making his sixth sea- 
son in that position. 



SHEEDY AGENCY MOVES 

The Sheedy Vaudeville Agency, which 
has been located at 1440 Broadway for the 
past seven years, has taken a suite of 
offices in the Putnam Building which they 
will begin to occupy next week 

MYERS MANAGING LYRIC 

Sam Myers, formerly manager of the 
Audubon Theatre, is now managing the 
Lyric Theatre for William Fox. Ben F. 
Jackson replaces Myers at the Audubon. 

MARINELU GIVES CITY AUTO 
Park Ridge, N. J., April 16. — H. B. 
Marlnclll has presented his Imperial tour- 
ing car to this borough where he resides, 
for the use of the local Fire Department. 

NEW ACT SHOWS THURSDAY 

"Neglect," a sketch by Ben Barnett will 
have its initial presentation at the Harlem 
Opera House, on Thursday. The east of 
four people is headed by Eva Blanchard. 

ROYAL WIRELESS SILENCED 

The wireless at the Royal Theatre be- 
longing to Ernest Richardson, chief elec- 
trician, has been dismantled in accordance 
with governmental war orders. 



PLAN CLIVE-PLOWDEN SKETCH 
Miss Dorr Plowden and Henry Olive 
will join next season In presenting a vaude- 
ville sketch which Mr. Olive offered for 
four years in England. 



WRITING FOR CANTOR 

Eddie Cantor, who will appear with the 
Follies of 1917, has engaged James Madl- 
son to write him some material especially 
fitted to hie personality. 

SULLY GETS NEW ACT 
Harry W. Solly, Russian composer and 
pianist, has a new novelty piano act which 
will be seen In vaudeville shortly. 



SHARROCKS SIGN FOR CENTURY 

Harry snd Emma Sharrock will be 
nmong the principals in the Century pro- 
duction next season. 



SANTLEY HAS NEW ACT 

Frederick Santley will shortly appear 
in a new vaudeville skit written by Clif- 
ton Crawford. 



KLINE A GREEN HAVE SKIT 
Rose Green and Barney Kline will soon 
appear in vaudeville with a skit entitled 
"No You Dont!" 



EDMUNDS & LEEDOM IN SOUTH 
Edmunds snd Leedom are playing a 
route over the Southern U. B. O. Time. 



LADY LOUISE AGNESE 
Leading Lady of the Irish Co ll— h i 



LEVY TO DIRECT TOUR 

Jack Levy is arranging an American 
tour for Arthur Singer. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 




RIVERSIDE 



An excellent all around bill provided 
for the week at this theatre was re- 
sponsible for another capacity audience 
on Monday night, which, beginning; with 
the Hearst-Path* News Pictorial with its 
timely military views, liberally applauded 
every act on the entire program. 

The Musical Johnsons, a woman and 
two men, perform well upon the xylo- 
phones and render a number of popular 
and classical selections. 

Mabel Russel and Marty Ward & Co. 
present a musical hodge-podge of singing 
and dancing in which Ward's clowning is 
the feature. He gets a number of laughs 
by bis antics, but a portion of it should 
be immediately eliminated. It is entirely 
too coarse for a big time audience. One 
bit, in particular, was introduced several 
years ago on the Polo Grounds by John 
Even, then with the Chicago ball team, 
and was responsible for his banishment 
from the grounds by the umpire. The 
old Bong and operatic medley at the fin- 
ish of the act brought it much applause. 
The Four Headings, an exceptionally 
good acrobatic act, do some thrilling 
stunts and go through their routine with 
astonishing ease. The men are all clean 
cut, well built young fellows, and, dressed 
in gymnasium suits, present an attractive 
appearance. 

Joe Cook, with his one-man vaudeville 
show, was mildly amusing and fits well 
in a bill of good acta. It would be inter- 
esting to know just what his reception 
would be if placed in a similar position 
among small time acts in some small city, 
where vaudeville audiences are not as 
sophisticated as New Yorkers. 

Eddie Leonard, closing intermission, 
carried off the lion's share of the applause 
of the evening, and is a great favorite 
with the uptown audiences. He is offer- 
ing little that is new; in fact, he is doing 
less this season than ever before. His 
singing, always the big feature of all his 
acts, has been cut down greatly and is 
confined to two numbers and an encore. 
"Ida," his big song hit of nearly a decade 
ago, still remains the biggest favorite and, 
after singing it as an encore, left the 
audience clamoring for more. He dances 
with all the ease and grace of the best 
of the younger generation of dancers, 
which is much to nia credit, for, in spite 
of his natty and youthful make-up, Eddie 
is no longer young. 

Nina Payne's character studies in dance 
are all well executed and pleasant to look 
upon, the best of which is probably "The 
Dancer's Dream," a clever number in 
which Miss Payne has been seen in all the 
local houses. The Futuristic number 
with the trombone soloist, who, by the 
way, would get far better results if he re- 
frained from continually forcing the tone 
of his instrument, is a novelty. 

John B. Hymer got many a laugh by 
his clever impersonation of the old darky, 
who, after reading the story of the life 
of Faust, determined that he, too, would 
do business with the evil one in return 
for power and riches. While perusing the 
volume he falls asleep and dreams of the 
coming of the devil, with whom he makes 
a bargain. In return for his soul he is 
to murder, steal, in fact, commit any 
crime he wishes and will never suffer 
punishment, as at the crucial moment the 
evil one will appear and save him. At a 
snap of the fingers the devil will come 
forth, but Tom, after he has committed 
murder, finds M— H in prison awaiting 
electrocution and, pacing up and down his 
narrow cell, he snaps his fingers and calls 
"Come, Red!" "Come, Bed!" all in vain. 

Hymer's impersonation of the old 
darky, who had temporarily lost faith in 
his religion, is excellent. 

May Irwin has selected a couple of new 
songs for her act as well as one or two 
new stories, which have brightened up her 
offering considerably. She had many 
friends in Monday night* s audience. 

The -Fourteenth Episode of "Patria" 
closed the ML W. V. 



SHOW REVIEWS 



COLONIAL 

Manager Darling is offering a regular 
musicale at the Colonial this week, every 
act on the bill, with the exception of the 
playlet, containing music, and a lot of it. 
Making Lucie Valmont and Jack Rey- 
nen open the show seemed to be drawing 
rather hard lines on the pair, for their 
numbers are too quiet and pretty to be 
sung to the accompaniment of the seat- 
banging of late-comers. Yet, a perusal 
of the rest of the bill shows that there 
was really no other logical place for the 
duo except that of opening. The setting 
of the act is nothing short of beautiful 
and the pair sing some half-dozen oper- 
atic and semi-classical selections in a 
most pleasing and artistic way. 

They were followed by J. Warren 
Eeane and Grace White, "the trickoIogiBt 
and the pianist." The act opened with 
a classical piano solo by MisB White, and 
the audience was preparing itself for 
classical act number two until her part- 
ner began his sleight-of-hand manouvers. 
Outside of the "handkerchief knot" trick, 
Eeane stays much along the beaten track 
of his predecessors. 

Lady Agneae and Her Irish Colleens 
made a decided hit. The turn is typically 
Irish from beginning to end, making no 
pretence of being anything other than an 
"Irish Ceilidh" (which is an Irish evening 
at home). The girls sing, dance and play 
in an entertaining way. 

Ward and Van, two street musicians, ' 
with a harp and violin, practically 
stopped the show. The violinist plays so 
very badly, purposely, at times, that it 
must have taken considerable study on 
his part to master such inaccuracy and 
discord. The nonchalance with which he 
plays his "blue" notes is ludicrously 
funny. At other times he plays really well 
to show you that he can play if he cares 
to. The harpist furnishes a happy con- 
trast with the seriousness with which he 
undertakes his work. 

Moore and Moore were next, and kept 
on doing more and more. They have Bock 
and White's habit of responding to en- 
cores moat liberally, but due credit must 
be given to Florence Moore and her 
brother Frank, for they are a clever team. 
Miss Moore's first number was probably 
her best, while her brother's cane business 
is the best thing he did. The chatter in 
the act is funny and gets the desired 
laughs. The songs are put over nicely. 
The pair have enough material in their 
turn for three or four acts. 

Following intermission, D*Avigneau's 
Chinese duo held the spot. The China- 
man who sings surprises the audience by 
displaying a singing voice which is more 
typically American than Chinese. When 
he attempts the Prologue from "Pagli- 
acci," however, he is aspiring too high, 
but the number wins applause. The man 
at the piano plays several selections well 
enough, bnt spoils it all with a noisy, 
carelessly played rag selection at the end.' 
Joseph E. Bernard and Hazel Harring- 
ton let the audience in on a family spat 
in their playlet. Both play their roles 
well, and the plot, though very light, sus- 
tains interest. The lines brought many 
laughs, and the epilogue — if such it might 
be called — made a clever anti-climax. 

The show was closed by Maud Lambert 
and Ernest R. Ball. This pair found 
going over big an easy matter. Miss 
Lambert's singing and Ball's piano play- 
ing shared equal honors. One of Miss 
Lambert's costumes received applause 
from some admiring women folk. Ball's 
patriotic numbers pleased particularly. 
The audience admired his bigness in play- 
ing some other song writer's work. Lam- 
bert and Ball scored the real hit of the 
evening, and deserved the final spot ac- 
corded them. ' H. 6. 



J 



ROYAL 

The Hughes Musical Trio started the 
Royal bill off in great shape. It will be 
reviewed under New Acts. 

Johnnie Small and the Small Sisters 
followed. Their turn is put on in a 
classy way, and has considerable to recom- 
mend it. However, the act needs speed- 
ing up. The first number is sung entirely 
too slow, and starts the act off to a 
draggy beginning. Although it livens up 
a bit as it goes along, more "pep" should 
be injected throughout, because the trio 
has plenty of talent and ability, and the 
turn would be a sure fire winner if livened 
up. The dancing is the best thing in the 
act, while the chatter is also very en- 
tertaining. The two girls make a very 
chic appearance. 

Jack Alfred and Company were next, 
and will receive a review under New Acts. 
Their turn, which is an acrobatic novelty, 
brought down the honae. 

Willie Weston was in a surprisingly 
early spot, but that did not seem to 
bother him. He held the audience with 
his songs, stories, recitations and foolish- 
ness without the least effort. 

His ragtime song of "The Shooting of 
Dan McGrew" deserved a bigger hand 
than it was accorded. Some of the lines 
in his recitation about "America," refer- 
ring to conscription, do not seem quite in 
place during the present national agita- 
tion on the point. Perhaps it would be 
better for Weston to eliminate this poem 
for the time being. 

Claude and Fanny Usher closed the first 
half of the bill with their playlet 
"Fagan's Decision." With the story of 
the ex-pugilist who adopts the daughter 
of the man whose foul blow disabled him 
from further activities in the ring, the 
pair won warm applause from the audi- 
ence. Aa Patsey, the orphan, Fannio 
Usher is excellent and to her fine acting 
much of the act's success is due. 

After intermission, Miller and Lyles, 
two black-faced comedianB "blessed with 
ignorance," presented their quaint dia- 
logue and burlesque boxing bout. The 
material that this pair use is great stuff 
and really typical of a pair of good-for- 
nothing darkies. The pair take off their 
types well. But, for some reason or 
other, Miller and Lyles found it hard- 
going. Although many of the lines 
fained laughs, they were not of the whole- 
earted order that one - becomes accus- 
tomed to hearing at the Royal. Even 
their boxing bout dance at the end of the 
turn, which is highly original and clever 
as well, registered only luke warm. 

Anna Chandler, who was featured on 
the billing, closed the show and was a 
great disappointment. The audience that 
she was singing to like any sort of a 
music act, so her ability to successfully 
put over popular songs cannot be judged 
from their applause. 

At the piano was Dave Dreyer, who has 
written her material and who has found 
an apt singing publicity agent in Miss 
Chandler. 

The first number, in which she endeav- 
ors to impersonate men of different na- 
tionalities, fell far short of the mark, the 
English impersonation being the only 
passable one. Her next number is a tune- 
ful waltz, bnt, sad to relate, Miss Chand- 
ler is a very poor waltzer, and it is better 
not to review her efforts at dancing. 
When she endeavors by several sympathy 
tricks to get the audience to whistle 
along with her in the waltz, she fails ut- 
terly. The number is dragged out un- 
pardonably. From here on tine act picks 
up, and the other three numbers passed 
muster. 

The fourteenth episode of "Patria" 
closed the show. H. G. 



PALACE 



Gertrude Hoffman and her company of 
singers and dancers are held over as the 
headliners and closed the show. White and 
Cavanagh were also held over and scored 
one of the big hits of the show. 

The Five Nelsons, offering a colorful 
hoop-spinning and juggling act, opened the 
performance in a flashy and speedy man- 
ner. The boys looked good and won all 
the way with their routine of feature 
tricks. 

Henry Regal and David Bender have an 
act that is different from the usual two 
men acts, inasmuch as they have nearly 
all the old gags that could be thought of 
and some of the best gymnastic tricks im- 
aginable. The talk introduces the fast 
work of the gymnasts and takes a little 
edge off the fast work of the two athletes. 
An investment of some money with a good 
vaudeville author for a few snappy gags 
to fit the situations would greatly help. 
Their two finishing tricks on a sort of 
trapeze-rigging brought them a good sized 
hit. 

Jean Adair and a company of four cap- 
able artists held down the third spot with 
much credit. The act is crowded with 
bright dialogue and comedy situations and 
the emotional period is worked up in 
splendid style. Miss Adair gives an excel- 
lent interpretation of her part and easily 

had things her own way. The curtain calls 
were well deserved. 

Dyer and Fay, assisted by an unnamed 
young woman, won laughs in a decisive 
manner. Dyer is a good looking straight 
man and Frank Fay Is a comic who relies 
more on expression than on material. The 
girl in the act reads. her lines badly and 
has many entrances and exits, which de- 
tract at times. 

Daisy Jean proved conclusively that she 
can play several musical Instruments and 
play them well. She sings excellently and 
performs splendidly with a cello, harp, vio- 
lin and piano. 

After intermission Bert Clark, assisted 
by Miss Hamilton, offered their specialty 
entitled "A Wayward Conceit," which 
brought laughs and scored a big bit with 
Its finishing dance. The act is a trifle 
faster now and an arm band worn by 
Clark informed the audience that it had a 
military bearing. This small detail fol- 
lowed immediately the showing of several 
slides ordered by the government which Is 
to stimulate recruiting. 

George White and Lucille Cavanagh are 
really playing their last week in vaudeville 
as partners and, therefore, rearranged their 
routine of dances, featuring a new number 
called "The Palace Special" The innova- 
tion of an "impersonator number" by White 
proved a novelty. He asked the audience 
to ask for an imitation of their favorite 
male dancer and then did the dances. 

"Patria" showing the 14th installment 
opened. S. L. H. 



WOMAN MADE TREASURER 

Henrietta Barge has been appointed 
treasurer of the Orpheum Theatre, Brook- 
lyn, and enjoys the distinction of being the 
first woman to hold that position in the 
Keith theatres. Miss Barge entered the 
Keith employ four years ago as stenog- 
rapher and telephone operator at the 
Greenpoint Theatre. From there she was 
transferred to the Bnshwick in the same 
capacity, and later made an assistant 
treasurer there. 



BUYS BRONX THEATRE SITE 

A portion of the John B. Haskfns es- 
tate, at Fordham Road and Third Avenne, 
Bronx, has been sold. The buyer will 
erect a theatre on the property or sell it 
for a theatre site. 



CUPID AT CENTURY SHOW 

Billie Fisher of the "Century Girl" com- 
pany and Peter Brissett, of the Century 
Theatre orchestra, were married last week. 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




AESTHETIC DANCERS 

Theatre— Mighty-first Street. 
Style — Greek and Oriental dances. 
Time— Seventeen minuter. 
Setting— Full stage. 

Paul Dnrand presents the eight mem- 
bers of this company in a series of 
interpretive Greek and Oriental dances, 
arranged and staged by Albertine 
Rasch. This offering seems to be a 
bit too late to receive the recognition 
that a torn of its kind might, on ac- 
count of being practically a duplicate ' 
of the work executed by the ballet in 
the -Adelaide & Hngbes act, as well as 
other offerings. 

Their routine consists of six dances, 
three being ballet numbers and the 
others specialties, one a solo number 
by Anna l<a Troy and the other two 
.with Dorothy Scott assisting Miss La 
Troy. 

"Aesthetic," according to the stand- 
ard dictionary, means beautiful, which 
is very true in the case of these num- 
bers. However, they show no indi- 
viduality or originality in arrangement, 
having been executed quite frequently 
in the past by several other acts. 

Aa a rule, in a turn of this kind, it 
is expected that the material used 
should be original and unique, as these 
elements are generally constituted the 
principal causes for an act going over. 
.The fact that this offering was not 
new or original was plainly evinced by 
the applause accorded by the audience 
at the end of the numbers. Credit, 
however, must be given Miss La Troy 
for her "Hindoo Prayer," number, as 
well as the "Egyptian Pittoresque," 
which she does with Miss Scott. Both 
numbers are novel and well executed 
but, still, of not sufficient strength to 
make up for the general defidences of 
the balance of the dances in the turn. 

The two-a-day time will be an im- 
possibility for tbe turn and as it is 
at present constituted it will bardly be 
acceptable to the neighborhood houses. 

A. C. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued oa page 23) 



LEW COOPER & CO. 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 
Style— Comedy $kit. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting— One and full stage. 

Lew Cooper, assisted by Luring 
Smith and Dorothy Clark, presents a 
comedy skit entitled, "Seventy Cents." 
Cooper doing blackface as a taxi-driver, 
persues a man and woman, performers, 
into a theatre in his effort to collect 
"seventy cents" due him as fare. 

Much humorous dialogue ensues 
while they are working in one. The 
curtain then goes up and the couple 
appear to do their turn. Tbe taxi- 
driver tries to break into the per- 
formance, and Cooper does some busi- 
ness in chasing the man about the 
stage until an usher is called that 
greatly resembles business used by sev- 
eral other acts which claim it as 
original material. It is rather crude 
stuff to be done in two-a-day houses 
anyway even though it is sure fire 
comedy. , 

Cooper then returns to the stage and 
again tries to get the money. He car- 
ries placards across the stage bearing 
the amount of money due him and also 
gets stage hands to do the same. 

Smith sings several songs and the 
girl accompanies him at the piano. 
She also plays .a solo. Cooper sings 
two songs and a parody, verse for verse, 
against the original sung by Smith. 

The act is made up of a lot of 
"hodge-podge" and, in its present shape,' 
is barely up to. the standard of neigh- 
borhood theatres. Cooper could as- 
semble a wholesome offering as he has 
two very competent people working 
with him. A. TJ. 



EDDIE AND EDITH ADAIR 

Theatre— Proctor's Fifty-eighth St. 

Style^SWt. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

The scene represents the interior of a 
shoe store. An attractive young girl en- 
ters and asks the clerk to fit her for a 
pair of shoes. This he does, carrying on 
a cross fire conversation with her at the 
same time. When he finally fits her, 
she informs him that she doesn't want to 
buy the shoes but merely came in to pass 
away the time. 

The man aings a short number about 
life being a see-saw. 

Tbe conversation then turns back to 
shoes, and the man has a clever speech 
in which he brings in the brand name of 
mostly every known make of shoe. He 
finally sells the girl a pair of sample 
shoes and pockets the money, confiding 
to her that he can make money aa long 
as the firm does not install a cash reg- 
ister. At that moment, a delivery boy 
appears with a cash register, and the 
man is crestfallen until the girl offers 
to become his cashier for life, keeping the 
business in the family. 

The idea of the skit is original, and 
the pair give a pleasing performance. 
Some of the lines are a trifle weak and 
the skit could be improved by eliminat- 
ing a line here and there and giving the 
man more of a chance to display his 
singing ability, for be has a clear and 
pleasing voice. The skit will have no 
trouble in succeeding. H. O. 



"FLIRTATION" 

Theatre— lioyal. 

Style — College musical farce. 

Time — Twenty-one minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

In an attractive futuristic set, the 
audience makes the acquaintance of six 
collegians — three boys and three co-eds. 
The piece has no definitely connected 
action, merely serving as a vehicle for 
several musical and dancing numbers 
separated from each other by love-mak- 
ing scenes. 

George Goodridge, in the role of Terry 
Blee Snow, is supposed to be the co- 
median, and occupies the center 1 of the 
stage for the greater part of the act. 
Goodridge delivers his lines and business 
as a "straight" when the lines were 
obviously written for an eccentric. 
Consequently, the stuff does not get 
the laughs that were intended. 

The offering la very mediocre. The 
lesson that Terry is given in love-mak- 
ing scents of the burlesque stage, and 
is long drawn out. 

The lesson in dancing reminds one too 
much of a similar bit of business done 
by the Three Sullys. 

Such gags as (She) "You tickle me." 
(He) "You tickle me' first" were greeted 
by the audience as old friends. 

H. G. 



JOHNNIE FORD AND CO. 

Theatre— Palace, State* Island. 
Style — Novel comedy playlet. 
Time— Twenty-six minutes. 
Setting— Ttco special sets, novelties. 

Johnnie Ford, late of the team of 
Ford and Gerue, and his company, 
Roy Barton and Jessie Ray, offer a very 
novel act entitled, "At O'Ell Junc- 
tion." 

Tbe act is billed as something new 
and novel and is in three scenes, with 
a number of novelties introduced during 
the action. 

The curtain rises on a street scene 
with a window in the center of the drop 
where a stenographer is writing. Ford 
and Barton come on and Ford explains 
that he is commissioned to write a skit 
for a well known "vode" team. They 
get their wits together, get an idea and 
then spy the stenographer. 

Having no money save the stage kind, 
they determine to get tbe girl to type the 
sketch and pass the phoney money on 
her. It seems that the stenographer 
happens to be Barton's wife but they 
are not living together. 

Ford starts to dictate the story to the 
girl and as she starts writing the lights 
go out and, when they flash on again, 
the scene Is that of 0*1111 Junction, a 
country station in California. Ford 
comes on as a dnde missing the depart- 
ing train and Just then a "chick" comes 
on and Ford gets acquainted. He asks 
her name and she replies, "Kitty CJotit," 
and deftly removes hia watch. He 
makes a date for her for the evening 
and she exits. 

Next, Barton, aa the station agent, 
appears, and for the next ten minutes 
the dialogue between the two furnishes 
a great deal of comedy. Ford sits down 
to write a letter home, the stage darkens 
and aa he signs the letter, the pad he is 
writing on flashes on tbe back drop and 
we see the letter in movies. After this 
Ford gives a recital of "The Movie 
Fiend's Dream," which la the only old 
material in the akit 

The different stunts and bits in the 
act are all snre fire and are delivered 
very effectively. 

The sketch went over well and Bar- 
ton and Ford responded to repeated ap- 
plause with a clever little ditty. The 
act would be better without this. As a 
wbole the sketch is new and novel, the 
lines clever and the action fine. Ford 
should certainly make a hit with-it be- 
cause, although it is a trifle long, one 
never tired an instant during its run. 

H. S. P. 



RAY ROTTACK 



Theatre — National. 
Style— Singing. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Ray Rottack possesses a pleasing 
tenor voice for solo numbers and yodel- 
ing. 

His first selection is patriotic in theme 
and possesses considerable dash. For his 
second number, be rings "Carisaima." 
His third number is an Irish selection, 
and hia final one is a yodeling Irish lul- 
laby. 

A glance at this resume is enough to 
. show that Rottack has considerable -ver> 
eatility. H. G. 



PEGGY BREMEN A. BRO. 

Theatre — Eighty-first St. 
Style — Balancing on ladders. 
Time — Eight minutes. 
Setting -Special. 

The setting is supposed to represent 
the Imp's Playground. 

The devil appears and courts his lady 
love, an imp. The two mount unsup- 
ported ladders and start to perform some 
remarkable balancing. They do so and 
perform upon them with as much assur- 
ance and skill as if the ladders were se- 
curely fastened to tbe floor. The man 
juggles* and performs some acrobatic 
feats while on tbe ladder. The woman 
makes her ladder "jump rope." 

As a final stunt, the woman's ladder 
falls apart and ahe is left with only a 
portion of it upon which she balances 
herself in first rate fashion. 

The act is a winner. The pair have 
found something different in the line of 
dumb acts. H. G. 



GEHAN & SPENCER 

Theatre— Audubon. 
Style— Song and dance. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

These performers do some very clever 
stepping. Their songs and chatter are 
weak, but. as their stepping consumes 
most of the time, this fault la minor. 
However, the gag about Mary Rose 
should be eliminated. The foundation 
of the joke is as old as Methusalem, and 
it is gotten off with the identical 
language used by Moran and Wheeler. 

Tbe dances consist of an opening num- 
ber, an eccentric rube style step, a 
snappy stepping number and a closer. 
All are well done, and tbe stepping of 
the team is bound to please. 

During their dancing, the team keeps 
up a more or less insistent chatter. If 
some of tbe chatter could be changed, 
tbe act would be improved. 

The pair are quite above an average 
of steppers. H. G. 



DON BARCLAY & CO. 

Thea t re — A u dubon. 

Style — Burlesque comedian. 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

Don Barclay is an entertaining 
burlesque comedian, with an act that 
should go over big when pruned down 
here and there. He ia assisted by n 
straight who acquits himself satisfac- 
torily and by a pugilist who figures in 
the latter part of the act. 

The first part of the tarn baa to do 
with a glass of beer which belongs to 
Don, but which the straight insists upon 
holding while be tells Don a story. Don 
is not a good listener, interrupting time 
and again In an effort to get the beer, 
and each time the straight begins bis 
story all over again. 

Finally, Don, unbeknown to tbe 
straight, sucks op the beer through a 
rubber tube while tbe story is being 
told. While the business is funny, there 
are entirely too many interruptions by 
Don, and by eliminating several of these, 
tbe result would be found to be more sat- 
isfactory. 

There is then some rather clever cross 
fire chatter, followed by a burlesque box- 
ing match between Don and tbe pugiliit 
which makes a good close to the act. 
Probably, if the pugilist knocked out 
Don so that the bitter would have to be 
carried off the stage, the end of the act 
might thus be made even funnier. 

H. G. 



"JUST FOR INSTANCE" 

Theatre— City. > 

Style— Dramatic sketch. ' ' 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

"Just for Instance" ia a play within 
a play. It opena with two girls dis- 
cussing a story tbey have been reading 
in the newspaper concerning a girl friend 
whose husband has turned out to be I 
thief and scoundrel. One of the girls 
asks the other, who ia married, what she 
would do in a similar instance, and the 
stage darkens and they pretend a story. 

What follows is melodramatic and 
badly acted. The married woman ore- 
tends that the girl with whom sht has 
been conversing has been too friendly 
with her husband and that he bis stolen 
some money from the factory in which 
they are employed. The wife gives tbe 
girl money to return to her home and 
then the scene reverts to the beginning 
with the married woman telling the 
story. Her husband enters and tbey pro- 
ceed to tell him the story as the curtain 
slowly descends. 8. W. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



WE HAVE PURCHASED 

FROM 

THE GUS EDWARDS PUBLISHING COMPANY 



THAT WONDERFUL 






By WILL D. COBB and GUS EDWARDS 

PROFESSIONAL COPIES, ORCHESTRATIONS, Etc, NOW READY 
14 GREAT SONGS 14 

IT'S TIME FOR EVERY BOY TO BE A SOLDIER , .By BRYAN and TIERNEY 

SINBAD WAS IN BAD By murphy and carroll 

SOMEWHERE ON BROADWAY By murphy and carroll 

IF YOU EVER GET LONELY By kahn and Marshall 

SHE'S DIXIE ALL THE TIME By bryan and tierney 

WHERE THE BLACK EYED SUSANS GROW B y radford and whiting 

DOWNHONOLULU WAY By DEMPSEY, BARTNETTE and BURKE 

HOW'S EVERY LITTLE THING IN DIXIE . . By yellen and gumble 

THERE'S'EGYPT IN YOUR DREAMY EYES By brown and spencer 

BECAUSE YOU'RE IRISH By KAHN and VAN alstyne 

THE WORLD BEGAN WHEN I MET YOU By murphy and gumble 

THE BLUE BIRD. By clare kummer 

I CAN HEAR THE UKALELES CALLING ME. . ..By VINCENT and paley 
THE BOMBA SHAY By henry lewis, creamer and yayton 

JEROME H. REMICK & CO. 

137 Fort Street, West 228 Tremont Street 219 West 46th Street Majestic Theatre Bid*, 608 Market Street 
DETROIT BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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O RLAND W. VAUCHAN, EDITOR 

Paul C Sweinhart, Managing; Editor 

NEW YORK, APRIL 18, 1917 

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War Won't Hurt Theatre* 

To the question as to whether 'or not 
the theatrical business in the United 
States will be affected by our becoming 
one of the belligerents in the great war, 
the answer is, "It will not." 

This answer is the only logical one. It 
is the natural deduction arrived at by 
comparison with conditions in England 
and the effect those conditions have had 
noon theatricals there. England forma 
the best example for as to go by, because 
its language and customs are oars. The 
habits and desires of Anglo-Saxons are 
the same wherever they may be. To 
them recreation is necessary to existence 
and no recreation mass such a general 
appeal aa the theatre; 

In London, with the war at its very 
doors, with the Zepplins throwing bombs 
in the very heart of the theatre district, 
the theatres have never done better busi- 
ness than has been theirs since the war 
began. Several plays have been running 
for. nearly a year and one has reached 
nearly two years and, at present, they 
give no indication of early closing. 

Taking this as onr criterion, we have 
little to fear that a state of war. is in 
any way going to put a damper on thea- 
trical attendance here. It is possible 
that a change may come in the style of 
entertainment required to suit our change 
of taste. It came in England and Aus- 
tralia and it is reasonable to suppose it 
win come here, but as this is a change to 
which we are accustomed, we will, not 
even realize it when it comes. 

We will never take notice of the fact 
that we derive more amusement and en- 
tertainment from farces, musical comedies 
and heart plays than we do from the 
heavier dramatic works; we will only 
know that _ we do enjoy, .them. 

The presence ■ of war in our midst has 
not produced a calamity-howler in the 
amusement field. He is present in other 
fields but in theatricals and kindred 
amusements he is particularly noticeable 
for his absence. 

Aa to the managers themselves, those to 
whom we look for our entertainment, they 
never, with the exception of a few, were 
more optimistic than now, in proof of 
which they are preparing to build more 
theatres and have began work on their 
plans for next season earlier than usual, 
and, in many cases intend giving more 
productions than ever before. 



Answers to Queries 

M. B, New York.— "The Climax" was 
originally produced at Weber's Theatre 
Monday afternoon, April 12, 1909. It was 
intended as a matinee attraction, but it 
made such a success that two weeks later 
it became the regular attraction at Daly's. 
'•The Girl Prom Rector's" was the regular 
bill at Weber's. 

• • m 

B. A. W., Schenectady.— 1, "The Geisha" 
and "The Duchess of Daatzic" were pre- 
sented at Daly's; 2, "The Geezer," a bur- 
lesque on "The Geisha," was presented at 
Weber & Fields' Music Hall. 

• • • 

G. G. — Forbes Robertson made his first 
American appearance when a young man 
as a member of the first company which 
the late Henry Irving brought to the 
United States. 

• • • 

E. R., Reading. — Wallack'a Theatre was 

dosed the night of President McKinley's 

death until after the funeral. James K. 

Hackett was playing an engagement there. 

•> • • 

W. E., Newark. — The first motion pic- 
tures seen in this country were shown at 
Koster & Rial's by the Vitascope, a 
Thomas Edison machine. 

• • • 

L. EL W. — Maude Adams appeared in 
"L'Alglon" and "Chantecler" at the Knick- 
erbocker Theatre, but the productions were 

about ten years apart. 

• a • 

L. I. G— The father of Selma Braatz 
was one of the Braatz Brothers, popular 
head and hand-balancers about twenty 
years ago. , 

E. K, Brooklyn. — "Alma, Where Do You 
Live!" had a long run in . German at 
Adolph Phillips'- Theatre before it was 
done in English at Weber's Theatre. 



Dislikes Split-Up Bills 

Editor, New York Cuppeb : 

Dear Sir. — I am a chronic theatre 
goer, my taste leaning most to vaudeville 
and moving pictures and many weeks I 
go to some theatre every night while the 
average is about five nights a week. I 
go to the small time as well as the big 
time houses and I consider it surprising 
how managers can keep up the standard 
of entertainment they give. 

There is one thing, however, I do find 
fault with, and that is the sandwiching 
between vaudeville acts of moving pic- 
tores, which only has a tendency to 
stretch out the length of a. bill. Of 
course, I do not want you to think I 
would attempt to tell a manager how to 
conduct his theatre, but I believe there 
are many who agree with me. 

I do not mean to do away with mov- 
ing pictures in a vaudeville theatre. 
What I mean is to have every house run 
pictures as many of them now do, either 
before or after the vaudeville. Then, a 
person who only wants to see vaudeville 
in a vaudeville house gets what he wants. 

For myself, when I want to see pic- 
tures I go to a theatre devoted exclusively 
to pictures and believe me there are many 
just like me. Respectfully yours, 

Mabtts Joyce. 

916 E. 181st Street, New York. 



Not Sued Say* Lubowska 

Editor, New York Cwpfxb: 

Dear Sir. — I find in your paper a no- 
tice to the effect that I am being sued 
by Edward D. Kurylo for breach of con- 
tract. The statement is incorrect. He 
is not suing me but the manager and 
producer of my acts or concert numbers. 
He was engaged by Carl E. Carlton to 
produce some ballet numbers in my show 
and a contract given him by the same 



|H ij fllll |iiiiiiiis i miiiiimiiim iaBuiiui]milii Hi niH Bmm 



Correspondents Wanted 

THE CLIPPER 
Wishes Live, Wide-Awake Representatives 

EVERYWHERE 

NEWSPAPER MEN PREFERRED 



BEE 



X. Y. Z.— "A Thousand Years Ago" was 
produced January 6, 1914, at the Shubert 
Theatre. Henry E. Dixey played the lead- 
ing male role. 

• • • 

A. R. F. — The imp ire Theatre was dedi- 
cated early in 1893 with "The Girl I Left 
Behind Me" aa the attraction. 

s> • • 

B. A. L, Utica.— Camilla D* Arville was 
for years one of our most popular light 
opera prima, donnas. 

• • • 

F. E. R. — Niblo's Garden waa many 
years older than the present Academy of 
Music. 

• • • 

■ ■ . i 

la, O., Brooklyn. — Ton are right. Silver. , 

and Marceline were at the Hippodrome- -■ - 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Isabelle Coe played the title role in 
"Niobe." 

Edward Shipp and Julia Lowande were 
with the Orrin Show in Mexico. 

T. E. Miaco and Barry Morris dissolved 
-partnership. 

Frank Loses was with Jacob Litt's 
Stock Company. 

The bill introduced at Albany, N. Y., to 
allow children under sixteen years of age 
to take parts in theatrical exhibition, be- 
came a law. It provided for the written 
consent of the mayor or President of 
Board of Trustees. 

A copyright treaty between Germany 
and the United States was ratified. 



party. Mr. Kurylo and I are friends. 
Mr. Carlton gave him a check for his 
services and I know only the check is still 
unpaid. I have never refused payment of 
any of my bills at any time and wish you 
to correct that article. 

The production was entirely In the 
hands of Carl E. Carlton, Times Build- 
ing, sole manager and director, and all 
contracts were made by him for every- 
thing connected with the S. A. Tour, 

Please correct this statement" and 
oblige. Lubowska. 



RIALTO RATTLES 



TALL. AND STEEP - 

They are telling this one on Joe Hart: 
Hart was looking for a man about six- 
foot-one to play a lead in a vaudeville 
playlet. An applicant appeared who 
seemed to possess all the qualifications. 

"How tali are you!" asked Hart. 

"Six-foot-one." 

"Ever played in vaudeville I" 

"Yes, sir.* 1 

"Willing to play a lead in a vaudeville 
playlet!" 

"Yes, sir I" 

"What salary have you been getting r" 

"One hundred a week." 

"I think you're much too tall," con- 
cluded Hart. 



RHYMED INTERVIEW NO. 4 

Over at the N. V. A., at any time of 
night or day, just stick around there for 
a while, and you're sure to see that Ches- 
terfield smile. As regular as the morn- 
ing sun, his smile shines down on every- 
one. Be they lowly hams or actors grand, 
for each and all there's his glad hand. 
Not everyone can smile all day, like Ches- 
terfield does at the N. V. A. A charming 
boBt of hosts is he, with studied hos- 
pitality, so whenever you're troubled with 
care and guile, you know one place where 
there's a smile. 



A ROCK IN THE PATH 

Manager Chris Egan, up at the Royal, 
is planning, a honeymoon party. When 
Frances White plays there in May, Egan 
is going to try to book Frankie Faye on 
the same bill, so that the pair can have 
a belated honeymoon. It will be the first 
bill that the newlyweds have played to- 
gether. Whereupon everybody will be 
happy. But, wait a minute 1 What will 
"Billy" Rock have to say T 

DEFINITIONS 

. First Night: A night when every eats 
who goes to the show proclaims it won- 
derful. 

Ham: An actor who hasn't landerL 

Actor: A ham who has landed. 

Stopping a Show: The thing that every 
actor would make you believe he has 
achieved. 

Applause: The sweetest melody of all. 

BET ON DAVENPORT 

"Difference in Gods" has opened at But- 
ler Davenport's Bramhall Theatre. There 
may be a difference in gods there, but you 

can bank on it that there's not a differ- 
ence in authors. 



SYBIL CARMEN FILLS IN 
Sybil Carmen filled in the breach at 
"The Midnight Frolic" Thursday night, 
lowing to the absence of Frances White, 
who waa married in the morning to Frank 
Faye, and William Rock, her partner. 
Usually, when Miss White did not appear, 
Rock has gone on alone, but Thursday 
night he would not appear. 

THEATRES CHANGE MANAGERS 

Bar Fhahcisco, April 9. — Alex. Kaiser, 
manager of the Empress Theatre, here, 
has resigned to embark in mercantile busi- 
ness. Thomas Condon, manager of the 
Portland, Ore., Hippodrome, succeeds 
him. Billy Ely, formerly manager of the 
Hippodrome, this city, succeeds Condon. 



WHAT'S NEXT? Q& 

Evelyn Nesbit is get '^ back into vaude- 
ville, so watch the newspaper*. Thaw 
must be planning to do something sensa- 
tional again. . 

*A TIMELY ONE 

Jimmy Hussey tells this one. Actors 
and convicts will be the first to "be called 
to war, so as to keep the stars and stripes 
together. 



SOUND TEE FOG HORN 

We hope that "Out of the Fog," which 
is soon to be seen in vaudeville, will not 
prove too hazy. 

SCANDAL 

Headline says "Hoffman Buys Sia 
Woman." What's he going to do with her 
now that she is hist 



TAKES AFTER FATHER 

Robert Dora's baby probably hits higher 
notes during the night than his father 
ever dreamed of. 



WILLIS SUCCEEDS CORNELL 

Minneapolis, Minn., April 8. — Al. G. 
Willis has become resident manager of 
the Pantages Theatre here, succeeding 
Harry Cornell. 



WHATTL YOU HAVE? 

A new Broadhurst play is to be called 
"Coffee for Two." "Beer for Two" would 
be a much more stimulating title. _ ■ 



TIN TIN, COME IN! 

Paul Dnrant has a new safe. 
bination is one can-opener. 



The 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 




COL. HORNE CO. 

TO PRODUCE 

NEW_PLAY 

LEADING LADY IS AUTHORESS 



Akron, 0.. April 14. — Col. Home, 
manager of the Borne Stock Co. at the 
Music Hall, will produce, next week, for 
the first time on any stage, a new play by 
Beulah Poynter, the leading lady of the 
company. 

The play is entitled "It Happened at Mid- 
night," and is characterized as a mystery 
play of startling climaxes and dual char- 
acters. 

It is expected that the piece will oc- 
cupy a New York theatre later, bnt Col. 
Home has gained the consent of Miss 
Poynter to give it a try-out here, in the 
meantime. The regular Home Co. will ap- 
pear in the play, beaded by Miss Poyn- 
ter and 6. Swayne Gordon. 

Geo. B. DePettit, business manager of 
the company, was forced to retire on ac- 
count of illness last week and has gone to 
his home in Michigan for a rest. He has 
been succeeded by Fred T<anham. 

Harry Fisher is the new assistant 
treasurer with the company, having re- 
cently closed with March's Musical Merry 
Makers. 



NEWARK CO. OPENING DELAYED 

Newark, N. J., April 14. — As the re- 
pairs being made on the Orpheum Theatre 
were not completed in time for the opening 
of the Jay Packard Stock Co., Monday, 
Mr. Packard has postponed the opening 
until to-night. Dudley Ayres and Alice 
Fleming have the leading roles and in their 
support are Franklin Munnell, Eugene 
Desmond, Claude Miller, Minnie Stanley, 
and G. B. Loftus. "Common Clay" is the 
initial attraction. 



MUSICAL CO. FOR INDIANAPOLIS 

Indianapolis, April 16. — The Park 
Theatre, which closes this week on the 
International circuit, will offer a change 
of policy next Monday when it will enter 
into a post season of summer musical 
stock. Shafer Ziegler has arranged with 
Halton Powell to send in a company of 
musical comedy players for a summer en- 
gagement. The company will include Rita 
Lawrence, ingenue; Billy Wyse, blackface 
comedian ; Gates Austin, singing and danc- 
ing comedian; Hal Johnstone, female im- 
personator: lone, the girl violinist: Lew 
Leonard, eccentric comedian ; Stella Dona- 
hue, comedian, and the Acme quartet, and 
a beauty chorus. "Step Lively" will be 
the opening bill. 

PROVIDENCE CO. OPENS 

Providence, Bi X, April 16. — The sev- 
enteenth season of. the Albee stock opens 
today under the \ianasement of Charles 
Lovenberg and "Common Clay" has been 
selected as the opening bill. Regine Wal- 
lace and Byron Reasley wjll be seen in the 
two leading roles and the roster includes 
Lynn Overman, Ann Hamilton, Helen 
Reimer, Margaret Armstrong, James H. 
Doyle, Charles Scofield, Edward Longman 
and George Wet herald. 

THOMPSON RETURNS TO POLI 

Washington, April 14. — Sam Iden 
Thompson returns next week to the cast of 
the Poll Players in "Mrs. Wiggs of the 
Cabbage Patch." having been absent since 
last Spring. He had undergone an opera- 
tion on his throat which kept him in a hos- 
pital most of the time. 



NOYES LEAVES SALEM CO. 

Salem. Mass., April 16. — Aubrey 
Noyes, director of the Empire Players at 
the Empire Theatre, has left and has been 
succeeded by Raymond Capp, director of 
the Players, in Lynn. 

MARTINS WITH CHAMPLIN CO. 

Frank Martins has joined the Charles 
Champlin Sscock Co. He was until recently 
a member of Cohan & Harris' "It Pays to 
Advertise** company. 



DOTY JOINS HARDER CO. 

Jack Doty, who recently closed with the 
Bray Co. in Columbus, O., has joined the 

Wm. Harder Co. 



COMPANY OPENING IN ALBANY 

Albany, N. Y., April 14. — William J. 
Carey's Stock Co. win open Monday at 
Harmanus Bleecker Hall, presenting 
"Jerry." Isabelle Lowe and John War- 
ner will play the leading roles and their 
support includes Helen Joy. Helen Ful- 
ton, Helen Bereaford, Allan Robinson. . 
V. Preston. Grant Ervin, George J. 
Boesel, Jack Matthews, stage manager ; 
and Earl D. Dwire, stage director. 



ST. LOUIS PLAYERS CLOSING 

St. Louis. April 14.— The Players Co. 
at the Players Theatre close their engage- 
ment to-night, presenting "Seven Keys to 
Baldpate." The sale of the theatre has 
been officially announced and the company 
must vacate. Mitchell Harris and Olive 
Templeton have been playing leads, sup- 
ported by Esther Howard, Arthur Holman, 
Dan Hanlon, director, and Dick Thompson. 

EDWARDS WANTS 3 COMPANIES 

Bbidgepokt, Conn., April 16. — Roland 
G. Edwards, stage director of the Lyric 
Players, is negotiating for three stock 
companies to play Canada the coming 
season. A company at the Grand, Ham- 
ilton, and one at the Grand, Toronto, will 
open April 30, if all goes well, and a third 
company at the' Dominion, Ottawa, will 
open May 7. 



PEARSON OPENING TENT SEASON 
GbEENVUXe. S. C, April 14.— Bert 
Pearson, and wife, Billie A. Chester, will 
open their summer season here this year 
under canvas. They carry fourteen people, 
including band and orchestra. Many of 
the former members of the company will 
ha re-engaged. Miss Chester will handle 
the leads. 



CHANGES IN FLOATING THEATRE 

Billie F. Stohlmann has joined the Jas. 
Adams Floating Theatre playing principal 
comedy parts. There have been a few 
other changes, Lester Waldorf replacing 
Mrs. Metz for piano and trombone and 
Musical Webster joining for violin and 
tuba, replacing Mr. Metz. 

ROCHESTER CO. ENGAGED 

Rochester, N. Y., April 15. — The Man- 
hattan Players, opening here April 23, 
will include Charles Halton, William 
Macauley, Edna Leslie. Vida Croly Sidney 
and Clara Mactrin. George Henry Trader 
has been engaged to direct the company. 



PHOEBE HUNT BACK IN SEATTLE 

Seattle, Wash., April 13. — Phoehj^ 
Hunt, after a short vacation, is returning 
as leading lady to the cast of the Wilkes 
Players at the Orpheum Theatre. 



EUGENIE BLAIR 

OPENS STOCK 

IN BRONX 



APPEARING IN "SAPHO" THIS WEEK 



Monday night marked the return of the 
Bronx Theatre to its former policy of stock, 
when Eugenie Blair opened a special 
limited engagement there. 

Miss Blair is a well known stock actress. 
She played all last season as a star over 
the International Circuit In "The Eternal 
Magdalene" and recently joined the Knick- 
erbocker Players, appearing with them for 
several weeks previous to their closing in 
Philadelphia. 

"Sapho" was chosen for her initial offer- 
ing and matinees will be given Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. 

The Bronx Theatre has been playing In- 
ternational attractions all season and the 
return to stock is expected to be only tem- 
porary, as- it is included in the chain of 
International houses for next Fall. 

Miss Blair appeared in the role of Fanny 
Le Grand, and in her support were Will- 
iam Bonelli as Jean Gaussin, Joseph Gil- 
low as Eugene Decbelette, Frank DeCamp 
as Uncle Cesaire, William Gross, jr., as 
Flamant, Henry Travers as Mon. Hettema, 
Doan Borup as Laondal, Albert Fleming as 
the Sergeant of Police, Henri Do Boise as 
De Potter, Margaret Lee as Madam Het- 
tema. Donah Benrimo as Aunt Divonne, 
I.ola Moynelo as Alice Don. Edith Butter- 
field as Francine. Ann Nevens as Fifi, 
Lnura Stafford as Julie and May Wilmer 
as Cleo. 



ACTRESS WEDS WEALTHY MAN 

Laweence, Mass., April 14.— Marie 
Warren, member of the Cecfl Spoon er 
Stock Co., which recently closed an engage- 
ment here, was married to Carle ton P. 
Foss, son of Granville E. Foss, owner of 
the Brightwood Mills at North Andover, 
following: the Inst matinee of the company 
here. They were married at the home of 
the bridegroom's parents at Methuen. 
Mr. Foss is a member of the Brightwood 
mill firm, but gave his occupation as that 
of a salesman. His family is one of the 
most wealthy and socially prominent in 

Essex county. The bride is now playing 
with the Spooner Co.. which has moved to 
the Castle Square Theatre. Boston. 



SEEK STOCK THEATRE 

Winch ell Smith and John Golden are 
desirous of establishing a stock company 
in Atlantic City late this spring. They 
have a number of manuscripts of plays 
that they would like to give a stock "try- 
out" to ascertain their production value. 
Robert Milton, the stage director is in- 
terested with them in this project. They 
are trying to obtain an available theatre 
at the seashore resort. 



LAWRENCE RETURNS TO FRISCO 

Saw Francisco, April 13. — Del S. Law- 
rence has returned with his stock com- 
pany to the Wigwam Theatre, after a sea- 
son in Vancouver, B. C. He follows the 
I.nnder Stevens Co. 



NUTT PLAYERS CLOSE SEASON 

■ TtrsctTMBtA, Ala., April 14. — Ed. C. 
■Nntt's Comedy Players have closed their 
season and several of its members are 
joining Angell's Comedians. Frank Del- 
maine. who has been managing the show, 
will manage the Angel) show. Other 
members joining the Angell show are 
Ruth Hamilton, Lodenia Corey, Grace 
Milbourne, Ralph Clem, Leon Phillips, E. 
Markham and Mr. and Mrs. Schaub. 



PAYTON OPENING AT LEXINGTON 
Corse Pay ton has taken a lease on the 
Lexington Opera House and will install 
a stock company, opening Tuesday, April 
24, with "Hit-the-Trail Holliday." 



JANE DARWELL IN SEATTLE 

Seattle, Wash., April 13. — Jane Dar- 
weU, formerly of the Alcazar Stock Co., 
San Francisco, is a new member of the 
Wilkes Co., opening this week. 



MISS ARNOLD QUITS SPOKANE 

Spokane, Wash., April 13. — Jessie 
Arnold closed last Saturday night as lead- 
ing lady of the Wilkes Players at the 
American Theatre in "In Wyoming." 



MISS WOODWARD'S BROTHER DOES 

Paul Edward Woodward, brother of 
Florence" Woodward, a stock actress, died 
March 28. 



BRYANT CO. POSTPONES OPENING 
PiTTSBrjBGH, April 16. — The Marguerite 
Bryant Players, under the management of 
W. Hedge Holmes closed their second sea- 
son at the Empire Theatre Saturday night 
and open April 23 at the Grand Opera 
House, Youngstown, O., for a limifpa run 
of six weeks owing to their opening June 
4 for the summer at Lakemont Park, Al- 
toona, Pa. The company was announced 
several weeks ago to open in Youngstown, 
April 16, but the opening was deferred. 



KITTY KIRK IN VAUDEVILLE 
Kitty Kirk, who recently closed her per- 
manent stock company at Portsmouth, O., 
is now touring the Orpheum Circuit. Miss 
Kirk's contract expires in June at Los 
Angeles when she will come to New York 
to complete arrangements for the presen- 
tation of a pretentious act from her own 
pen. 



ORCHESTRA FOR FURLONG CO. 

Furlong and DeSaute, managers of the 
Furlong Stock Co., will have an orchestra 
as one of the features. There will be no 
specialties between acts. The company, 
numbering sixteen people, will open the 
latter part of this month. 



GLASER CLOSES IN CLEVELAND 

Cleveland, O., April 14. — The Yaughah 
Glaser Stock Co. has closed its engage- 
ment at the Colonial Theatre and Mr. 
Glaser is at present resting at Muldoon's, 
White Plains, N. X. It is believed the 
closing. is only temporary and the company 
may re-open soon. 



DALLEY TO HAVE TENT CO. 

Shawnee, Okla., April 13.— The Ted 
Dalley Stock Co. has closed its en- 
gagement here and Mr. Dalley will open a 
company under canvas about May ?, some- 
where in Kansas. 



BOSTON TO HAVE NEW COMPANY 

Boston, April 14. — Robert Williams is 
planning to open a stock company at the 
Grand Theatre here May 15 with "Mile- 
a-Minute Kendall." Frank Rowan will 
play leading roles. 



JANE URBAN IN SACRAMENTO 

Sacramento, CaL, April 14. — Jane 
Urban, formerly leading lady of the Wilkes 
Players at the American Theatre, win open 
an indefinite engagement with a stock com- 
pany here to-morrow. 



MILLER APPOINTED MANAGER 

Patekso.n-, N. J., April 14. — J. Fred 
Miller has been appointed resident man- 
ager of the St Claire Playhouse, with Col. 
Frederick Ellsworth as business manager. 

RUTH GATES WITH SPOKANE CO. 

Spokane, Wash., April 13. — Ruth Gates 
is the new leading lady of the Wilkes Play- 
ers at the American Theatre, having open- 
ed Monday in "Seven Keys to Baldpate." 

MADGE F.l.ISON CO. OPENING 
The Madge Elison Stock Co. open their 
spring and summer season April 9. They 
have Deen laying off the last two weeks 
in Lent making a few changes. 

GLASS CO. MOVES 

San Diego, Cal, April 13. — The Joseph 
D. Glass Stock Co. has moved here from 
El Paso, Tex., and will remain for a per- 
manent Summer engagement. 



FLORENCE GERALD IN NEW YORK 

Florence Gerald has just returned to 
New York after a season in stock with 
the Poll Co. at Washington, D. C. 



ROBINS TO HAVE TORONTO CO. 

Toronto, Can., April 15. — Edward 
Robins .will again have a stock company 
in- this city, to open early in May. 



April 18, 19tf 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



MANY CIRCUSES 

READY FOR 

THE_ROAD 

WAR DOES NOT DETER MGRS. 



In less than two weeks 'the circus sea- 
son of 1917 will be in full blast with 
every manager almost hoping against 
hope that it may prove better than last 
year. 

Despite the war scare managers have 
gone ahead and are willing to at least 
take the gambler's chance. There are 
practically no new shows hitting the trail 
this summer, but some of those that made 
their initial bow last season and fell by 
the wayside are out again, but under new 
management, and with strong financial 
backing will make a try for some of the 
money supposed to be waiting for the 
circus, both large and small. 

Of the old etandbys there is not much 
new that can be said. They' retain the 
same heads of departments and most of 
the same performers. As usual, the two 
bjg ones — the Barnum & Bailey and the 
ELnglings — divide the country. The Hagen- 
back & Wallace show will this spring 
again invade the East as far as Pennsyl- 
vania, there to buck up against not only 
the Barnum show but the Robinson and 
Sells-Floto as well. 

The Wallace show this season goes out 
again with Billie Curtis as general super- 
intendent. 

The Robinson Ten Big Shows will en- 
deavor this season to re-establish itself in 
the good graces of the people. In the 
South this show is a household word, and 
fears opposition from none of them, but, 
until Jerry Mugivan and Bert Bowers got 
control of it, and thoroughly reorganized 
it, it had lost most of its prestige. This 
season it goes out combined with the 
Howe's London show's equipment and a 
lot of new stuff. 

George Moyer is general agent. They 
open in the South, play a few big ones, 
then come up through Tennessee and into 
Ohio before hitting Pennsylvania. They 
follow the Wallace show into Cincinnati, 
which city, by the way, will get four big 
shows this spring. It is said that the 
Robinson show will break in no new ter- 
ritory this season, but confine itself to 
the sections where its name is still good. 

Just what E. B. Gentry will do with 
the Sells-Floto show remains to be seen 
He has surrounded himself with most of 
his old assistants. The old original Gen- 
try show, under Ben Austin's guidance, 
will go out from Memphis, Tenn., and 
pursue the same policy that made it fa- 
mous for so many years. 

James Patterson, with the Gollmar show 
title and most of the show's generals, will 
make a bid for the patronage of the Mid- 
dle West. He has a new outfit, and as 
he has the use of the title only for this 
season from the Gollmar's it is expected 
that he will try and make his name good 
in the sections he visits. 

The Coup & Lent show will go out 
again this season, opening in Dixon, 111. 
This show made good last summer, and 
it was not bad business that caused it to 
close. The old owners have retired and a 
well-known Southern showman has put 
$42,000 into the treasury to make it a go. 
It will take the place of a show placed in 
quarters for good. It is said that Thomas 
F. Wiedman, of Kit Carson fame, will 
also have a bit in the show, and that its 
route lays west of the Mississippi. 

The old Cook & Wilson show goes out 
as the Cook Bros.' show, with Bobby Foun- 
tain at the helm as general manager and 
superintendent, and it will invade the 
East again. It had strenuous opposition 
with the Sparks show last summer, and 
finally gave up the ghost. This season 




Cook is going to take another chance, and 
will in all probability make a go of it. 

Andrew Downie, down at Havre de 
Grace, is preparing to take the road again 
after a long rest caused by the infantile 
paralysis scare of last fall. He has prac- 
tically the same outfit of last season, al- 
though thoroughly repaired and repainted, 
and has Harry Allen to look out for his 
interests. It is said that he goes West. 

His former partner, Al F. Wheeler, has 
been out all winter down South with a 
two-car show, and has been making some 
money. He will make no effort to run 
a big one, but will confine himself to his 
present outfit. "* 

The Sparks show goes out with prac- 
tically a new outfit of tents and perform- 
ers, and after spending a short time in 
West Virginia will invade Pennsylvania 
and the East again this season. 

The Cole Bros, and the Al G. Barnes 
are fighting it out already on the coast, 
and both are. making money. They will 
have opposition later from the Yankee 
Robinson show, which makes the Middle 
West again this season. 

CIRCUS MAN'S WILL FOUND 
Chicago, April 10. — A will of Charles 
D. Hageman, one of the owners of the 
Hagenbeck-Wallace circus, who died un- 
expectedly In Mansfield, O., has been 
fonnd, leaving the entire Hageman for- 
tune, estimated at $200,000 to Sarah K. 
Wilson. An effort is being made to locate 
her. The fortune is mostly real estate, in 
Kansas City. 



SPARKS SHOWS 

OPEN CIRCUS 

SEASON 

TO PLAY NORTHERN TERRITORY 



CIRCUS MAN IS BURLESQUE MGR. 

Toronto, Can., April 14. — Fred Busey, 
one of the best known circus men in the 
country, who tried his hand at burlesque 
this season as manager of the Gayety 
Theatre, has proved a capable representa- 
tive of the Columbia Amusement Co. here. 
The honse has done very good business 
under his supervision. 



KAUFFMAN SELLS INTERESTS 

San Diego, Cal, April 14. — Frank 
Kaufman, who had the Zoo at the Ex- 
position, and his wife, La Belle Reena, 
the dancer, have disposed of their inter- 
ests to the Park directors and have taken 
over Flynn Springs, a suburban resort. 



Salisbury, N. C, April 14. — The Sparks 
Circus opened here Wednesday with an en- 
tirely new show, new tents, new perform- 
ances and new people. It is estimated that 
more than ten thousand citizens witnessed 
the big street parade and the tents were 
crowded at both performances. 

The show will play directly North 
through West Virginia, and Pennsylvania 
into New York state and New England. 

Charles Sparks is manager of the show 
and Clifton Sparks treasurer. Others on 
the executive staff include William Mor- 
gan, secretary ; J. C. Kelly, legal adjuster ; 
C. B. Fredericks, assistant and manager 
of concessions ; Bert Mayo, equestrian di- 
rector; Fletcher Smith, press agent back 
with the show ; Cal Towers, manager of 
the annex; Albert Keller, manager of the 
pit attractions; Jack Phillips, bandmaster, 
and Harry Wills, superintendent of re- 
served seats. 

The performance ran for nearly two 
hours and included Woodford's Statue 
horses and dogs ; Frank Decker and Tracy 
Andrews, jugglers ; Frank Lavine and Fred 
Crandall, comedy mule hurdle acta; the 
Wheeler Bros., comedy acrobats ; Myrtle 
Mayo, Bert Mayo, Dolly Eakew and Mer- 
ritt Belew, riders ; an act made op of Louise 
Nelson, on the swinging ladder; Horace 
Laird, on Roman rings, and Miss Webber 
on swinging ladder; Eunice DeMott and 
Margaret Crandall, equestriennes. 

The Gabbetta and Irma Wlnslow, band 
balancing, head balancing and contortions; 
elephants introduced by Lewis Reed and 
Merrit Belew ; Harry Mick in .hoop rolling 
and Vivian McLane on slack wire'; Tiebor's 
seals and sea lions presented by Roy Wes- 
ley; Connors and Irmenia, silver wire per- 
formers; and a contingent of clowns head- 
ed by Jack Klippell are other features. 



MAJOR BURKE DEAD 

Washington, D. C, April 14. — Major 
John M. Burke, for many years associated 
with the late Buffalo Bill as press repre- 
sentative, died here last Thursday from 
pneumonia, aged seventy-four years. Ma- 
jor Bnrke, in the days of his young man- 
hood was a cowboy and in common with 
many of his fellows did scouting duty for 
various officers of the U. S. Army con- 
cerned in Indian wars of the early 70*8. 

In those days Burke was popularly 
known as Arizona Jack and was a chnm 
of John Omohondro, known to the plains 
as Texas Jack. It was through the let- 
ter's association with Wm. F. Cody in 
his frontier play called "The Scout of 
the Plains," that Burke met Buffalo BUL 
Texas Jack was a member of the Cody 
company and he introduced Burke to the 
great plainsman and then began the friend- 
ship between Maj. Burke and Buffalo 
Bill which was to last for more than 40 
years. 

He was engaged as advance agent for 
"The Scout of the Plains" and the suc- 
cessive plays in which Buffalo Bill ap- 
peared. When the Wild West was 
launched Burke became Cody's general 
press and personal representative, a po- 
sition he held up to the death of Buffalo 
Bill last year. 



RUTH LAW TALKS ON WAR 

Ruth Law spoke on her experiences on 
the western war front with the French 
Flying Corps last Friday afternoon at the 
opening of the tea garden at the show 
of the Society of Independent Artists in 
the Grand Central Palace. 



BUFFALO BILL SHOW FOR B'KLYN 

The Buffalo Bill Wild West will have 
its first metropolitan showing week of 
April 30 in Brooklyn, which will be the 
first time it has played around New 
York since Jess Wttlard joined as the fea- 
ture attraction. 



CIRCUS ELEPHANT OPERATED ON 

"Mighty," a huge Asiatic bull elephant, 
with the Barnum & Bailey's Circus, was 
operated upon for the removal of a large 
carbuncle at Madison 'Square Garden last 
week by Harry Mooney, head elephant 
man. 



DIXIE SHOWS OPEN 

Terbe Haute, Ind., April 14. — Com- 
pany B Indiana National Guard will hold 
a street carnival here this week and the 
Famous Dixie Shows have been engaged. 
This is their opening engagement. 



CIRCUS CLOWN SEEKS DIVORCE 

Toledo, O., April 14. — David Clark, a 

~Hrcu 
from*" 



KING LEASES NORFOLK PARK 

Lincoln, Neb., April 13. — Hnrry King, 

who has leased Luna Park, is making plans 

down with tie Barnum A Bailey Circus,^>o uwtall many new features. A big 

has filed a petition for a divorce baaf **lamw* poo l may be built . 

Nellie Clark, a circus dancer. 

MAUD RUTTER JOINS RDiGUNGS 

Chicago, April 13. — Maud Rutter, fa- 
miliar to most pictnre fans because of her 
cowgirl work with the Brady-Fox film 
studio, has joined the Ringllng Circus. 



ADAMS HAS EXHIBIT IN PARK 
Chicago, April 16. — W. B. Adams has. 
arranged to put his "Chinatown", exhibit 
in Riverview Park. Mrs. Adams will 
follow about May 1. 



RJNGUNGS TO ENLARGE SHOW 

Chicago, April 16. — When the Ringllng 
Circus reaches St. Louis — the stop after 
Chicago — an entirely new flotilla of freaks 
for side shows will be assembled. 



CADILLAC TO HAVE NEW PARK 

Cadillac, Mich., April 14. — A new Sum- 
mer park* in course of construction will be 
opened here Decoration Day by the Hoi- 
men Bros. 



THOMPSON WITH SPELLMAN 

"Bill" Thompson will go in advance of 
the Spellman-Kiralfy-Bostock 
Circus this season. 



QUINCY PARK BEING IMPROVED 

Quinct, HL, April 14.— Highland Park 
will open May 5 under the management of 
Messrs. Breinig & Toole. Manager Brelnig 
has recently returned from the North, 
where he booked many features for the 
Summer season. Many Improvements are 
being made at the park, rebuilding and re- 
constructing buildings and erecting new 
ones for the various concessions. 



ALABAMA FAIR ASS'N MEETS 
Birmingham, Ala., April 16. — The Ala- 
bama Association of Fairs will hold its 
annual meeting here April 30, when a con- 
tract will be closed with a carnival com- 
pany and free attractions for the circuit. 
The cities comprising the circuit are Al- 
bertville, Tuscaloosa, Dothan and Troy. 



TORONTO'S PARKS OPENING 

Tokonto, Can., April 16. — The season at 
Hanlon's Point Park will open May 24 
with L. Solman as manager. Scarboro 
Beach Park, under the management of F. 
L. Hubbard, will also open the latter part 
of May and is on the United Booking 
Office Circuit 



SMITH'S 20-IN-l WITH BRUNEN 
K. Frederick Smith, owner and manager 
of the Smith Twenty-in-One Shows has 
signed contracts with Honest John Bremen, 
of the Mighty Doris Shows, to feature his 
Twenty-in-One with that aggregation. 



WYMAN BROS. TO OPEN PARK 

Keene, N. H., April 15. — The Wyman 
Brothers are making preparations to open 
Recreation Park on Memorial Day. The 
usual Summer dances will be staged there 
and bands and orchestras will be booked. 



JEWELL HAS CHARGE OF BAND 

Tehee Haute, Ind., April 14. — Fred 
Jewell will have charge of the Hagenbach- 
Wallace Circus Band again this season. 



DELAVOYE WITH SELLS-FLOTO 

Will Delavoye will be the principal and 
producing clown with the Sells-Floto Cir- 
cus this summer. 



Motorized 



NORFOLK TO PURCHASE PARK 

Norfolk, Neb., April 13. — The Norfolk 
City Council is arranging to purchase 
Athletic Park for a public amusement re- 
sort this Summer. 



CIRCUS BANDMASTER DIES 

Chehalis. Wash., April 13. — O. E. Lar- 
kins, formerly bandmaster with several cir- 
cuses, died here recently. 



LYNN JOINS THONET SHOW 

Loo D. Lynn has returned to the Joseph 
H. Thonet's Great Excelsior Shows ss gen- 
eral agent, 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

RomlM 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Rudolph 5423 



COMSTOCK GETS 
LA SALLE 
THEATRE 

TO DUPLICATE PRINCESS, N. T. 



The New York firm of Elliott, Comstock 
& Gest has acquired control of the La 
Salle Theatre, and will make it the West- 
ern home of their musical comedies of the 
type of "Oh Boy," now playing at the 
Princess Theatre, New York. 

The La, Salle Theatre is one of the 
smaller houses in the Loop district and 
control was taken over by the firm of 
Jones, Linick ft Schaeffer, who were the 
lessees and managed the theatre for sev- 
eral years. It is owned by Anna Sinton 
Taft, of Cincinnati. 

F. Ray Comstock, who had been on a 
tour in the West for a month, closed the 
deal while in Chicago. He also closed with 
George Ade for the musical comedy rights 
of "The College Widow," and is planning 
to use this as the successor of "Oh Boy" 
in New York when that attraction leaves 
the Princess Theatre. 

The firm is also negotiating for similar 
theatres in Boston and Philadelphia, and 
by next season will have a chain of thea- 
tres to play the Princess productions. 

LEWIS BUSY SCOUTING 

Henry Lewis, featured in Anna Held's 
"Follow Me," at the Garrick, is doing 
some "scout" work for Edgar Allan and 
Joseph Hobcrman of New York, who are 
producing through the Fox office. Lewis 
was chiefly instrumental in bringing the 
writers together into the new organi- 
sation. 



GIRL SHOT IN UNION FIGHT 

The old feud between Chicago's rival 
moving picture operators' unions culmi- 
nated in a shooting fracas which nearly 
cost the life of an innocent bystander last 
Saturday night. Frank Brown, business 
agent for one of the unions, and Morris 
Cohn, an examiner for the city electrical 
department, went to the White . Eagle 
Theatre to investigate a report that 
gangsters had tampered with the theatre's 
electrical equipment, f. 

When they arrived the gangsters, who 
are reported to belong to the other union, 
started firing revolvers. Brown and (John 
returned the fire, and one of the bullets 
exchanged hit Martha Woda, a passer-by. 
Physicians say the girl will be crippled 
for life. William Rooney, who was also 
hurt in the fray, was arrested. 



KRAUS PLEADS POVERTY 

"King" Lee Kraus, a Chicago vaude- 
ville agent, swore he was a pauper, when 
cited into the Debtor's Branch • of the 
Municipal Court, last week, by Ader ft 
Ader, on a judgment for $V9, held by the 
Taylor Trunk Works. The claim Is two 
years old. 

JACK HARVEY DIVORCED 

Jack Harvey, of the "Marshall Play- 
ers," secured a divorce from Carrie 
Hamilton in the Circuit Court, last week, 
on the grounds of desertion. Ader ft 
Ader represented Harvey. 

HEALY'S SON FOR NAVY 

Vincent Healy, son of P. J. Healy. 
founder of Lyon ft Healy, Chicago's big- 
gest musical instrument institution, has 
received his commission as lieutenant in 
the naval reserve. 



MRS. GASCOIGNE RECOVERS 

Mrs. Gascolgne, of the Royal Gas- 
coignes, jugglers, has recovered from an 
operation performed in Chicago and will 
work with her husband over the Pantages 

time. 



LEVY ENTERTAINS TOTS 

Bert Levy, the cartoonist, gave an il- 
lustrated travel lecture combined with 
bedtime tales for children, at the Wilson, 
last Saturday. 



MARION & RANDALL FOR VAUDE. 

Mile. Marion and Martinez Randall 
will enter vaudeville, when their contract 
for exhibiting dances at Green Mill Gar- 
den terminates in September. 



PLUGGERS AT OPENING GAME 

Music publishers of this city took ad- 
vantage of the opening of the "Cubs'" 
season at Weeghmann Park as an oppor- 
tunity to plug their songs, and between 
martial airs by the military band, sang 
their popular songs. Harry Newman was 
there with an auto full of pluggers and 
entertained with "For Me and My Gal" 
and a new song and Feist's "Hawaiian 
Butterfly" was played intermittently 
throughout the game by the Illinois Naval 
Reserve Band. 



CORT THEATRE WINS 

Judge Joseph David last week sustained 
the petition of the Cort Theatre for a writ 
of mandamus against the city officials 
who refused to issue a permit for the 
theatre on the ground that it was a party 
to ticket scalping. The theatre's at- 
torneys argued that box office attaches 
could not distinguish between scalpers 
and those who purchase tickets in good 
faith. 



SINGER'S FOUR SONS IN WAR 

Mme. Ernestine Schnmann-Heink has 
four sons who will be affected by the war. 
Her son George Washington is a student 
at Culver academy and may soon enter 
the U. S. Army. Another son, Henry, is 
in our navy. A third, August, is in the 
German navy. The last son, Walter, is 
in the New Jersey National Guard. War 
means a "brother against brother" line-up 
for her family. 



DOT MARSELL FOR AUSTRALIA 

Dot Marsell was given a twenty weeks' 
Australian contract, with an option of 
fifty additional weeks. She is completing 
her time on the Ackerraan-Harris Circuit, 
prior to entering upon the Australian 
route. 



KETTERING PLAY FOR INTERN'L 
John J. Bornero and John Barrett, who 
manage the National Theatre, have ac- 
cepted a new Ralph Kettering play, called 
"The Bawler-out, for production over the 
International Circuit. 



SUMMER STOCK 

AT SEVERAL 

HOUSES 

DRAMA AND MUSIC PROMISED 



There will be at least two dramatic 
stock companies in Chicago this summer. 
There will also be one and perhaps two 
musical stocks. 

Herman Lieb will conduct a summer 
stock company at the Wilson Avenue The- 
atre at the conclusion of its vaudeville 
season. He is now engaging his company 
and promises, when completed, that it will 
include a number of representative play- 
ers who are capable of presenting the 
best productions. He intends to offer 
none but royalty plays of- a class that 
will appeal to the average theatre-goer 
while he will maintain a popular scale of 
admission prices. 

The success of the company at the Wil- 
lard Theatre last summer has created a 
demand for that house in stock circles, and 
tentative arrangements are now being 
made for 1917. 

It is too early for the stock fever to 
strike the "loop" centre, but there are 
rumors afloat that two or three of the 
musical comedy producing managers are 
casting about for likely houses for sum- 
mer productions once the regular season 
comes to an end. 



BAN RACE HATRED PLAYS 

The Illinois State Senate adopted a bill 
last Wednesday prohibiting any play "on 
the stage or in motion pictures" which 
tends to incite race hatred. The measure, 
which was passed in the House under the 
title of "The Jackson Bill," was over- 
whelmingly approved by a vote of 33 to 7. 
Local managers believe this bill is the 
highest demonstration of patriotic senti- 
ment, insofar as the stage is concerned. 
They believe that war-time activity 
against the enemy should not take the 
form of "hate hymns" revealed in the- 
atrical performances which play upon 
popular prejudice. 



BISMARCK STAYS BISMARCK 
The fact that the Kaiserhof Hotel 
changed its name to Hotel Atlantic, as 
soon as war was declared, led to the be- 
lief that all public places with German 
names would make a similar change. 
However, the owners of the Bismarck and 
Bismarck Gardens have decided to take no 
steps in this direction, as yet, because 
their places have gained great reputations 
under this name. They fear a change of 
name would result in decreasing patron- 
age, instead of increasing it. 



BUILDINC MORE THEATRES 

The extreme limits of Chicago's North- 
west side, which was prairie land a fe*5- 
seasons ago, is now the scene of constant ^ performer's names. 

theatre building. Combination policies of\> 

vaudeville and pictures is 'the rule. 



PERFORMERS NOT SLACKERS 

Actors here have not tried to escape 
military service by marrying. The lists 
of those who sought the County Clerk's 
office for a marriage license, when con- 
, scription seemed imminent, revealed no 



LASKY STOPS IN CHICAGO 

Jesse L. Leaky stopped off in Chicago 
last week to see how "Joan the Woman" 
was running at the Colonial. He is on his 
way to the Hollywood (Calif.) studios. 



KENMORE USES "JAZZ" BAND 
The Kenmore Theatre, in the Wilson 
Avenue district, employed a colored band 
to parade in front, playing ragtime selec- 
tions, while a quartette inside sang, to 
stimulate attendance, as a big feature 
movie was unreeled last week. 



LEAVE CABARET FOR VAUDEVILLE 

Chas. Gilmore and Olga Romanoff, 
whose dancing was a feature at Weiss' 
Winter Garden, started their vaudeville 
season at McVickcr's, last week. 



JULIUS SINGER HERE 
Julius Singer, special road .man for the 
"L-Ko" film organization, was in the city 
last week for a brief stay. 



HOLMES WORKS INDIANAPOLIS 

Ned Holmes, of tbe Jones, Linick & 
Schaefer forces, went to Indianapolis, last 
week, to boost "Joan the Woman." 



FULLER SEEKS DIVORCE 
Lew Fuller, vaudeville actor, filed suit 
for divorce against Louise Fuller last 
week 



PRINCETON FIVE ENGAGED 

Turn Brown's Princeton Five were en- 
gaged in Chicago for Montgomery ft 
Stone's new show. 



SUBSEA COMEDY ROUTED 

"The Submarine Attack," which re* 
ceived a favorable reception in Chicago 
recently, started a fifteen weeks' route at 
Davenport, la. The route includes a re- 
turn date at the Lincoln Hippodrome, 
Chicago. 



DKEVS SON IN PLAYLET 

Henry E. Dixey, Jr., is with Dorothy 
Burton in a playlet entitled "Little Dr. 
Love," which was at McVickcr's last week. 
James G. Morton is also in the sketch. 



ACTRESS WEDS FILM MAN 

Laura Roth and John Lukena, who la 
connected with the American Film Co., 
were married at Crown Point last month. 
They are residing in Chicago. 

BRENTON JOINS CAVALRY 
R. R. Brenton, manager for Happy Tre- 
bor, the vaudeville writer, was one of the 
first Chicagoana to join the cavalry when 
the war broke out. 



MORRIS FLECKLES GOES EAST 
Morris Fleckles, head of the Laeuunle 
interests in Chicago, has decided to make 
New York City his permanent home. 

"HIT THE TRAIL" TO CLOSE 
"HH-the-Trail HoHiday" closes next 
Saturday at Auburn, Ind. 

THOMAS' MOTHER BURIED 

St. Loins, Mo., April IS.— Mrs. Imo- 
gene Garrison Thomas, mother of Augus- 
tus Thomas, the playwright, was buried 
here Friday. She was eighty-four years 
old. Thomas arrived here from New York 
in time to attend the funeral. Other sur- 
viving members of the family are Paul, 
Irwin, Alice A. Thomas, and Mrs. Charles 
Austin. 



DIXIE GERARD HONORED - 

As a token of appreciation for having 
sung for the men of the Seventh Regiment 
Armory at their annual review, Dixie 
Gerard, prima donna of the Hippodrome 
show, bas been decorated with the medal 
of the Honor Legion of the Police Depart- 
ment by Commissioner Woods. 



WAYBURN BANKRUPT IN LONDON 

London, England, April 7. — Ned Way- 
burn is in bankruptcy, bis indebtedness 
being £884. The creditors have met at the 
Bankruptcy Buildings under a receiving 
order and the case bas been left in the 
hands of the official Receiver. 



MRS. KELLY TO STAY HERE 

Owing to the present war conditions 
and the unsafety of the seas, Mrs. John 
T. Kelly has decided to remain in this 
country and will not join her new act, 
now in London. 



RITA JOLTVET LEAVES CAST 

Rita Jolivet has withdrawn from the 
cast of "Do Luxe Annie," the dramatisa- 
tion of the Saturday Evening Pott story 
which Arthur Hammerstein is producing, 
and will be succeeded by Jane Grey. 

BIDE DUDLEY AN AUTHOR 

Bide Dudley has published in book form 
his rhymes, "By Diversion," which are 
appearing in the Evening World daily. 
The book was placed on the market last 
week. 



TO PRODUCE "RIP VAN WINKLE" 

"Rip Van Winkle" will be produced late 
next month at the .open air theatre 
known as the Stratford, at Del Mar, Cat, 
with Thomas Jefferson in the title role. 

SHUBERTS ACCEPT NEW PLAY 

The Shuberts have acquired "The Eyes 
of Youth," a play by Charles Gnernon, for 
production. 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



is 



MELODY &J2MM 



EXHIBITORS' LEAGUE 
REBELS AT FEE PAYMENT 



Motion Picture Men's Organization Plan* 

to Bar Composition* of Authors' and 

Composers' Society from Its Houses 

The Motion Picture Exhibitors' League, 
an organization of theatre managers in 
whose houses motion pictures are featured, 
is holding weekly meetings, with a view 
of discovering some means by which the 
payment of the Authors' and Composers' 
Society fee can be avoided. 

The society, which has under the law 
the right to levy any fee it believes 
equitable, decided that the picture houses 
be taxed tflO per year for the right to 
perform the music of the society's mem- 
bers. 

At the last meeting of the motion pic- 
ture men, it was discovered that while 
practically all of the local publishers and 
writers were members of the composers' 
society, there were some who were not 
and a committee was appointed to look 
into the matter. This committee soon 
learned the names and addresses of the 
Arm's which do not belong to the society 
and it is reported are making arrange- 
ments whereby only the compositions 
published by those houses which are not 
members of the Society of Composers and 
Publishers will be played in the motion 
picture houses. This, if followed out will 
relieve the managers from the payment 
of the 960 yearly fee which the society has 
levied against the picture houses. 

According to the motion picture men 
there is in the catalogues of the music 
publishers who do not belong to the 
authors' and composers' society over five 
thousand publications suitable for per- 
formance in their theatres and this being 
the case, they can get along for a con- 
siderable length of time without playing 
the compositions for which they must pay 
a fee. 

Several members of the Society of Au- 
thors, Composers and Publishers expressed 
themselves as being greatly surprised at 
the action of the morion picture theatre 
owners, as the fee exacted was bo small, 
amounting to but little more than a dollar 
a week. For this small amount the pic- 
ture theatre managers could have per- 
formed in their amusement places the 
choice of all musical comedy and light 
opera successes . as well as thousands 
of standard and popular numbers. Ac- 
cording to one of the society's members, 
the idea of placing the fee at such a small 
figure was in order that the picture houses 
would not feel that they were in any way 
being imposed upon, although the law 
granted the society unlimited power. 

WITMARK SONGS REVIVED 

None of the new so-called patriotic 
songs have got anything on some of the 
older ones that the public Is already fa- 
miliar with. Now is the time when real 
live songs of this character are as hard 
to find as they are greatly in demand. 
None published in' recent yean possess 
more of the real qualities than two £rom 
the catalog of M. WItmark A Sons, which 
the existing conditions have suddenly 
aroused Into new life. These are "For 
Dixie and Uncle Sam" and "You'n Be 
There," both of them with music by 
Ernest R. Ball, and each of them a sore 
winner on any bin. The element of cheap 
clap-trap is happily absent from both 
these songs, and they fit the occasion and 
circumstances perfectly just now. New 
editions are now ready and the publishers 
are in a position to meet adequately the 
inevitable demand for them that has be- 
come quite insistent. 



EDVINA SINGS THE "TRAIL" SONG 

At the concert at the New York Hip- 
podrome Sunday night, a sensation was 
caused by the singing of "There's a Long, 
Long Trail" by Madame Louise C. Ed- 
vlna, the well-known prima donna. Prior 
to her singing of the song, one of her 
representatives addressed the vast audi- 
ence and gave a very interesting explana- 
tion of the story of this remarkable 
song— the haunting, melodic march suc- 
cess of the twentieth century. He told 
how it baa come to be the great song of 
the Allied trenches in Europe, where its 
memorable strains have superseded all 
others in the affections of the Tommies. 
There came a time when the boys leaving 
home and those in the field needed a 
successor to "Tipperary" that would have 
as universal appeal as that popular 
favorite. They found this successor in 
"There's a Long, Long Trail," and the 
success of the latter is even greater than 
that of "Tipperary." Thus keyed to a 
pitch of interest, the big Hippodrome 
audience sat literally spell-bound when 

Madame Edvina sang the "Trail" song, 
and the applause that followed swept the 
great auditorium in one unanimous wave 
of enthusiasm. "There's a Long, Long 
Trail" is an epoch-making song — there is 
no room for doubt on that point, and M. 
Witmark & Sons, its publishers, are over- 
whelmed by the demand for it from 
every quarter. 



REVIVING COHAN'S "FLAG" SONG 

The Maurice Richmond Music Co., has 
during the past few weeks received so 
many requests for the George M. Cohan 
song "You're a Grand Old Flag," that it 
has been issued In professional form and 
orchestrations printed. A number of the 
singers now using it, say that it is re- 
ceived even more enthusiastically than 
during the time of its first popularity. 



NEW HARRIS-MORGAN SONG 

Will J. Harris and Carey Morgan have 
Just completed a new song called "In My 
Bamboo Bungalow 'Neath the Willow 
Tree." The melody is quits the best that 
the talented Morgan has yet turned out, 
which is "going some" as those whoknow 
"My Own Ions," "My Hawaiian Sun- 
shine" and other numbers will agree. 
Harris's lyric swings along nicely with 
the melody and tells a story. Jos. W. 
Stern ft Co., the publishers, are rushing 
the copies to completion. 



"HIS LITTLE WIDOWS" FOR N. Y. 

The notable success of the G. M. An- 
derson-L. Lawrence Weber production 
"His Little Widows," is by the way of 
being a double triumph for Jos. W. 
Stern ft Co. Not only does this firm pub- 
lish all the music of the piece, bat it 
was through their Play Department, un- 
der the personal direction of Henry B. 
Stern, that the play was placed with 
Messrs. Anderson and Weber. 

"Hla Little Widows" has attained so 
signal a success out of town that there 
can now be no question of the good judg- 
ment of all concerned in its production. 
It' comes to the Astor Theatre, New York, 
toward the end of the month. 



NEW WINTER GARDEN SONGS 

Dolly Connolly, who will be seen in the 
new Winter Garden production, will in- 
troduce two new songs by her talented 
husband, Percy Wenrich. Both will be 
published by Leo Feist. 

SOME HARRIS NUMBERS 

Among the Chas. K. Harris publica- 
tions which sre scoring big are: "You 
Came, You Saw, Yon Conquered;" "If a 
a Long, Long Time Since I've Been 
Home;" "When the Bugle Calls;" "Love 
Me Little, Love Me Long;" and "At the 
Hula Hula Kail." 



EARL CARROLL'S PREDICTION 

Earl Carroll, who late last fall made a 
prediction .that by April 16 there would 
be at least three of Ma musical produc- 
tions running In New York, was one-third 
right. 



WILL FEATURE HARRIS SONGS 

Wllla Holt Wakefield, who has been 
introducing the new Harris song "A 
Study in Black and White" with much 
success has accepted two new numbers 
from Mr. Harris and will introduce them 
in her act next week. "A Study in 
Black and White" continues to be the 
feature of her clever vaudeville offering. 

PAULL'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

B. T. Paul], the new march king, has 
in his "America Forever," one of the best 
patriotic march songs published in years. 
The number is a vocal arrangement of the 
famous "America Forever," a march 
which has long been a favorite, the coun- 
try over. The lyric, by H. A. Freeman, 
is of noble sentiment, finely constructed 
and anyone in need of a sure encore 
winner will do well to sing the number. 



"M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I" RELEASED 

Since the ■releasing of "M-I-S-8-I-S- 
8-I-P-P-I," and "Some time," the William 
Jerome offices have been beselged by 
throngs who want to take advantage of 
the opportunity to secure these two won- 
der songs, as "Billy" aptly describes them. 



OPTIMISTIC OVER ART MUSIC 

Saul H. Bornstein, business manager of 
the Art Musio, Lie, declares that this com- 
pany win "turn out the but word in high 
class musio" and prophesies that a couple 
of years should find them the leader in 
their field of activity. 

TRIANGLE MGR. IN TOWN 

S. L. Rosenbsnm, manager of the Tri- 
angle Music Pub. Co. of New Orleans, 
La., is in New York and is contemplating 
opening professional offices in this city. 
The Triangle publications are already 
meeting with success in this section of the 
country end Mr. Rosenbaum believes that 
two or three of his numbers could by 
professional work in this city be mads 
big hits. 



"BUBBLES" BURSTING BIG 
Practically every hotel, restsurant and 
cabaret orchestra In New York is now 
playing Silvio Heln's sensational instru- 
mental hit, "Bubbles," and the Carl Mllle 
gram forces declare that it looks like the 
biggest hit of its kind since "Hiawatha." 



VON TtLZER'S QUARTETTE 

Harry Von Tilzer has a quartette of 
successful songs in "Lonesome," "On the 
South Sea Isle? "Just the Kind of a Girl," 
and "Love Will Find the Way." 

WENRICH'S NOVELTY SONG 

Howard Johnson and Percy Wenrich 
have Just completed a novelty number ' 
which is being taken up by scores of the 
best vaudeville singers, all of whom are 
enthusiastic over its possibilities. It la 
called "Where Do You Go From Here?" 
and is published by Leo Feist. 

ESTELLE JEWELL IS SECY. 

Estelle Jewel, formerly with The Tune- 
ful Yankee,'' Is now secretary to Charles 
Miller, president of the Carl Mfllegram 
Publishing Company, Inc. 



OLMAN TO REMAIN IN NEW YORK 

Abe Olman, the Chicago writer whose 
novelty song "Oh I Johnny," Is on* of the 
season s big hits, is planning to make his 
home in New York. Two of his latest 
compositions win be held in the new 
Winter Garden production. 



A NEW COMEDY SONG 

The Two Jacks, Yellen and Glogau, wish 
to announce that they have written a new 
comedy song which they will release very 
shortly to the public entitled "You Can't 
Ten the Mothers from the Daughters.'' 
The boys admit that it is a great song 
and wish to make the announcement else 
somebody else beats them to It. The 
boys wish to state that their Song is fully 
protected by copyright. 



Sharps and Flats 

By TEDDY MORSE 



Trouping through Tennessee for a few 
days on a single track railway, doing one 
night stands. That sure is some country. 
Peach trees with their lavender blossoms, 
apple trees all white, alfalfa a foot high, 
girls all sweet and summery, men smiling 
and polite, the world famed Southern 
hospitality on tap everywhere you go. 
Autos as thick as flies about honey, hotel 
menus tell you which are fresh and which 
are canned vegetables, flowers oa eaoh 
table in the dining room, moving picture- 
like cabins every where. Self reliant 
women motor drivers a common sight. No 
wonder the song writer takes bis titles 
from this country. Wonderful hills and 
valleys, beautiful waterfalls and rippling 
brooklets, marvelous sunsets, and peace 
and plenty most everywhere. The war 
spirit is at fever heat here. Young men 
and boys drill in the main streets of 
Chattanooga, an example for the slacker 
to see. The strains of Dixie bring the 
audiences to their feet with a yell. Ah 
reckon yo* all No'thcners doan know how 
sweet that there soft, southern style of 
speech is. And what a sting it can carry 
if aroused. If you ever get a chance, be 
sure and visit Dixie. It will be worth 
your while. 

After tbey brought him to in the hos- 
pital, they held a consultation as to what 
manner of death to deal out to him, but 
they decided to let him live. Here's what 
he did. Going into a music stors hs sidled 
up to the counter and asked the clerk far 
a copy of the song they were playing in 
all the theatres. Couldn't remember the 
title. It wss so good it made everybody 
stand up. It starts off something like 
this, "Ob, say can you seel" 



Here's how they got the name of that 
popular summer drink, that some say Is 
full of dope. It seems Kohler, who wrote 
a method for the teaching of the piano 
that has had an enormous sale, and is 
famous the world over, waa noted for his 

Slendid memory. He wss giving an ex- 
bition of It one day, whan his listener 
remarked: "You certainly have a lot in 
your Coco, Kohler I" 

Including the introduction, vamp, verse 
and chorus of a 4-4 song, there are about 
1,100 notes: When Mr. Al Gerber, who 
had nothing to do with ths success of the 
Rosary mentioned this, the breathless 
listeners remarked as one, "Well, what of 
Itt" ' 



Billy Day, the Boston Bean, burst In 
upon downtrodden New York again. This 
time gaily bedecked with the latest pinch- 
back, and a catalog of three pieces. For 
Billy is a musio publisher for sure. 

Mort Green sells music, and a lot of it 
for James Brockman. Mort figures a 
mustache is part of a good salesman's 
make-up. 

Andy Sterling, one of the real rhymesters 
of ths song world, is proving his value to 
the Morris Co. by wrung, as always, good 
songs. 

Marvin Lee, the Max Wlnalow of the 
' Forster Music Co., saya he is putting over 
bits for his Boss. If s true, too. 

If s Just as good for peace as well as 
war time. "Obey the law and keep your 

mouth shut." 



Remarking again, for no reason at an, 
where have the peace songs went? 

"Get off my foot" is the name af a 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



THE MOST SENSATIONAL NOVELTY 

Ever Shown in America 

GEORGES MARCH 



IN 



"The Wild Guardians" 

A Wordless Melodramatic Playlet 



including 



f OUR JEROCIOUS JUNGLE LIONS 



The Talk aid Thrill of Every Gty Wherever It Has Appeared 



This Marvellous Attraction Holds the Record of 
Salaries Ever Paid 

$25,000 - $25,000 - $25,000 

For One Single Performance 



Routed Indefinitely By 

UNITED BOOKING OFFICES and ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 



Closing the Show, But Holding the Audience in Their Seats 



Now at B. F. Keith's Orpfceum Theatre, Brooklyn 
Next Week at B. F. Keith's Riverside Theatre 



To Mr. Will E. Skid more: 

Please be sore that we are grate f ul for your appreciation of our 
efforts in behalf of your song, 

PRAY S! LIGHTS 11 OUT 

Its success is as much a source of gratification to us as it is to you, 
nor is it in any way a surprise to us. We felt from the start that "Pray 
for the Lights" was an assured bit. And now we are just as certain that 
your new number, 

. IT TAKES A LONG, TALL 

BROWNSKIN GAL 

TO MAKE A PREACHER LAY HIS BIBLE DOWN 

is going to enjoy a success even greater than did your older song. L. 
Wolfe Gilbert, too, says ifs a MIGHTY HIT, and he should know. He 
has written some mighty bits himself. And we are perfectly confident 
that your other six songs: 

WHEN MY GREAT GRAND-DADDY AND MY 

GREAT GRAND-MAMMYPSEDhTO CUDDLE 

AND COO IN A COCOANUT TREE 



SING ME THE MELODY OF LOVE 



THEM DOGGON'D TtlFLIN' BLUES 



MY HEART yJSr HARBOR OF LOVE 



ACROSS i LOVE'S GREAT DIVIDE 

and 

I NEVER ASKED cSSe TO THIS WORLD 



will all take their places with the biggest successes that ever graced the 
Stern catalogue. 

We thank you sincerely for the kindly sentiments expressed in your 
open letter of April 2nd, and we wish to express our hope that we may 
have many more Skidmore numbers in the future. For the present, we 
are convinced that in your seven new songs we have seven new hits. 



APRIL 8th, 1917. 



Tours faithfully, 

JOS. W. STERN & CO. 



Professional Copies and Orchestrations of all of the above numbers 

may be had of 

JOS. W. STERN &. CO. 
I* WOLFE GILBERT, Prof. Mgr., 1556 Broadway, New York. 
MAX J. STONE, 145 No. Clark St, Chicago, I1L 
E. S. FLORENTINE, 111 Kearney St, San Francisco, CaL 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

Manager Olympic Theatre 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Mr. JAMES Q. MORTON 

Supporting Dorothy Burton in "Little Doctor Love" : 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




EIGHT SHOWS TO 

CLOSE ON 

APRIL 21 

ALL REPORT GOOD SEASONS 

April 21st will be a big closing day on 
the American Burlesque Circuit, according 
to the plans of at least eight managers who 
intend bringing the seasons of their com- 
panies to a halt on that date. Several 
others have considered the advisability of 
doing so, but have not announced their de- 
cision as yet. 

The season now drawing to a close has 
been one of the most prosperous in the his- 
tory of the circuit 

Those scheduled to cease operations are 
the "Follies of 1917," at the Gaiety, 
Brooklyn ; "The Lid Lifters," at Jersey 
City; "The Grown TJp Babies," at Phila- 
delphia ; "The Tourists," at Worcester: 
"The Parisian Flirts," at Schenectady; 
the "Hello Girls," at Milwaukee; "Broad- 
way Belles," at St Louis; and "The 
Thoroughbreds," at Indianapolis. 

April 28 will see the finish of another 
batch, and but few will remain open for 
the early weeks in May. 



TINY H1LSON GETS CHANCE 

Tobonto, April 16. — While playing the 
Gayety here last week, Owen Martin, the 
straight man, was taken ill with the 
Grippe and confined to his hotel. Herman 
Gibson jumped in and played his part 
while Tiny Hilson, a pony in the show, led 
the several numbers, taking the place of 
Gibson. Miss Hilson is a sister of Violet 
Hilson. 



EXTRA DATES IN BROOKLYN 

Brooklyn will see A. B. C. Burlesque 
longer than originally contemplated, as a 
number of showB will play return dates at 
the Star. "Hello Paris" closes the regular 
season there on April 21 and the "Military 
Maids" and Pat Whites Show are among 
the extended bookings, announced thus far. 



MORE COIN FOR FUND 

Henry G. Jacobs received six hundred 
dollars from Babe Latour, five hundred 
and seventy dollars from Zella Russell 
and four hundred and fifty dollars from 
Harry Koler, the result of collections last 
week with their shows for the Actors' 
Fund. 



RHEA HILL WINS SUIT 
Rh.es, Ball has been reimbursed for ex- 
penses incurred through injuries sustained 
at the Lumberg, Utica, on December 4. 
The suit for damages resulted in a verdict 
for $450. 

ENGAGED FOR STOCK 

Eleanor Revere and Billy McGarry will 
be at the Trocadero, Philadelphia, spend- 
ing their afternoons and evenings during 
this Summer, playing with the Morrow 
Stock. 

NELLIE FENTON DEAD 

Nellie Fenton, well known in the days 
of Harry Morris as a popular burleaquer, 
died April 4 in Chicago. She was a sister 
of Anna Fenton (Mrs. Wm. B. Watson). 

REYNOLDS IS NEW STRAIGHT 
Francis Reynolds is the new straight- 
man with the Globe Trotters, succeeding 
Irving O'Hay, who will go into vaudeville 
with Don Barclay. 

FORM NEW TRIO 

Chick BriggB, Charles Gehan and Walter 
McClam have formed the Burlesque Trio, 
with the Twentieth Century Maids. 

REJOINS SIDMAN SHOW 

Margee Adams has rejoined the Sam 
Sidman Show Chorus. 



VICTOR HYDE MARRIED . 
Victor Hyde was married recently to 
Gulli Karlson. 



"LIBERTY GIRLS" SUFFER 
The Grippe badly handicapped the 
Liberty Girls last week. Rhoda De Voy' 
and iflmnia, Conroy were hit the heaviest 
and were out of the Show during the 
entire week. The show will close June 2 
at Cleveland, O. Mr. Mitchell is writing 
a new book for next season. 



CHORUS GIRL 

BURNED ON 

TRAIN 

ALCOHOL STOVE UPSETS 



HOLD PERFECT FIGURE CONTEST 

Rochester, >. Y„ April 16. — As a 
special feature with the Spiegel Revue at 
the Corinthian, a perfect figure contest will 
be put on for Thursday and Friday, trophy 
cups to be awarded to the winners. 



- FORMING VAUDEVILLE TRIO 
Lillian Smith, of the "Beef Trust," will 
close with the show April 21 at Hoboken 
and will form a new vaudeville act with 
Gus Smith and Jack Stern, how employed 
at Hurty ft Sermon's Theatre. 

REVIEW CLOSES THIS WEEK 

Buffalo, April 16. — The Burlesque Re- 
view, one of the biggest money makers 
of the Columbia Circuit will terminate its 
season at the Gayety, here this week. 



VIOLET HILSON RE-SIGNED 
Violet Hilson has signed up for next 
season with the "Follies of Pleasure." 
The present season will extend well into 
June, the show closing in New York. 

BUCCANEERS MADE GOOD 

Some burlesque gun play by the Lady 
Buccaneers among the audience at the 
Star, Brooklyn, brought in a considerable 
sum for the Actors' Fund. 



JAMES BARTON FOR STOCK 

Roehm and Richards have signed James 
Barton, the Twentieth Century Maids 
Comedian for the Summer Stock at the 
Olympic, New York.- 



Adelaide Madden, nineteen years old, a 
member of the chorus of "The Tempters," 
an American Circuit show, was severely 
burned about the hands and body on 
Sunday while enroute from Philadelphia 
to New York, on a Central Railroad of 
New Jersey train, when an alcohol stove, 
on which she had placed a curling iron, 
upset and set fire to her dress. 

The girl was panic stricken and started 
for the end of the car as the flames 
spread over her clothes. The other people 
in the car became excited and ran in the 
opposite direction. George Betta, an 
actor and a member of the company who 
waa Bitting in the end of the car, however, 
quickly took in the situaiton and as the 
girl was darting past him, threw his over- 
coat over her body and smothered the 
flames just as she fell unconscious to the 
floor. 

The conductor then ordered the train 
stopped at the next station and wanted to 
have Miss Madden removed to a hospital. 
The girl protested against this, saying 
that she had been away from home for 
seven months and would endure the pain 
until she arrived in New York, wiere 
her aunt, Mrs. Lillian M. Brown, of 414 
West One Hundred and Twentieth Street, 
would meet her. 

Upon the arrival of Miss Madden at the 
West Twenty-third Street depot, Mrs. 
Brown was present with her automobile 
and the girl was rushed to Roosevelt 
Hospital where her burns were dressed, 
after which she was removed to the home 
of her aunt 

The physicians at the hospital found 
that the girl was burned on Tier entire 
left side and that her left hand was very 
severely burned. It was said that the in- 
juries were not dangerous but that it 
would be several weeks before Miss Mad- 
den would be able to work again. The 
show is at the Olympic Theatre this week. 



BURLESQUE NOTES 



Elsie Russell mourns the death of her 
father. 



Amy Depusie closed with the Midnight 
Maidens April 2. 

Evans, Dunn and Jarnes have joined 
the "Puss Puss" show. 



Helen Weir is among those to be re- 
tained by George Belfrage for his summer 
Hip Hip Hooray Girls. 



Al Hyde retired from the leader's chair 
with the Twentieth Century Maids. 
Moses Richheim is the new leader. 



Pat White will close his show at the 
Star, Brooklyn, May 5. 



Frank Hanscomb, Clara Gibson and 
Charles Oardon have signed with the Mid- 
night Maidens for another season. 



Hurtig & Seamon have retained Ben 
Small for another season. 



The Bijou Trio close with the Midnight 
Maidens April 14 at the Empire, Brooklyn. 

Dell Lamont of the Bostonians was 
obliged to lay off recently through illness. 

Agues Deering of the Sightseers was 
hurt by a fall on the stage of Miner's, 
Bronx. 



The "Burlesque Review" will close at 
Rochester, N. Y., May 5. Sid Rankin, the 
man ahead, will get through on April 28. 

Gladys Sears is booked for the stoek 
at the Trocadero, Philadelphia. Harry 
Kelly and Jack Miller will also appear 
there. 



Adeline Francis, formerly with Sam 
Howe's show, joined the Midnight Maid- 
ens April 9. 

Ferns, Bigelow and Meehan will go into 
vaudeville. Grace King will also be heard 
in vaudeville. - 



May Vincent, now playing at the Cen- 
tral Opera House, New York, will act 
as prima donna for one of Jacobs ft Jer- 
mon's shows next season. 



Mae McCormack has replaced Martha 
Richards as ingenue with the Cherry 
Blossoms. Miss Richards succeeded Helen 
Van Buren as prima donna. Frankle 
Niblo remains aa the soubrette. 



FLORIDA QUITTING BURLESQUE 
Buffalo, April 15. — George Alabama 
Florida wil close his season in advance 
of the Spiegel Revue, May S, to start on 
bis carnival season. He will return early 
in August to the Max Spiegel staff. 



STOCK AT GAYETY, PHILA. 

Philadelphia, April 16. — Joe Howard 
will run a summer stock season at the 
Gayety here, at the close of the regular 
season. 

NEW "PASSING SHOW" APRIL 26 

"The Passing Show of 1917" will be 
seen for the first time April 20 at the 
Winter Garden with a cast including De 
Wolf Hopper, Jefferson De Angells, Irene 
Franklin, Burton Green, Chic Sale, Nat 
Can-, Marie Nordstrom, Tom Lewis, Clark 
and Bergman, Johnny Dooley and Yvette 
Rugel and John T. Murray. "The Show 
of Wonders" closes at the Winter Garden 
Saturday, and the house remains dark 
the first part of the following week. 

PRIZE PLAY CAST FULL 

Boston, April 16. — The cast engaged by 
John Craig for the Harvard prise play, 
"The Year of the Tiger," to be produced 
at the Castle Square Theatre next Mon- 
day, includes Josephine Victor, William B. 
Mack, Florence Martin, Robert Knight 
Graham Velsey, Elizabeth Hunt, Edwin 
Foeburg and Robert Lowe. 



NEW FROUC NEXT MONDAY 
Beginning next Monday evening, a new 
edition of Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic, by 
Gene Buck and Dave Stamper, will be pre- 
sented on the. New Amsterdam Theatre 
Roof. The scenic effects have been de- 
signed by Joseph Urban, the production 
staged by Ned Wayburn. 



CORRICAN'S SON ENLISTS 
Emmet Corrigan, Jr., last week enlisted 
for service in the navy, and was detailed 
to the battleship Arkansas. His father, 
who recently took out citizenship papers, 
lias placed his motor boat, "Sea Breeze," 
at the disposal of the U. S. Government. 

CAMERON SISTERS ENGAGED 

The Cameron Sisters, who scored a suc- 
cess in dancing roles in "So Long, Letty," 
at the Shubert Theatre, are dancing at 
the "Justine Johnstone Club," which 
opened last week in the Forty-fourth 
Street Theatre Building. 

CONEY NEED NOT DIM LIGHTS 

Washington, April 14. — The lights at 
Coney Island, Far Rockaway, or at any 
of .the seashore resorts on the Atlantic 
Coast need not be dimmed yet, according 
to the report of Secretary Daniels of the 
Navy Department 



FRIARS TO FROUC APRIL 22 

The next of the series of Friars' Frolics 
at the Monastery will be given Sunday 
evening, April 22. A bill of playlets and 
specialties will be presented under the 
direction of Chief Frolicker James Mont- 
gomery. 



RUBENS IS WELL AGAIN 

Jose Rubens, of the Washington Square 
Players, has recovered from an illness 
which kept him ont of the cast for a con- 
siderable time, and is now appearing 
regularly again at the Comedy Theatre. 

LUCY COTTON GUEST OF HONOR 

Lucy Cotton, appearing as Betty Baa- 
com in "Turn to the Right," at the Gaiety 
Theatre, was the guest of honor of the 
Drama Comedy Club at its meeting Mon- 
day at the Hotel Aster. 

TO ENTERTAIN OLD ACTORS 

The guests of the Actors' Fund Home oa 
Staten Island will be entertained at today's 
matinee performance of "Pals First" 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



■■F 



CALLED YOU 



Cleaning Up All Along the Line! 

WORDS BY HOWARD JOHNSON AND GRANT CLARKE 



A Rare Combi 

MUSIC BY JIMMIE MONACO 

$02 



Forget the Hit you were yesterday — Keep busy and 
morrow! Do that! Sing "Feist Songs" and you can' 



THE BIGGEST JHIT IN THE COUNTI 

AT DO YOU WAN Tl 

AT ME FOR IF THEY DOl 

Word, by HOWARD JOHNSON and JOE 

This wonderful -number, originally introduced by Henry Lewis in Anna Held's "Follow Me" musical production, scoring thei 




IN ORDERING JUSTS 



Here are the current "Feist Hits:" "Silver Bay," "I Know I Got More Than My 

Ireland Must Be Heaven, for My Mother Came from There," "Way Out Yonder in tfc| 
that New Ballad, "Won't You Give Me a Chance to Love You?" and the novelty hit, 1 





The Sensational Hawaiian Novelty Song Hit! Sweeping 

i*~ b, george a-uttle.- THE SONG RAGE, WITH THE INFECTIOUS,] 






vW 



f SAN FRANCISCO SBf 

5^^ PANTAGES BUILDING -=W»3 




CHICAGO i 

GO. H. BUILDING 




135 W. 44ft S] 

^ST. LOUIS 7 1 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ETHEART 



[ion off Exquisite Melody and Delightfully Original Lyric 

IN ORDERING JUST SAY " SWEETHEART " 

1—— 



>e a hit to-day and make preparations to make a hit to- 
wrong then you'll always be a hit! "Facts is Facts!" 



AND THIS IS SOME BIG COUNTRY!! 



MAKE THOSE EYF 

|T MEAN WHAT THEY SAY? ■■ 

:ARTHY. MojJc by JIMMIE MONACO 

iig hit caught the fickle fancy of the public to such an extent that we had to release it— Go to it Boy— If s the one bis hit! 

•want TUAsr rvre •• * » 



•WANT THOSE EVES.' 



re," "If I Had a Son for Each Star in Old Glory, Uncle Sam, I'd Give Them All to You," 
»lden West," "Honolulu, America Loves You," "Everybody Loves a Jazz Band." Also 
Your Eye on the Girlie You Love." 




toss the Continent Like a Tornado! Nothing Can Stop It! 

IONEY-SWEET, UNIQUE, CROONY MELODY! m»«c b, billy baskette «j joe santly 



<35§ 



irfW 



|l§ss 




INC 

EET, NEW YORK 
& OLIVE STREET 



BOSTON 

laiTREMONT STREET 




PHILADELPHIA 

BROAD 8c CHERRY 






B 






20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



JEAN ADAIR 



IN 



»« _ _w 



"Maggie Taylor— Waitress 

Direction Lvwia & 0— <SB 



VAUDEVILLE FEATURE ACTS 



FRANK STANLEY 



IN 



"Where's The Finish" 



Representative 
BERT GOLDBERG 



DIRECT FROM 
THE NUT FACTORY 




HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 

AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 
U. B. O— BIG TUB 



Stuart Barnes 



Direction JA3. E. PLUNXETT 



MARY FORREST 



With ADELE BLOOD AND CO. 



EMMA STEPHENS 

BOOKED SOLID DIRECTION HARRY FITZGERALD 



DAINTY MARIE 

VENUS OF THE AIR 

W to h«. to &• Known to Futon Under Iter Own Nam* 

(DAINTY) MARIE MEEKER 

DIRECTION PAT CASEY 



A Different Comedy Act 



ALLEN AND MORTON 

Feel, fiddle and Voice In Fob and Folly 



WORKING FOR U. B. O- 



DIR. CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



The Yaltos 



Dainty Dancing Duo 

DIRECTION GENE HUGHES. INC. AND JO. PAIGE SMITH 



EDDIE VINE 

In "A Stadyjn Songs" 

Direction PAUL ALLE1M 



MRS. THOS. WHIFFEN 6 CO. 

AND PEGGY DALE WHIFFEN 

PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 

In "The Golden Night" 



NOLAN and NOLAN 

JESTING JUGGLERS 

Direction NORMAN JEFFRIES 



SUPREME NEW OPERATIC OFFERING 

Mme DOREE'S CELEBRITIES 



Direction STOKER * BIERBAUER 



CAMILLE PERSONI 

THE "BUTTERFLY GIRL" OF VAUDEVILLE 



ARTHUR HAVEL & CO. PLAYMATES 

By WILL M. CRESSY 

DIRECTION JAMES E. PUUNKBTT 



ED. F. REYNARD 



BIANCA 

la a Sarin af Draatatlr 

Duim P mnn - 



MUE. BIANCA! 
- ED. F. 



REYNARD 

TT>. VaatrBaqofal 8 tlmn 

to "BEFORE THE COURT." 



MARGARET YOUNG 



DIRECTION MAX HART 



IN VAUDEVILLE 1 



J 

l 




NOW ON OUR TENTH WEEK. Meeting with tre- 
mendous success on Loew Circuit. April 16-17-18, 
Plaza, Springfield, Mass; April 19-20-21 , Portland, 
Portland, Me. 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



DR. GUSTAV j. E. T1ECK 

Probably you have never heard of the 
"Septum Club," nevertheless, it exists. Its 
members axe the most enthusiastic and 
most grateful of any club in existence. 
They include many of the most prominent 
personages in the amusement world and 
their president, the founder of the club, is 
Dr. Gustav J. E. Tieck, the well known 
throat and nose specialist. 

Illness is unquestionably one of the 
greatest misfortunes that befall us, and 
many an illness has its origin in the nose 
or throat and it is through his treatment 
of such sufferers that Dr. Tieck has in- 
creased the membership of the "Septum 
Club." 




Dr. Gustar J. E. Tieck 

. A notable case in point is that of 
George MacFarlane of the "Miss Spring- 
time" Co., which has just closed a long 
stay at the New Amsterdam Theatre. It 
was necessary for him to undergo a nasal 
operation and, of course, feared that it 
would entail his absence from the cast of 
"Miss Springtime." 

MacFarlane's fears were groundless, 
however. Dr. Tieck admitted him to full 
membership of the "Septum Club," — in 
other words performed a surgical opera- 
tion upon his nose and the next evening, 
instead of lying on a hospital bed, Mac- 
Farlane was singing his role in the opera, 
as if nothing had happened between that 
and the preceding performance. . 

Prominent in the memberhsip of the 
"Septum Club" are: Martin Beck, Morris 
Meyerfeld, Basil Ruysdale, Fontani Far- 
rari, Ernest K. Ball, Maude Lambert, 
Chauncey Olcott, Julius Witmark and 
many others. 

Dr. Tieck combines with, a rare profes- 
sional skill. a very pronounced and engag- 
ing personality. It is quite impossible to 
forget him once you have met him. He 
is one of those rare people to meet whom 
is to wish that with them life could be 
indefinitely . extended. Meantime, the 
membership of the "Septum Club" is 
growing by leaps and bounds and its 
president is a very busy and a very happy 
man. 



McINTOSH FREE FROM DEBT 

Burr Mcintosh was last week freed by 
Federal Judge Julius M Mayer from 
debts aggregating $12,037, which he owed 
last fall when he filed a voluntary peti- 
tion in bankruptcy. He was discharged 
without any opposition from his creditors. 
This is Mcintosh's second time in bank- 
ruptcy, his first having been in 1908. 

GOLDBERGS' BOOKING AGAIN 

Lou and Bert Goldberg are again united 
and - are booking vaudeville acts in the 
office of their brother', Jack Goldberg. Ben- 
son Lang is outride representative for the 
concern and Lew Shurr, formerly with 
Jack Goldberg, is secretary. 



URBAN LEASES HOUSE 

Joseph Urban, the scenic artist, has 
leased for a term of years a house in Ton- 
kers, which is to be' entirely renovated and 
re-decorated by himself. 



THE TWO STARS 

ROCKWELL 

AND 

£| WOOD 

LATE OF 

The Milky Way 

NOW 

Keith's, Boston 



[ 



HEADLINE ACTS 



1 



MERCEDES 



ALVIN and 

ANDY 

WILLIAMS 

Bits from Songland 

Majestic, Paterton, April 16-18. 
Bijou, Philadelhia, April 19-21 

Direction NORMAN JEFFERIES 



THE 

NAGYFYS 



PrweaUag a 



Pyrotechnical Novelty 

Direction All. T. Wilton 



SLAYMAN ALI 

<: Prodncer of si 
ORIENTAL NOVELTIES 

754 Sth Ave* New York 
Phone Bryant 89S0 



PAUL DURAND 

Prevents 

Xrte 

Van Sisters 



Dainty vocal and instrumental 
artists, featuring Christie Van, the 
greatest Irving girl cornetist. 



DIKE 



LEWIS 



THOMAS & CRADDOCK 



Singing, Talking and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



FRANK 



RITA 



McNELLIS and REYOS 

In 'The Waning Honeymoon" 
BY FRED J. BEAMAN— A COMEDY SKETCH CLASSIC 



RUSSELL'S DANCING MODELS 

In a Scenic Dancing Novelty 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

TIMIVI ONS and EDDY 

BACK IN TOWN 

Refined Singing, Violin and Piano 

in vaudkvills 



WILLIAM 



la tbssr Utsst 



EDNA 

LEEDOM 



EDMUNDS 

GOING TO THE WEDDING 



ALWAYS WORKING. I — j»f wart 



Dtrectiea MAX CORDON 



ORIGINAL 



COLONIAL IXRIO 



MAUD KELLY 
Harpist 



Pasturing 

MARTIN KEARY 

Tenor 
DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



KATHRIN HULLING 

Soprano 



BuhU pearl 

A <Sar&rit •pot on axqi Sill 
t uurtim Kara Clmtt Ibntim Mmrk Crug 



lVfabel Harper 

The Funbeam of Vaudeville ELSIE WEBER at the Piaao 



JOHNNY 

ics 

A BTMM from the South. 



CORA 

DIRECTION SAM SHANNON 



ROBERTS, STUART and ROBERTS 

FROLICS OF 1916-17 



aOMMP SOLID— LOEW CIRCUIT 



REP. SAM BAERWRZ 



JACK 



MATT 



CAMPBELL & MEEKER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EUGENE EMMETT & CO. 

In the Rural Musical Comedy, TOWN HALL FOLLIES" 

RAYMOND FRAZIER. Prtufejal CSBMesM 



EMILIE SISTERS 



DIRECTION 
LEW COLDER 



I: 



ETHEL MAE BARKER 

. „, .. .... "KUBELDC IN PETTICOATS*'" 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



EARL LINDSAY 

PRODUCER 

IN ASSOCIATION WITH 

PHYSIOC & STORY, Inc. 

SUITE 810 FITZGERALD BLDG-, 1482 BROADWAY 

Tele-phone Bryant 4835 

Is Prepared to Place and Cast Artists for Productions, Vaudeville, Revues and Pictures 

FRIENDS OLD AND NEW INVITED 




AGENTS GET HEP 

COIN BIG MONEY QUICK 

Sell the most complete line off 

Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 

Knives are all made of best steel. Handles with the latest REAL ART, SEPTEM- 
BER MORN, JESS WILLARD and other ATTRACTIVE DESIGNS. We want 
Agents in every city and town. We manufacture our own Knives, and, therefore, 
we are not dependent on foreign supplies. We ship promptly. We are the largest 
manufacturers and Distributors or Photo-Handled Knives for Sales Boards 
and Raffle Cards in the United States. Write us and we will see that you are 
promptly supplied. Ask for catalog and terms today. Do not delay. 

WE ASSIGN YOU TERRITORY AND PROTECT YOU IN IT 



A4\ 



f^skpi 






Our New Factory Building. Capacity, 1*9 



GOLDEN RULE CUTLERY CO. 

^ 212 No. Sheldon Street DepL 55 



Chicago, HI. 



B.F. Keith's Circuit ol Theatres 

A. PAUL KEITH. PtiiI.mL E. P. ALUS. VMM. A Gee. Iter. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Booking Manager of the UNITED 

OFFICES 

B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



NEW HOTEL WARNER 

(EUROPEAN) 

Cottage Grow* Arena* and 33rd Street, Chicago 

Telephone Drag las 873 

F. BURT CARR. Free-Heat and M — aec 

(formerly with Victoria, Wellington and Horrlson Hotel*) 

THEATRICAL PATRONAGE DESIRED 

260 Ontalde »~""-. 200 Private Baths, Booms with Private Bath, (LOO per day and upwards. Special 

-Weekly sad Pera-ansnt Rates. nRKPROOr. EZCKLLRNT OATS. POPULAR PRICBB. 

MILLER & KENT 

(LATS OF VAUDEVILLE) 
Basj to Announce that Thar Are fimalui IsRSj 

scHuuars exclusive sample style shop 



THEATRIC 
182 W. 44th STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



Marcus Loew's Enterprises 



General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Times Square, New York 



JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

CamirsJ Booking M»mser 



Mr. Sch onck Personally In ter , lew s Artists Daily Between 11 and 1 



Cklcms-o OSes: Nortk Asasrtcstt BoJUbf 
FRANK Q. DOYLE, fat char go 



Office: Treeaent Tliaatia Bulldins 
FRED MARDO, fa charge 



Acta faying; off in Southern territory* wire this office. 



ALLIANCE HOTEL 



Naw York City 



268 Wast 44th 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN FLAN. eS 3i lasi frvm Bruadaej. Professional 
Bad here bighdoa accommodation ■ and acrriee at reasonable prices. Tel Bryant 



e will 



SONG WRITERS ^^0^^JSi^i'^ 

PERFORMERS ROBT.'h. BREMEN 1433 Broadway, N. V. 



EDNA WINSTON TRIO 

NOW PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



DIRECTION CHARLES BORNHAUPT 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued from Pag* •> 



VALERIE BERGERE & CO. 

Theatre — Buahicick. 
Style — Dramatic Playlet. 
Time— Fifteen minute*. 
Setting — Fun stage, special. 

"Ambition" is an intense, dramatic, 
emotional playlet which permits Miss 
Bergere to display her emotional ver- 
satility to unusual advantage. The 
story, by Katherine Kavanangh, is 
based on circumstantial evidence and 
the "ambition" of a prosecuting at- 
torney to achieve tame regardless of 
the consequences to others. Frank B. 
Elliott portrays the role of the "State's 
Attorney," and Miss Bergere that of 
his wife. 

The plot, as it is unfolded, tells of 
the wife's nephew being accused of the 
murder of his employer, and the hus- 
band, as the prosecuting attorney, exer- 
cising every possible effort to secure a 
conviction in the case, regardless of 
family affiliations. In doing so he 
neglects bis wife for bis duties. 

On the eve of the trial the father 
of the boy comes to the home of the 
State's Attorney to appeal to him on 
behalf of the boy. Prior to the arrival 
home of the State's attorney, the father 
gets the sister-in-law to use her in- 
fluence with her husband. 

While they are waiting the butler 
brings two phials of medicine into the 
room. They examine the labels and 
ascertain that one of them contains a 
"deadly poison," while the other is a 
drug used by the States' attorney to 
quiet his nerves. 

Shortly afterward the husband ar- 
rives home and tells his wife that he 
is too immersed in his work to be able 
to give her any of his attention and 
time. She attempts to get him to in- 
tercede for the boy, arguing that it is 
all a matter of circumstantial evidence 
in the case and not sufficient to war- 
rant prosecution. He, however, is re- 
luctant to listen and persuades her to 
leave the room, as he has a witness 
coming to the house whom he desires 
to examine. 

The witness, a woman who conducts 
a gambling bouse and who is under 
obligations to the State's attorney, ar- 
rives. He tells her that she will have 
to testify that the young man had 
visited her establishment and lost con- 
siderable money, which would be a 
strong link of circumstantial evidence 
toward establishing a motive for the 
crime. The wife, in an ante room, 
hears this conversation and immediately 
enters the room as the woman departs. 

She again attempts to plead with 
her husband but he will not listen to 
her. She then tells him that her 
nerves are gone and he gives her some 
of his drug to quiet them. As soon as 
she takes it Miss Bergere does some 
of the most wonderful emotional work 
of her career. She gets bold of the 
"poison" bottle and shouts for all of 
the people in the house to enter the 
room because her husband had given 
her a "poison" to get rid, of her. As 
they enter, she tells them that he tried 
to kill her and falls in a faint ' " He 
immediately send* for the doctor bnt 
the brother-in-law tells him it is too 
late, as it is a case for the Coroner. 

The husband then tells the brother- 
in-law that he did not give her the 
poison; that he had only given her the 
nerve drug. The man turns a deaf ear 
and the husband pleads and cries for 
protection. At the end of this scene, 
tile wife recovers her senses and then 
unfolds to him the plot she had hatched 
to thwart his endeavors to convict her 
nephew of the murder upon circum- 
stantial evidence, using the incident 
that had just happened as a parallel. 
He then 'admits to her that she was 
right and no longer would he attempt 
to convict under these circumstances. 

The sketch is rounded into perfect 
shape and is well handled by Miss 
Bergere and her entire company. 




Card for SO jtan far Sun of U» Prof Ice 
EXOSA at ' 



'or Cm _ 
ISA 1SB3J 



1-3 K. 131a BL . Hew Tort 



BOB'S MOTOR EXPRESS 

NEW YORK HARLEM BROOKLYN 

Storage tor Tracks Reference. All HradUsera 

US West 4«th St, New York 
(Bet. B'way and 8th Ave.) Phone Bryant 4888 



THEATRES AND PRODUCTIONS, 

VAUDEVILLE ACTS EQUIPPED 

New and Second Hand Scenery in Stock 



MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO 



Columbia Theatre Bids., 
Tel. Bryant 1243 



47th * Broadway 
Tom Creamer, Mg 




PLaAYS 



Large List of 
New Frof ra- 
tional and 

Amateur Flays, Vaudeville Sketch- 
es, Stage Monologues, New Min- 
strel Material. Jokes, Hand-Books 
Oiiiorm, Folk Daaeaa, Hoaieal 
-.Pieces, Special. Entertainments, 
B «< ll .lfcw av. Dialogue*. Sp eake rs . 
Tableaux, Drffla, Wlga, BurdtCiMii Painta and 
Other Make -op Good*. CATALOGUE FRLE. 
T. S. OENISON ft CO- DEFT. 17. CHICAGO 



Telephone* —4— Bryant. 

Liberty Construction Co. 

F. OBOUBKE A MP P. LaMWOW. 

New sad B acona Band BOKNRRX. PBOPmsTlBB. 

AND LUMBER, STAGS RLBOTBIO 

APWANcas. 

Liberty Theatre, **l West 47th St, New York 

■vervthlar osed br "Blrtn at a Nation" sad 

-intolerant." tomHh.il br ea. 



CROSS & BANTA 



Printing 

AT RIGHT PRICES 
601 S. Dearborn CHICAGO 



DOC AND CAT DEPARTMENT 

NEW YORK 

Veterinary Hospital 

120 West 25th St., New York 

Telephone 9809 Farrag-nt 

Established 30 Years Booklet on Request 



Wanted for Next Season 

Chorus Ladles for 
THE BEEF TRUST 

Also Small Girls for the 
UNITED STATES BEAUTIES 

Also want good feature acta, and people lu ell 
tinea of Bnrleaque. Address BTXXT WATSON, 
Orphean Theatre, Paterua. N. J. 



MAGIC! 



ACTS FOS SAT.r CHEAP. We 
Buy. Sell or Exchange need 
Apparatus. Professional Cata- 
log tOe. Pocket Trick Included FBEE. Write or 
Call. Barnmaa Kagio Co., su. 1, «70SthAv.,lt.T. 

W. He HARRIS, transit:* 
Si West Mth Street, New York 
Storahoaae— S1S-S17 W. 31th Street 
Phone Greeley 1474 Trunks Cared For 



Central Fibre Wardrobe 

$35.00 

Etnltttfte 
trage $69.00 

mwm 

CENTRAL TRUNK 
FACTORY 

SIMONS A CO. 

7SS Arch St, 

Phfla. 




[ 



HEADLINE ACTS 



J 



RUTH and BOB 



The Musical Act With a Punch 

JACK FLYNN. REPRESENTATIVE 



XAS. & 



STANFORD 



ROBINSON and McKISSICK 



DIRECTION MAX OBENDORF 



APPOINTED BY UNiCLE SAM 



TOM 



JACK 



CONROY O'DONNELL 

PARCEL POSTMAN 
Deitrerlne Bundle, ol Joy and Pachs««s of Laoebter tor the U. B. O. 

Direction of TREAT MATHEWS Idea sad Material Coorrifutnd 



HARRY 



DOROTHY 



FABER m TAYLOR 



In "GOING NORTH' 



U. B. O. 



W. V. M. A 



JACK M. SYDNEY 

Versatile Entertainer Singing and Comedy 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ROBERTS 



CLINTON 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 

Singing, Dancing and Talking 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



NARY L.MAXFIELD 

Little Miss Personality 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



LINTON and WATSON 

Comedj Talking Act, Entitled 

««SIie Auto Know*' 

FRANKIE FAY 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

JOSEPHINE LENHART 

The Diminutive Songster m vaudeville 

.— M0RIARITY SISTERS -» 

DRESDEN POLLS OF VAUDEVILLE Direction IRVTNG SHANNON 

MARINO ™E RICH 

ITALIAN PIANO MOVERS IN VAUDEVILLE 

THE HENNINGS 

Refined Comedy Novelty Offering 

DIRECTION J. P. HARRIS 

BILLY GLASON 



Novelty "JUST SONGS" Character 



N. V. A. 



DIRECTION A. J. HOR WITZ 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



VAUDEVILLE HEADLINE ACTS 



CHAS. BIEHLER TOM DONNELLY 

BURLINGTON FOUR 



In "Hokemvillc" 

PERSONAL DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 



BILL NICHOLSON 



BILL HORN 



LA BELLE CARMEN TRIO 

The Best Novelty of the Season 
IN VAUDEVILLE 



Anna Marie 



Dainty Comedienne 



In Vaudeville 



BILLY 



BETTY 



KIMBALL and KENNETH 

Novelty Banjo Act Now at the Fulton 

Playing Loew Time D ir e c t i on Mark Lory 



Ann Dare 

In Vaudeville 

DIRECTION CHAS. FTTZPATRICK 



HUGE AS THE ALPS IN CLASS 

THE JIMMIE SHEA TRIO 

Jimmie Shalt, Earle Rickard Harry Donnelly 

Di r ect i on, Lee P. MuckenfuM 



Vivian 



Lee 



Bert 



Lawrence, Daly and Lawrence 

COMEDY— SINGING AND DANCING ACT 

IN VAUDEVILLE ADDRESS— CLIPPER 



ANNA MAE COONEY 

AND 

DELLA COONEY 



ALWAYS WORKING 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



C. H. HASKELL, Mgr— IDA BUTLER— SAM GILLETT1 HARMONY SINGING 

c. !>■ rt w ■•»»■«•# w ▼ ^u 



Eccentricities In Songs and Dances 



ED 

AND 

IRENE 



LOWRY 



IN 



<« 



Jests & Jigs 

BY TOMMY CRAY 



It 



AGENTS, LOOK US OVER 

and 

Cnns *■»# Unm SINGING. DANCING. MUSIC 

h»«~"«i» «*■ r»*»*mm and comedy, in vaudeville 

PAUL, LE VAN & DOBBS 

ACROBATIC COMEDIANS IN VAUDEVILLE 



J 



Ray Lynch 



FOR YOUR OWN INTEREST 



Arthur Clay 



FOUR AMERICAN BEAUTIES 



Fred Slater 



A BIG SURPRISE 
Direction of Winona Tenney 



Lew Price 



Beatrice McKenzie 

in a Singing Novelty Assisted by R AYE DUNN 
Direction FRANK EVANS 




VERCE & VERCI 



20th Century Elopement 



Dlractlea ROSS * CURTIS 



IRVING AND WARD 



The Button Busters 

DIRECTION BERNARD BURKE 



ADELAIDE CONLEY 

REFINED SINGING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDDIE 



DOLLY 



DOLLY & LEWIN 



IN A 

School, Fool and a Flirt 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



ELEANOR FISHER 



IN VAUDEVILLE 




BILLY NEWELL I ELSA MOST 



With MENLO MOORE 



W. V. M. a. 



U. B. O. 



SAM LAURA 

DAVIS & WALKER 

A Lesson In Dancing — Norman Jefferies 



THE 



MARTIANS 



In "THE ASTRONOMER'S 
DREAM OF MARS.** 

Special Scenery. Everything Original. 



ALL GIRLS 



Darling Saxophone Four 



DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



ORIGINAL 

THREE MELVIN BROS. 

America'. Moat SeneatioBal Cj ■■!■ . Claaaiaat Act of ha 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



DEATHS 



PRANK D. HUNTER, for twenty years 
manager of the White Theatre, McKees- 

port. Pa., died in that city last Thursday 
night from pneumonia. He was well known 
among the road show people. He was fifty 
years of age and is survived by his wife 
and one son. 

KATE J08EPHINE BATEMAN, the old 
time actress, died last week In London, 
Bngr. She was the daughter of B. I.. Bate- 
man, In his day a well known manager, and 
It was under his direction that she made 
her first success. She was born in Balti- 
more, Md., and besides touring the United 
States at the head of her own company, 
had played In the support of most of the 
noted American actors of her day. Her 
husband's name was Crowe and with him 
she went to England many years ago. 

JAMES WELCH, the English actor and 
producer, died last week In London at the 
age of fifty-one. Be had been on the 
British stage since 1887, flrst appearing 
with Wilson Barrett in "The Golden Lad- 
der." He created Important roles in many 
notable productions, Including Ibsen and 
Shaw plays. Some of the plays in which 

he was particularly successful are: "Rose- 
mary," "The Brixton Burglar." "The Snow 
Man," "Pacing the Music," "When Knights 
Were Bold," and "Mr. Bopklnson." At 
one time he leased Terry's Theatre, London, 
where he was actor and producer. 

SAM CHIP, appearing In vaudeville with 
Mary Marble, died last Wednesday night 
In Rochester, N. v.. where he was filling an 
engagement with his partner at the Temple 
Theatre in "John Qolden's Hockshop." 
Death resulted from heart failure, following 
an attack of acute Indigestion. His real 
name was Samuel Kornblum. He had been 
on the stage for nearly twenty-five of his 
forty years. 

W. L. 8MITH, who led the "Smith's 
Swiss Bell Ringers" In their tour of the 
"United States for twenty-nine years, died 
April 10 at his home In Decatur. Mr. Smith 
entered the amusement business in 1864, 
traveling; with the "Ladles' Silver Band," 
which later became known throughout 
America as "Smith's Swiss Bell Ringers." 
The company terminated its trips In 1832 
and disbanded, and Mr. Smith, returning to 
Decatur, lived a retired life. > 

GEORGE M. DEVERE, an old time black- 
face comedian, died suddenly last Wednes- 
day while trying to put out a grass fire on 
the lawn of his home. 1838 Eightieth street. 
Brooklyn. He was 66 years old and had 
not been active for several years. Mr. 
Devere won fame with Haverly's mlnstrelB, 
traveling all over the United States and 
Europe. He also played in Richard M 
Hooley's old Court Street Theatre. Later 
he appeared in the successful plays "The 
Clansman." "The Traveling Salesman." 
•Old Kentucky" and others. He was man- 
ager of the Paterson Theatre at the time of 
the fire there. 



LEPS TO DIRECT MASQUE 

I'iiii adelphia, April 14.— Wnssiil I^ps 
has signed a contract to direct the music 
for the performances of the Masque of 
American Drama, the outdoor pageant to 
be presented in the Botanical Gardens 
during the second week in May. Reginald 
De Koven is writing the music for the 
pageant. 



EMERY LEAVES "FUGITIVE" CAST 

Edward Emery will leave the cast of 
"The Fugitive" Saturday. 



WANTED 

Member* of the lliealih am. profession are 
offered an exception*! opportunity to add 



largely to their income by selling a work 
indispensable Is every actor. For terms 
and agency address Dept. S., FUNK * 
WAGNALU COMPANY, 3S4-3M Fourth 
Avenue, New York. 



Telephone 5834-5833 Bryant 

FEDERAL BONDING COMPANY 

30 East 42d Street, New York 
Suit* 1702 
Corporations Organized in New York, «t. In- 
cluding Complete Outfit— Seal. Stock 
Certificate!. Etc. Accounts 
Solicited, 

EXCELLENT FOOD GOOD SERVICE 

Telephone Bryant 4269 

Cfx St. Regie Restaurant 

AND BAKERY 

165 W. 47th Street 

Opposite Palace. 47th St. Side 

Bet. 6th Ave. & Broadway NEW YORK 

HERE'S WHERE HEADL1NERS MEET 

Telephone 1631 Melrose. 

It P. Knight Scenic Studios 

140th St. nnd Walton Ave., New York 

Three blocks south of Mott Avenue Subway 

Station. 

SCENERY OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

Always on Hand. 

Scenery Rented for Try Out Acts. 

For Rent from May 1 to Oct. 1 

ST. NICHOLAS RINK 

with auditorium 100 x 200 and balcony. Can be 
arranged to scat 4,000. Suitable for conven- 
tions, concerts, drills, exhibitions, etc 

For particulars address RINK, 69 West 66th, 
or 'phone 3700— Columbus. 

YOUR SUMMER RETREAT 

BEAUTIFUL Restricted Bungalow Building 
sites by tie sea; charming, convenient location; prtTtts 
halhlng besrh: fruit bets, forest, basting, ashing; low 
prices; euy terms; UUit cuaranlevd; particulars mailed. 
usEAT KILLS BEACH CORPORATION. 21 Park Roe. N. T. 
Con. 4209. 



fi.ODO IU12 Heralds, 4 pp., each pap 0j9 111.50 

10,000 9112 Heralds, 4 pp., each pais 6x9 19.00 

S.000 10Hil« Heralds. 4 pp.. each sacs 7il0W 12.50 

10.000 10Uxl4 fleraldv 4 pp.. escb nag* TxlOtt 20.00 

5.000 12118 Heralds, 4 pp., each pair 9x12 15.00 

10,000 12H8 neralds. 4 pp., each pass 9x12 25.00 

5.000 14x21 Heralds. 4 pp., each pass 10UH4 17.50 

10.000 14x21 Heralds. 4 pp.. escb pan 10%xl4 30.00 

S.000 6X24 Heralds, two sides 12.00 

10 000 0x24 Heralds, two sides 19.50 

5.000 7s21 Heralds, tee sides 12.50 

10.000 7x21 Heralds, Uo sides 20.00 

S. 000 9x24 Heralds, two sides 15.00 

10.000 9x24 Heralds, two sides 25.00 

» 000 leWafi Herald*, two tides 17.50 

10 000 10Vix2« neralds. two sides 30.00 

PrlnUd to order from type and cuts, black ink oo 
assorted poster paper. Owing to market conditions above 
prices for Immediate scceptance, sod snbfect to change 
without notice. Send for pries list Roots Book, 10c. 
GAZETTE SHOW PRISIIHG CO., Battsea, III., U. 5- A. 



Telephone* 

Bryant IKsVeStl 



THE ADELAIDE" 



HALF BLOCK FROM 
THE WHITE RATS 



754-756 Eighth Ave., Bert. 46th and 47th Sts., On* Block Went of PiMwl nny 

Room Apartments, Complete!? Furnished tor Housekeeping, Steam Heat. Beth. Pbooe 
Strictly Professional MRS. GEO. H1EGEU Manager 



SONGWRITERS 



_ ^._ -.. ... ..... -mi" ■ n cum, ii iiiii mi nil iuui __l~ZZ 

ZyfSSP Z SS ■J.jWaht -*. 8TAJCT RIGUT. Bmd b. mmm6t roar ««•* u^mr fw* lntKC . ^ ~ 

KNICiaERBOCKER STUDIOS.127 Gaiety Theatre Building, N. Y. Gty 



EARY & EARY 



WHIRLWIND NOVELTY GYMNASTS 



NEW TO THE EAST 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

Wants The Best In Vaudeville 

SnlfMS, Ordw.y Bids.. 207 Market St-, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY. PHONE <3 MARKET 



If you art* .» profession... fj.et a profofcitorsrtl copy lif ,li.» f ■ >■ .< U 1 1 ! 1 .. I love I) .1 1 1 .1 ti : 

You Carved Your Name Into My Heart 5 



CIij»j»«i 

LETTER B©Jf 



. to avoid mis tehee and to Insure tan nsaanfij ilelleoaw of tttn letters aili srtiasJ 

tkis last, n POSTAL CARD must be sent rsnneBtxu us to forward your letter. It must 

1 signed with year lull nam* and tbn ad dr ess to which the letter la to be sent, and the 

se of linsinees followed by the sender should be onsen tanned. 

Plans* mention the date (or number) el the CLIPPER In which the letters sent fnr 



GEKTLEMEN 



Adams, Teddy t 

Edna 
Andlno, J. E. 
Asber. Mar 
Barry, Nelson k 

Barry 
Bentum. Bsny 
Brown A MeCor- 

msck 
Bushes, Harold 
Bennett, Al 

Bawstt. Brail 

Bntcble. Sam 

BctOy, Uarrr 
Bresult. J. A. 
Crelgbtoo, Cbas. 
Clsrk. Bert 
Columbia Stock 

Co. 
Crowded, Barry 



Allrn, Nellie 
Addison. Velms 
Carrol 1, Jenetle 
Bropny, Alice 

Beeeher. Ruth 
Boise, Millie 
Bennett, Victoria 
Cblidcrs, Grace 
Coyle. Gladys 
Crelehton Bisters 

Corcoran, Blsncbc 



Csllsoto, Walter 
De Noyer a Oanle 
Dlxey. Henry 
Duffey. Jsck 
Ouffln-Bcdesy 

Troope 
Davis, Tom 
Dale. Josh 
Elliott. Max C 
Elsfeldt, Mr. A 

Mrs. K. 

Emmett, Eusrne 

Fields ft Bemt 

Foley A La Tore 
Forbes. Gas 
Fisher A Boekway 
Gallagher. E. B. 
GrifflU, Jack 
Goets, Anstlo 
Cahagan. Wm. 



Cbaolsae, Miss a 
Des Val. Olympla 
Dans. Kstherine 
Drew, Margant 
Danks. Mln G. 

c 

Hamplrr, Base 
De sbow, Ruth 
Detty, Maw) 
Dare. Miss Blllle 
Famum, Tberesa 



Gosbcn, C. B. 
Gran. Billy 
Graham, Frank 
Grant, John 0. 
Green, J. Victor 
Hal, Bllsworth A 

Merrick 
Hanley. Nick 
'Htrney. Ben 

Howard A Boyle 
neelow. Chat. 
HUlman. F. P. 
Iluiillej, J. II. 

Hamilton. Jaa. 

Howard. dene 

Indiana Amuse. 
Co. 

Klein Bros. 
King. Tbos. 
Kelly. Phil 



Kobler. Waldo r. 
Kelly. Arthur J. 
Lawrence, Daly 4 

Lawrence 
Uroy, if. 
Ughtroor, TBOS. 
Lace. It H. 
Lester. H. A. 
Latour. Geo. A. 

Link. Harry 1. 
Listen, Jss. 
Lanham. Karl 
Link, Bsny r. 

Lambert. Frank 

II. 
Levy. Alpbl 

Unroot. Hsny 
Lee. John n. 
Murray. Peter 
Mills. B. H. 



LADIES 



Grimes. Fosta 
Harlow, Beatrice 
Jones, Boss (4c. 

doe) 
Jsrobs. Ions 
Lewis. Grace 
La Salle. Babe 
Lawless. Joe. 

Mrs. 
Learilt. Jrsnetts 

Monroe. Brulah 



Miller. Tbos. A.. 

Mrs. 
Hasten, Mae 
Morrill. Maria 
Mrrall. Adelslde 
0-Nelll. Feggy 
Pearl. Bubls 
Paul. Mrs. 0. M. 
Perkon. Mrs. Ar- 
thur 

SoWiucn. Minnie 
' 



McEnroe, Job. 
Mullen. Jos. 
Morse. Frank w. 
Mason. J. W. 
McCadden. Joe T. 

Nrweomb. 0111a 

Od.Il, Tommy 
George, Al 
rcrklns, Bert B. 
Park. Sam 
Penney, a. A 
Plixl. Bashsrl 
Bomsln A Pearl 
Ueades. The 

Rnhhloi. Clint A. 

Bi-ld. Hal 

Hinsdale. Frank 
Rwan. Cliff 
Slsnley k Gold 
Sister A Finch 



Bempel, Bessie A 

Harriet 
Bae. Ida w 
Russell, Nells 
Rohrrts, Edna 
Stooer, Jessie 
Bswyrr. Mrs. J. 

St. Pierre. Hn. 
Louis 

Behsde. Betty 



Sutton. Kclntjm 

A Sutton 
Sports in the Alps 
Sins! 

Sharp, Bert 
St- Pierre. Loan 
Soon. Ota 
Simmons, Geo. H. 
Van Ostcu A 

Parks 
Wilton. Jdt 
Wills A Southern 
Wslck, Esra C 
Williams, Brett 

Weston. Ted 
Welsh. Lew J. 
Wtlser, Wm. 
WaldrOD. J. L. 
Wright, ntho 



Soarn, Mercedes 
Sheldon. Rosalie 
Bin. Jenls 
Telfer. Madeline 
Taylor, Htrgartt 

IPs*,) 
Weston. Baldis 
Wayne. Kathryn 

M. 



GEO. kVt. 

COHAN'S 



B' WAT As 4M ST. Eve. 8.28. 
lists. Wed. A Bat. 2.25. 

KLftW A BRLANOnR Ksiiassrs 

HBNBT VlUal praanntw 

RUTH CHATTERT0M 

• nrl Company, including Brnce McRao. in 

"COME OUT OflFTHE gOTCHEN" 

rfWTM ACTA Mats. Tbors. and 8st. 2..10. 

DLLraStU west 44th St. Eves. 8.30. 

DAVID BF.LASCO Presents 

ARNOLD DALY 

in a New PUy by JOHN MEEHAN. 

"Ttte Very lVllM.i>te** 

■ IDCDTV W. 42d St. Eves. 8.18. Mats. 
«-*n*gCaIV 1 X Wed. and Sslurdsy 2.15. 
John Mason. Irene Fenwlcs, Helen Wars, etathllde 
Cottrelly. Helen LowsU. Hiobard Bennett, Lew 
Fields, Willis P. Swestnam. la 

"BOSOM FRIENDS" 

By FXAJfg sanJfllEL. 

1 vr-rrn u 4sth at. a B'wty. Eves. 8.20 
Lib tUtn Mats. Tbort. 4k Sat. 2.20. 
SEASON'S BIG DRAMATIC TRIUMPH! 
HERALD— 

"Undeniable Bucosss. 



THE CASE OF 
LADY CAMBER 



WORLD— 

•'Popular Bnooss n ." 

HON— 

"A Thriller." 



NEW M0R0SC0 THEATRE 

Attn ST.. lent W. of B-way. Phone Bryant ewtV 

■Tea. 8.15. Mat*. Wed. audi hat. ill 
Oliver eloroscos Ores* MeStoal Faroe with Olrta. 

CANARY COTTAGE 

WITH THIXrE TBIOaUsZA, 
rfharlee Bnwtlsn sad Herbert Oerthell. 

■> I TlMaCaT THEATRE W. 42d St. Bvs. at 8.3U 
LLlllltjE, Mats W«1. * Sat. 

SELWTH at CO. PRESENT 

JANE COWL 

in "LILAC TIME" 



GAIETY 



THEATRE, ll'wsy A 48th 
St. Eves, at 8.20. Hats 
Wen. A Bet. at 2.20. 

WINOHZIX SHITH sad JOHN L. GOLDEN 
Present the season's aureus 

TURNTOTHERIGHT 



HIPPODROME 

MANAGEMENT OHARLBB DI1J.INOI7AU 
NlghU at 8. IB. Hat. every day. 2. IS. 

••THE BIO SHOW" 

STAOBD BY B. H. BCRN8IDE 

ftffiEES, KELLERMAN 

NEW ICE MAMMOTH I 100 NOVELTIES 

BALLET MINSTRELS I 1000 PEOPLE 



KNICKTOCHER 

Daw A tstaaVafsjr 

GEORGE ARLISS 



Thaatra, B'way ft 88th 
St. ■van. st t.SO. Mats. 
Wed. A Sat. 2.20. 

Managers 



WW 



In his srrestest a u co.es 



99 



Cohan & Harris 



THEATRE 
Want 414 ■«_ 
CaU Bryant 8844. 
Eves. 8.20. Mats. Wed. * Bat at 2.20 
OOHAJf sun, KnHBM .rsaasii 

"THE WILLOW TREE" 

A rAMTABT 01' rATASI. 

By Banrimo sad Hairiaoa Rhedas. 



EMPIRE S -•»• «) St. Eva 8.80 
VlA^JLt^ *»•'■• Wsd. 4k sat. MM 

CHARiZB FROHXAV PBE8EHT8 

MAUDE ADAMS 

A KISS FOR CINDERELLA 

J. M. BARBIE'S GREATEST TRIUMPH. 



B. F. KEITH'S OERTRUDE HOxTKASTf. 

ww n w . — _, BERT CLARK A ansa 
PALACE :HJUm -T0N, GEO. WHITE 

<.g,r>vsu k LUCnxz OAVANAOH, 

Broadway A 47th St. DAISY JEAN, Austin 
Webb aV Co., Bankoff ft 
OlrUe, Dyer ft Esy. The 
Nelsons, Mrs. Castle la 
"Patria." 



Mat. Dally at 2 P. M 

25. SO sod T5e. 

Every Night 

23-60-73-81-8 1.00. 



CORT 

laughiDf success. 



I'ubiiah.ai b> KAROLO KO.-..S1 I KK Mtsli 1.0 . 217 .'if .'?1 VV M ,c 



REPUBLIC 



THEATRE. W. 42nd St. 
Evenings at If. 13. Matinee* 
Wednesday A Saturday 2.13. 
Messrs. Sbobert present 
a dramatisation of George . du Manrier's novel 

TETER IBBETS0N 

with Joba Barrymore, Constance Collier, mors 
Hope Crews, Lionel Barrymore. 



West 48th St.. l'hone Bryant 4V. 
Eva. at 8.20. Hats. Wed. ft Sat. 
2.20. Oliver Horonco's great 
Season's One Substantial success 

UPSTAIRS * DOWN 

BY FREDERIC ft FANNY HATTON 



FULTON 



THE1ATKE. WEST 4Stn ST. 

Eves, at 8.80. Mats. Wad. ft 
Bat. 2.80. 
7. TRE D sisassvsw rrsswnta 

WTT.I.IAM TH08. A. 

COURTENAY WISE 

erfc PALS FIRST %z*m 



HUDSON 



w. 41th ex. Cvsa, 
Mats. Wed. ft Sat. 
Estate of Henry B. Hssris, ssnaesrer. 
JOHH D. WILLIAMS Presents 



l.li. 



The Haw Three-Act Comedy 

"OUR BETTERS" 



By H. 80 



HATJ0HAH 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



VAUDEVILLE HEADLINE ACTS 



1 



BETTY FIELDS 



Booked Solid 



mm Wm LOU EDLEMAN 



Jane Ware & Co, 

in "A TEXAS TANGO," By Frank L. Whittier 

Direction EVELYN BLANCHARD 



THE THREE ROZELLAS 

A Classy Musical Oddity 
Of VAUDEVILLE Direction ARTHUR HORWRZ 



- A BREEZE FROM THE PLAINS 

NEBRASKA BILL & CO. 



WESTERN NOVELTY ACT 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



JOHN 



JOHNNY 



MARTIN and ELLIOTT 

"THOSE FASHION PLATE DANCING BOYS" 

Direction MARK LEVY 



DAINTY QUEEN OF SENSATIONAL RHYTHMIC GRACE 

LA PETITE MERCEDES 



A GORGEOUS DISPLAY OP NOVEL RICHNESS 

Dilution ARTHUR J. HORWITZ 



Thomas & Henderson 

The Black Steppers 

WATCH THEM IN VAUDEVILLE 



The Boy Who Cam* Back 

In a N«w Act by Allan Spencer T. 
ASK MY AGENT 



FANNIE 



BlLLlt 



'■ ■ 



"TAKING CHANCES." 



Direction MARK LEVY 



SKATING VENUSES 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction HARRY WEBER 



IL. 

Upside Down Comedians 



DIRECTION WENONAH M. TENNEY 



THE THREE ARLEYS 



BARNUM Ml BAILEY CIRCUS 



D%— M— PAUL DURAND 



O'BRIEN & KING 

(Formerly (VBriai A Enmr) 

In THE NEW PIANO PLAYER 



THREE SYNCOPATORS 



SMITH 



LANG 

Direction GLADYS BROWN 



NOMOU 



FREDERICK H. SPEARE AND CO. 

Offer the No^el Co medy Sketch Hit, 
>ft>«BB 



«« 



NOW HEADLINING LOBW CIRCUIT 



99 



REPRESENTATIVE LOUIS WK5LXY 



BENTELL BROS. 



Acrobatic Dancers 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction MARK MONROE 



JAS. E. 



ED. P. 



WORLD & PEAT 

SINGING, DANCING AND COMEDY IN VAUDEVILLE 



JIM 



C. 



COVENEY & WOODROW 



The Precedents of Vaudeville 



PHYLLIS 



EUGENE 



CURWOOD and GORMAN 

Before the Honeymoon and After 

B r HERMAN KAHN 

Copyrighted 



KATHRYN MILEY 

"Nature's Own Comedienne" 

In Vaudeville 



Three lMorrle Sisters 

Singing, Dancing, Novelty! 

New Act L» Vaudeville 



EDWARDS and LOUISE 

IN "A VAUDEVILLE SURPRISE" 
booked solid u. B. O. DIRECTION JACK MACANN 



Dan Dix & Virgil 

WITH STAMPEDE RIDERS 



RUTH 

a 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



JOE 



AND 



Direction HARRY PINCUS 



ED E. and BIRDIE CONRAD 

In a Vaudeville CU»»ique by ED E. CONRAD 

Dfceetha Lewis * Gereea 



bob-KELLEY & C AXLI1M-€eo. 

THOSE NATURAL COMEDIANS . 
ItePUacmtaaOrlfiuten OaOdr IMRwSffBH «I WerWCarrjtai tettr SecdriSccBcrjraeal 



\ 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



TfflUDEVILLB 

For N&xt W&&M. 




U. B. O. 

Palao* — Phyllla Nollsen Terry- — Leo Been. 
<8»ren to OIL) 

HEW YOU CITY. 

Royal — Arnold A Tailor— Olalre Vincent Co. — 
Norman Bros. — Mabel BtuaeB— Eddie Leonard. 

OsloalAl— Nina Payne * Co.— Tennessee Ten— 
Andrew Hack — Gland* * fansls TJeher — TJlllan 
Bhaw. 

Alhainbra — Klrby * Bow* — Ameta — Three Bobs 
— Lambert * BaU— Dooley * Bale* — Jo* Bernard 
A Co.— Hughes Musical Trio — Lewis * father. 

Blverslde— Merck's Llooa— Bock * White— 
Wills Holt Wakefield — Gerard A Clark— Dancing 
Girl Delhi— FIto Nelson*. 

Boahwtok— Sam Mann A- Co.— Hcarnlof * Var- 
vara— Diamond A Granddaughter— Allen ft Howard 
—Harry Carroll— Wllla Bolt Wakeaeld— Nat. N. 
Wills— BIc* ft Werner. 

Ornhscua — Bra B. Fontaine — Ward ft Van — 
Chinese Dno — Sylvester ft Vance — Be* Ho Gray Co. 

1TLAKTA. Oft. 
Forsyth — Soger Gray Co. — Alexander Kids — 
Harry ft Bra Puck— Winona Winter— "Olrl with 
tOOO Byes." 

BOSTON, EAB8. 
Eeith'a— Seven Brack*— Mae Irwin - Leigh ft 
Joaea — Valmont ft Baynan — "America First" — Cor- 
ner Store— Bae B. Ball— Yonng ft Yeldron— Fay, 
Two Coleya ft Fay — BUlle Gould. 
BUFFALO. N. T. 
Shea's — Geo. H. Boaener— Maleta Boneonl — Duffy 
ft Lorena — Bay ft G. Dooley — Three Bennett Sla- 
ter* — Milton ft De Lone Slaters— Florence Moore ft 
Brother— 6 Water Iillea — Harry Holman ft Co. 
BAXTTKOHE, MB. 
Maryland — "Petticoats" — Carlisle ft Bomer— 
Cole. Buaaell ft .Davis — Nan Halperln — Raymond 
O'Connor— Lord ft Fuller— John W. Banaome— 
Scotch Lads ft Laealee. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
Keith'*— Oacar Lorraine — "Forest Fire" — "Those 
French Girls" — Marlon Weeks — Adelaide Boothby 
—Raymond ft Caverly — Bert Baker ft Co. — "Nur- 
sery Land." 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 
Keith's — Hull ft Durkin — Jack Barley — Watson 
Sisters— Weston ft Claire— "Rnneville"— Emily A. 
Wellman — "Act Beautiful" — ctairmoot Bros. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO, 
Keith's — Walter Brower — Maryland Sincere — 
Bmtlle Slaters — Travllla Bros, ft Seal— Toota Pais 
A Co.— Swor ft Avery — Macart & Bradford — Marie 

Stoddard. 

CHARLESTON. 8. O. 

Academy (First Half)— AL Sbayne. (Last Half) 
— Chas. Oicott— Bison City Four— Ruth Budd. 
DAYTON. OHIO. 
Keith'*— Will Oakland ft Co.— Garclnettl Bros.— 
Three Du For Boys — David Capersteln — Clifford ft 
Will*— Clark ft Verdi— Grace De Mar. 
DETROIT, MICH. 
Temple — Hale ft Peterson — Joale Heather — Bock- 
well ft Wood— Rath Broa. — Lohse ft sterling; — Mil- 
ton Pollock Co. — Vinton ft Boater — Skipper ft 
Kaatrop. 

ERIE. PA. 
Colonial — Lydcll A Hlgglns — Nelson Waring — 
"Bride Shop" — Roland Travere. 

OBAND RAPIDS, MIOH. 
Empress — Pletro — mule Reevee ft Co. — The 
Crisps— Edna Aug— Wm, Kba ft Co.— "Motor Boat- 

HAMIXIOH, CAM. 
Temple — Flavllla— American Comedy Four — Bob 
Albright — Mme. Beaaon Co. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Grand — Brltt Wood— Wilfred Clark ft Co. — Dong 
Fong Gue ft Haw — Sara Padden ft Co. — The De 

Maooa. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Keith's — Page, Hack ft Mack — Golet Harris ft 
Morey — Rencc Parker— CaL Boys' Band — DeForest 
ft Keerne— Helen Page ft Co. 

MONTREAL, CAM. 
Orphenm — Yvette — Franklyn Ardell Co. — "Five ot 
Clubs" — Leightner ft Alexander — Clark'a Ha wa liana 
— A1. Herman. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 

Princess (First Half)— Kenny ft Hallls— Bobln- 

son's Blephanta. (Last Half) — Leon Stater* ft Co. 

— ParlUo ft Frablto— Duffln Redcay Troupe — "Be- 

vue DeVogue" — Roger Gray ft Co. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Davii — Muriel Worth ft Co. — Boot. T. Haines 
■Co.— Chas. T. Aldrtch A Co. 

PHTT.dDFT.PHlA, PA. 

Keith's — Hooper ft Marbnry — Daley Jean — Head- 
liners— Sam ft Kittle Norton— SalUe Fisher Co. — 
-Cooper ft Rieardo — Jno. B. Hynicr Co. — Gnrcln ft 
Newell — Four Amaranths. 

ROCHESTER, H. T, 

Temple — Primrose Four — Brennan ft Powell — 
Kane Bros. — Dan Burke ft Glrla — Delro — Four Lu- 
kes*— Harry Green ft Co. — Meehan'e Dogs M cKay 
ft Ardlne. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 

Keith's -Wm. SUto— Asakl Troupe— Al. ft Fannie 
Steadman — Beatrice Morrell'e Sextette — Annate 
Aaorla Co. — Blcnerda, Bennett ft Martin — Great 
Howard — Mrs. Gem* Hashes — Bay Ssmnels. 
TOHOHTO, CAN. 

Shea's— J. ft B. Morgan— Olga Mlshka ft Co.— 
'Percy HaaweU Co. — Spencer ft WHUama — Selma 

atam 



■WARHINGTOS. O. a 

Keith'*— Bemple Slater*— The Brad* — Booaey ft 
Bent — Bradley A Ardlne— Gertrude Hoffman — Vai. 
ft B. Stanton— Savoy ft Brennan. 

YOUNQSTOWN, OHIO. 

Keith's— Bowman Bros. — Lanrl* ft Bronsos — 
Dainty Marie Meeker— "Night Boat"— Badle ft 
Ramaden— S. Miller Kent— 8td Lewi*— Nip ft Tuck. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHJOAQO, ILL. 

Majestic— Mclntyre ft Heath— Belle Baker— 
nicer ft Douglae — Dahl ft Glllen — Imhoff. Conn ft 
Coreene — Joe Towle — Chief Caupeoltcaa — Valleclta'e 
Leopards. 

Palace— Jack Norworth — Avon Comedy Four— 
Farber Girl* — Chaa. Ahearn Troupe— Harold Da- 
ken* Trio — Frlscoe — "Tate's Fishing" — Fern ft 
Davis — Frank Hartley. 

OAXOABT. CAM. 

Orphenm— Ruth St. Deal* ft Co.— Marlon Harrla 
—Helen Plngree ft Co. — Lewis A Norton — King A 
King— Blaaett ft Scott. 

DENVER, COLO. 

Orphean) — Bert Leslie ft Co. — Tempest ft Son 

shine— Moore. Gardiner ft Hose — "A Double Eipo- 
■dto" — Eatelle Wentwortn — Misses Campbell — Bmbe 

ft Alto*. 

DULUTH, MINN. 
Orphenm — Creasy ft Dayne— Nellie Nichols — 
Adair ft Adelphl — Lee Berth — Boss Bros. — Sarasroff 
ft Sonia— Konn'e Sisters. 

DE8 KOIKES, Ift. 
Orphans*— Adele Blood ft Co. — Rotter Bros. — 
Howard's Animals — Thoa. Swift A Co.— Guerro ft 
Carmen — Haruko Ohnkl. 

KANSAS CITY. KO. 
Orphenm — Dorothy Shoemaker ft Co.— Hallen ft 
Puller — Henry Keane ft Co. — Emerson A Baldwin — 
Hayes ft Blves — Meredith ft Snooxer — Byan ft Lee. 
LOB AN0ELO8, OAX. 
Orphenm — Unne'a Dancing Girl* — Kullervo Broa. 
— Ethel Hopkins— Cross A Josephine — F. ft A. A*, 
taire— Whiting ft Burt— "The Cure"— Helllgan ft 
Sykes — Clara Morton. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orphenm — Morgan Dancers — H. ft A. Seymour — 
Galtes Bros. — Waiter Weema — Everest's Monkeys — 
Rice, Rimer ft Tom — Flanagan a Edward*. 
KTKNEAP0U8, MINN. 
Orphenm — Nat Goodwin — Harry I* Mason — Three 
Janoa — Roy Harrah Troupe — Hayward ft Stafford — 
Blgga ft Wltcble — William ft Margaret Cutty. 
MILWAUKEE. WIS. 
Orpheum — Eva Tangnay — Avellng ft Lloyd — Ame* 
ft Wlnthrop — Hayward ft Stafford — Wallace Galvln 
— The Vivians. 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Orpheum — Blossom. Seeley ft Co. — "Age of Bea- 
aon"— Chaa. Grohs ft Co. — Mr. ft Mrs. Jlmmle 
Barry — Donohn* ft Stewart — Knapp ft Cornell — 
BurdeUa Patterson. 

HEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orpheum — Louis Mann ft Co. — Whitfield ft Ire- 
land — Eva Taylor ft Co. — Kerr ft Berko— Black ft 
White — Willing -ft Jordan— Australian Crelgbtona. 
OMAHA. NEB. 
Orpneum— Claude GlUlngwater ft Co. — Beatrice 
Herford — Benny ft Woods — Corbett. Sheppsrd A 
Donough — Wheeler ft Dolan— Mack ft Earl— Maria 
Lot 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Orphenm— French ft Eli— Seven Honey Boys- 
Una Clayton A Co.— Alice Lyndon Doll A Co. — 
La Gracioaa — Gould ft Lewis. 

PORTLAND. OBE. 
Orpheum — Hermlne Shone ft Co. — Ashley ft All- 
man— Etbel McDonough — Wright ft Dietrich — 011- 
vattl. Moffet ft CUre— Billy Klnkald— "Tate'a 
Motoring." 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Orpheum — Hyams ft Mclntyre — Jan. C. Morton ft 
Co. — "Old Time Darkles" — McCarty ft Faye— Clara 
Howard — Zeda ft Hoot. 

SAB FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Orphenm — Cecil Cunningham — Edwin Arden ft Co. 
— Togan ft Geneva— Chung Hwa Four — The Berrene 
— Martneln Slaters — Artie Mehllnger — MeWattera A 
Tyson. 

SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON AMD 0RE8C0. 
Orphenm — The Canslnoe — Chaa. Grapewln ft Co. — 
Qlrsehel Hendler — Medlln. Wattera ft Townee— 
Nonette — Palfrey, Hall ft Brown. 
ST. FAUX, MINN. 
Orpheum — Geo. Nash ft Co, — Foster, Ball ft Co. 
—Maurice Burahart — Herbert Clifton — Hans Hanks 
— Nordstrom ft Plnkhsm. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Orphenm — Belle Story — Johnston ft Harty — Bert 
Kenny — Barry Glrla— The Recital — Monroe Broa. 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Orpheum — Lew Dockatader — Natallealt — Newboff 
ft Phelps — Lydla Barry — Brent Hayes — The Nor. 
relies — Geo. Kelly ft Co. 

VANCOUVER. OAK. 
Orphenm— Le Boy Talma ft Bosco — Jane Ooor- 
thope ft Co.— Ben Deely ft Co. — Aerial De Ooffe— 
Long ft Ward — MlUlcent Mower — G. Aldo Ban- 

dagger. 

WINNIPEG, OAK. 
Orpheum— Ray Cox— Dorothy Bhsemaker ft Co. — 
Dorothy Brenner — Boyle A Brown — Leach Wallen 
Trio— Frank ft Toble — De Leon ft Dtvlea, 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

HEW TOBX 0TTT. 

American (First Half) — Two Brownies — Beth 
Mayo — Borslnl Troupe — Lou Holts — Whott Four — 
Grace ft Erato Forrest — Harry Fern ft Co. — Bell 
ft Freda. (Last Half)— Martin ft Howard— Mc- 
Dermott ft Wallace — Fern, Richelieu ft Fern — 
Walton ft Delbetg — Victor Morey ft Co. — DeLlsle 
ft Vernon — '"Ankles" — Three Vagrants. 




ALBOLENE 



In almost oniWioloM 
in Ihm .ir« SJing room. 
We Kaveminy testimonials from prominent 
artists. They all testify to its excellence 
ai a make-up remover and say "it cuts 
the paint instantly so that it can be 
removed i& a second " 

Albolen* ia put up in i and a ounce tube* 

CD fit the mxkeup box: also in Mj and 1 lb. 
cans. It may be had of most clrugguts and 
dealers in make-up. Sam/ft/rt* r* rvgw"<- 

McKESSQN &. ROBBINS 
Incorporated 
91 Fulton Street ." • New York 2 



LATEST 

and giuateat collection of vaude- 
ville comedy material in the world. 

THE NEW No. a 

McNALLY'S BULLETIN 

Everything New, Bright and Original 
PRICE si.oo 

MoNALLTB BULLETIN No. 2 contains 
IT hcheamino M0N0L0GUE8. For He- 
brew, Irish, Black and Wblte Face, Dutch, 
Tramp, Wop, Female and Stump Speech. 

10 GREAT ACTS FOB TWO KALES. Bach 

■ Ct a%Xa KpriLtsUaXS WlDSCr. 

ft ROARING ACTS FOR HALE AND FE- 
MALE. They'll make good on any bill. 

XS 8UH.E-TIB-E PARODIES. On all of 

Broadway's latest Song Hits. 

A COMEDY/ SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO GET RICH." It's the FUNNIEST 
SKETCH In Vaudeville. 

MoNALLY'B KEBRT MINBTBELB. Con- 
sisting of six corking FIRST PARTS, end 
lng with a screaming Finale. "NOT 
OUIL.TY." 

A TABLOID COMEDY AND BURLESQUE, 
entitled "IT'S YOUR WIFE"; also bun 
dreds of Crossfire Gaga and Jokea ' and 
additional Comedy Surprises. Remember 
the price of McNALLY'8 BULLETIN No. 
3 la only OBE DOLLAR per copy, with 
money-back guarantee. 

WM. McMALLT. 81 E. 125th St. New Tort 







FUNNYBONE No. 5 Sfti-f m.^ 

loinee. sketches, parodies, minstrel Drst-pirU. SO 
sidewalk gags and a tabloid farce for e people. 
FDNNYBONB No. 5 costs SSe.; or will aend any 
two Issues for 50 cent*, any S for TO cents, any 
4 for 11: or FUNNYBONE 1, 2. 3. 4 and B fee 
11.25. FUNNYBONE PUBLI8HINO 00., X*. 10M 
Third Avenue, Now York (Sept. C). 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St, 7 A. M. ta It P. M. 

and at Midnight with 51*1* If* 

is MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

Prom W. tU St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E. P. Agent 

um BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 



I"-** i » tec*. 

UN S inch. 



WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St., N. Y. 4 W. 22d St, N. T. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Orders Fined Same Day Kscstvsd 
» IlepMlt Rsqulmd 



AT LIBERTY — THE WHITWORTH SISTERS 

For the summer and nest season. 

VIOLET I RUTH 

Versatile Leads — Heavies, 7 yeara' Ingenues, Juveniles, some Boubrettes. Singing 

experience. I specialties. 3 yeara' experience. 

Two res ponsi ble girls for a responsible manager. Both One appearance and modern wardrobe. Address 
VIOLET WHITWOBTH, Riddletown, 0. (Butler County). 



WANTED FOR NEXT SEASON!!! 



NOVELTIES— SENSATIONAL FEATURES 

and Dancing Acts; Girl Musical Act; Tall Juvenile,, Moat Sins; and Dance; Good Looking Chorus Girls 

WORKING, WILL BE PLEASED TO LOOK YOU OVER. 



(Co n si s t in g of Girls P r eferred) l Comedian, with Box Office Value; Sinring 

IF YOU ARE 



"FOLL.IE5 OF THE DAY~-"SOME SHOW"— "AMERICANS- 
SUITE Ml-*ez, COLUMBIA THEATRE BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



Released! The Two Wonder Songs of 1917 

M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-P-P-I 

The Frances White, of Rock & White, Sensation, and the Big 

Raymond Hitchcock Hit in Betty 

SOMETIME 

Harry Tierney's Two Greatest Melodies. Orchestrations in All Keys 

COME OVER, COME OVER, COME ON OVER HERE 

IT'S A WONDERFUL PLACE 

WM. JEROME PUBLISHING CORPORATION 

Publishers of all GEORGE M. COHAN Future Musical Compositions 

Strand Theatre Bldg., Broadway and 47th St., New York Chicago Office, Grand Opera Home Bldg., Suite 55 



N. Y. CLIPPER 

"THE DREAM GARDEN" 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 
Style — Musical instruments. 
Tins* — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

In a so-called "dream garden" six pretty- 
girls, dressed in old-fashioned hoop skirts 
and quaint bead-gear, entertain upon 
various brass musical instruments and 
violins. Their selections number about 
six in all, and are well played. 

The scene in back lights up and give 
a pretty effect. 

In the final number the girls' hats also 
light up. This is quite novel. 

The act is an excellent one of its style 
and should find it easy work succeed- 
ing. Some of the numbers — the bass horn 
solo, for instance— are a trifle long and 
would be more acceptable if made shorter. 

H. G. 



WILLIAM GRADY 



PRESENTS 




THE LAST WORD IN SCENIC MUSICAL OFFERINGS 

5TH AVE. NOW— ALL GIRLS, BIG FLASH 



VARIETY 

"The Dream Garden" (8). 

Musical. 

14 Mint. ; Full (Special). 

6«th Street. 

'Six girls who play strings and brasses In 
an act very pretty to -the eye as to setting 
and dressing, but lacking slightly In "pep" 
as far as the present musical program Is 
concerned. What they need Is a single livaly 
number In the center, their present second 
selection being too long and rather depressing 
in its effect. A llttlo "Jsaa" at the Union 
would send the turn along to much better 
advantage. They open with all six playing 
the brasses, the second number being a string 
and brass arrangement with three violins 
and the brasses runted. Later one of the 
glrla plays a bass horn, and another offers 
a soprano solo, the sextet going to the 
brasses again for the finish. The girl with 
the trombone seems finished enough a mu- 
sician to Inject the necessary "}axs" ginger 
which would prove a closing wallop for 
them. When speeded up the turn should 
prove big time class. FRED. 



THE SONG SENSATION FROM NEW ORLEANS 



DON'T LEAVE ME, DADDY 



WE HAVE NOW ESTABLISHED OUR NEW YORK PROFESSIONAL, OFFICE 



TRIANGLE 



321; 



MUSIC PUB. CO. 



Bldg., B' way and 47th St. 
SAM. L. ROSENBAUM, Gen. Mgr. 



ABSLAM SHARIFF 

THE LATEST MUSICAL REVIEWS 

20 — PEOPLE — 20 

Send in open time per route. Direction MARK MONROE. Putnam Bldg., N. Y. 



MAX HART PRESENTS 

THE 



Val 

In "OH, BRAZIL" 



Ernie 



NEXT WEEK 

KEITH'S WASHINGTON 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



BURLESQUE 

Columbia Circuit 

Burlesque Bevue — Gaiety, Toronto, 16-21 ; 

Gaiety, Buffalo, 23-28. 
Bowery Bnrlesqaers — Gaiety, Detroit, 16-21 ; 

Gaiety, Toronto, 23-28. 
Bostonlana — People's Philadelphia, 16-21 ; 

Palace, Baltimore, 23-28. 
Bon Tons — Jacques, Watetbnry, ie-2l ; 

Cohen's, Newburgh, N, Y., 23-25; Cohen's, 

Poughfceepsle, 26-28. 
Bellman Show — Casino, - Boston. 16-21 ; Co- 
lombia, New York, 23-28. 
Follies of the Day — Star & Garter, Chicago, 

16-21 ; Berchel. Des Moines, Iowa, 22-24. 
Golden Crooks — Miner's Bronx, New York, 

16-21 ; Orpheum, Paterson, N. J., 28-28. 
Globe Trotters — Columbia, New York, 10-21; 

Casino. Brooklyn, 23-28. 
Hastings' Big Show — Gaiety. Omaha, 16-21 ; 

open 23-26 ; Gaiety, Kansas City, 30-May 4. 
Howe's, Bam, Kissing Girls — Ltfrlc, Dayton, 

16-21 ; Olympic, Cincinnati, 23-28. 
Hip, Hip, Hooray Girls — Palace, Baltimore, 

16-21 ; Gaiety, Washington, D. c, 23-28. 
Hello, New York — Casino, Philadelphia, 16- 

21; Miner's, Bronx, New York, 23-28. 
Irwin's Big Show — Gaiety, St. Louts, 16-21 ; 

Chicago, 23-28. 
Irwin's Majesties — Gaiety, Kansas City, 16- 

21; Gaiety, St. Louis, 23-28. 
Liberty Girls— i-Orpbenm, Paterson, N. J., 16- 

21; Empire, Hoboken, 23-27. 
Maids of America — Bastable, Syracuse. 16- 

18: Lumbers. Utlca. 19-21; Gaiety, Mon- 
treal. 28-28. 

Marlon's. Dave, Show — Star, Cleveland, 16- 
21 ; Empire, Toledo, O., 23-28. 

Midnight Maidens — Park. Bridgeport, 19-21 ; 
Colonial, Providence, 23-28. 

Million-Dollar Dolls — Casino, Brooklyn, 16- 
21; Empire, Newark, N. J., 23-28. 





Merry Bounders — Empire, Albany. 16-21 ; 

Boston, 23-28. 
New York Girls — Gaiety, Washington, 16-21 ; 

Gaiety, Pittsburg, 23-28. 
Puss Puss— Gaiety, Boston, 16-21; Grand, 

Hartford, Conn., 23-28. 
Bag Doll In Bagland — Gaiety, Montreal, 16- 

21 ; Empire, Albany, N. Y ., 23-28. 
Rosebud Girls — Berchel, Des Moines, la., 16* 

18 ; Gaiety, Omaha, Neb., 23-28. 
Beeves', Al, Show— Empire, Brooklyn, 16-21; 

Park, Bridgeport, Conn., 26-28. 
Spiegel's Revue — Corinthian, Rochester, 16- 

21 : Bastable, Syracuse, N. Y„ 23-25 ; Lum- 
bers, Dtica, 26-28. 
Snorting Widows — Colombia, Chicago, 16-21 ; 

Gaiety, Detroit, 23-28. 
Star A Garter Sbow — Olympic, Cincinnati, 

16-21; Chicago, 23-28. 
Some Show — Empire, Toledo, 16-21 ; Lyric, 

Dayton, O., 23-28. 
Step Lively Girls — Gaiety, Pittsburg, 16-21 ; 

Star, Cleveland, O., 23-28. 
Sydell's, Bose, Sbow — Poaghkeepsle, 19-21; 

Hnrtlg * Seamon's, New York, ^3-28. 
Sightseers — Colonial, Providence, 16-21 ; Bos- 
ton, 23-28. 
Sldman, Sam, Sbow — Hnrtlg & Seamon's, New 

York, 16-21; Empire, Brooklyn, 23-28. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Empire. . Newark. 

N. J, 16-21; Casino. Philadelphia, 28-28. 
Watson & Wroth e Sbow — Gaiety, Buffalo, 

16-21 ; COrlntbian, Rochester, N. Y., 23-28. 
Watson's, Billy, Show — Empire. Hoboken, 16- 

21; People's, Philadelphia, 23-28. 
Welch. Ben. Show— Grand, Hartford, 16-21 ; 

Jacques, Waterbury, Conn., SS-38. 



Williams - , Mollle. Sbow— Open week, 16-21 ; 
Gaiety, Kansas City, Mo., 23-28. 

American Circuit 

Americans — Youngstown, 19-21 ; Penn Cir- 
cuit, 23-28. 
Anto Girls — Cadillac, Detroit, 16-21; open, 

23-28; Englewood, Chicago. 30-May 4. 
Broadway Belles — Standard, St. Louis, 16-21 

Terre Haute, Ind., 23-2S.. 
Beauty, Youth A Folly — Gaiety, Minneapolis, 

16-21 ; Star, St. Paul. 23-28. 
Cabaret Girls — Open week, 16-21 ; Century, 

Kansas City. Mo., 23-28. 
Charming Widows — Englewood, Chicago. 10- 

21; Gaiety, Milwaukee, Wis.. 23-28. 
Cherry Blossoms — Niagara Falls, 19-21 ; 

Star, Toronto, Out., 23-28. 
Darlings of Paris — Majestic, Scranton. Pa., 

16-21: Gaiety, Brooklyn, N. Y., 23-28. 
French Frolics — Century, Kansas City. 10-21 ; 

Standard, St. Louis. 23-28. 
Follies of Pleasure — Star. St. Paul, 16--M : 

open 23-28; Century, Kansas City, Mo., 

30-May 4. 
Frolics of 1910 — Gaiety. Bimo.1t . nu-ji j 

Academy, Jersey City, N. J., 23-28. 
Girls From the Follies — Gaiety, Baltimore, 

16-21 ; Phlladelp i», : :M!n. 
Girls From Joyland — Empire, Cleveland, 16- 

21 i Erie. Pa., 23-24 ; Ashtabula, o , 25 ; 

Park, Youngtitown, 1:6-28. 

Ginger Girls — Howard, Boston, 16-21 : New 
Bedford, 23-25 : Worcester, 20-28. 

Crown-Up Babies — Gaiety. Philadelphia, 16- 
21 ; Mt. Carmel, Pa., 23 : Shenandoah, 24 : 
WUkesbarre. 25-28. 



Hello Girls — Gaiety, Milwaukee, 16-21 ; Gaie- 
ty, Minneapolis. 23-28. 

High Life Girls — Star. Toronto, 16-21 ; Savoy. 
Hamilton, Out., 23-28. 

Hello Paris — Star, Brooklyn, 16-21 ; Hoiyoke, 
Mass., 23-25; SprtnKfleld. 26-28. 

Lady Buccaneers — Gilmore, Springfield, 18- 
21; Howard. Boston. 23-28. 

Lid Lifters — Academy, Jersey City, N. J., 16- 
21 ; close. 

Mischief Makers — Gaiety. Chicago. 16-21 ; 
Majestic. Indianapolis. 23-28. 

Monte Carlo Girls— Open week, 16-21 ; Gaiety, 
Chicago. 23-28. 

Military Maids— Trenton, N. J., 19-21; Star, 
Brooklyn, 23-28. 

Pace Makers — Open week. 16-21 : Englewood, 
Chicago. 28-28. 

Parisian Flirts — Schenectady. 18-21 ; Blng- 
bamton, N. Y., 23-24 : Oneida, 25 ; Inter- 
national, Niagara Palls, N. Y.. 26-28. 

Record Breakers — Lyceum, Columbus, 0.. 
16-21; Newark, O., 23; Zanesvllle, 24; 
Canton. 25; Akron. 26-28. 

Review of 1917 — Savoy, Hamilton, Can., 
16-21. 

September Morning Glories — Penn Circuit. 
16-21; Gaiety. Baltimore. 23-28. 

Social Follies — Buckingham. Louisville, 16- 
21 ; Lyceum, Columbus, O.. 23-28. 

Tempters — Olympic, New York, 18-21 ; Ma- 
jestic, Scranton. Pa., 23-28. 

Tango Queens — Akron, 19-21 ; Empire, Cleve- 
land. O.. 23-28. 

Thoroughbreds — Majestic, Indianapolis, 16- 
21 ; Buckingham. Louisville. 23-28. 

Tourists — Worcester, 10-21 ; Amsterdam. N. 
T.. 23-24 : Hudson. Schenectady. 26-28. 

IT. S. Beauties— Trocadero, Philadelphia, 

10-21 ; Olympic. Ktw York, 23-28. 
White's. Pat. Gaiety Girls— Majestic, Wilkes 

Barn-, if 21 ; South Bethlehem. Pa., 23 ; 

Faston, 24 ; Pottstown. 25 ; Trenton. N. J.. 

-0-28. 



NOW IS THE TIME TO SING 

Geo. M. Cohan's Famous Patriotic Song 

You're a Grand Old Flag 

Also Nora Bayes' Sensational Hawaiian Song Success 

Hicki Hoy 

Professional Copies ariaiOrcKestrations Now Ready 

MAURICE RICHMOND MUSIC CO., Inc., 145 West 45th Street, New York 



Ashes to Ashes— Dust to Dust; There Is One Place That a Woman Dare Trust 

PARFAIT MODE SHOP 



A Trial Witt Convince YOU 
A FE1GENBAUM & FELIX YOUNG, Mgn. 



MS W. 4Sth St, Suite 7*2, New York 



Phone Sssf Bryant 



30c— BIG BUNCH— 30c 

.ntr- ?&«•&£ 1 &* 9 8J58; 

£180 Bread St., Providence, K, I, 



DOLLY CONNOLLY 



CHEAP, Trunkful Woman's Stage 
Clothes, been used, banjo, showy stage 
hangings, other things. Phone Mrs. S. 
FIELDS, Flatbush 5398. 



For Sale 

DAD'S THEATRICAL HOTEL 
-Philadelphia- - 

Write for particulars 



WANTED 

High class Lady rag singer. 10 weeks, 
good money. HARRY DEAN, Hotel 
Adams Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

WANTED 

FOB PATJCEB'S UXCLE TO* COMPACT, 
people la all lines; woman for Riisn to doable 
Ophelia; woman for Topsy; child for Bvs; man 
for Phlness; double St. Claire. Other* write. Hotel 
Show. No parade. We pay all. Low. sure salary. 
WK. REAP, Bennington. Vt., or TH08. WORE, 
Coboorg, Ont. 

THE PELHAMS 

WANT 

FOR REP. UNDER CANVA8 

Gen. bos. men and character man with specialties. 
Comedian, strong enough in parts and specialties 
to feature, Man to assist In ea&Taa and ran props. 
AU send photos and state lowest . Re hearsals May 
4th, open May 14th. Address THE 
Plates. Erie Co.. Pa. 



April. 1916 

25 Weeks with 

Theo. Lorch Co., 

Colo. Springs. 



A.X LIBERTY 



ELROY VVARD 

For StocK or Production 



April, 1917 

26 Weeks with 

Lcwin Flayers, 

Wichita 



HEAVIES 



SECONDS 



Height, S ft. 10; weight, 155; age, 23. Possess all Stock requirements — familiar with current Stock 
releases. Strictly sober and can St 
MILTON, MS E. Douglas, Wichita. 



releases. Strietly_sober and_can appreciate a thoroughly professional engagement. Care THE 



LISTEN, SINGERS 

We Offer These Two Hits for Your Approval 

"She's Coming from Ireland" 
"The German Blues" w» Neutral. 

THE ZOELLER MUSIC CO. 

312 Republic Bid*. Louisville, Ky. 

WANTED 

For Ginnivan Dramatic Co. 

Under canvas. Ingenue, leading 
woman, and trombone player, must join 
on wire. FRANK R. GINNIVAN, 
Hudson, Ind. 

WANTED 

Actresses, actors, chorus girls, agents, 
pianist, useful people all lines. Write, 
state age, height, weight, and lowest 
summer salary, long season. Address 
Harry Hayte, General Delivery, 
Oneida, N. Y. 



WAMTpn fan to play string instrument 
Wlfllv. • a.** or Saxophone; must sing Tenor 
for harmony and solo to join recognized Act 
now w orking. Write at once to BANJO 
"JAZZ" BOYS, Gen. Delivery, Atlantic City. 
N. J. 



WANTED— DRAMATIC PEOPLE 

for Ly ceum and Chautauqua. Send photo. 
CLIFTON MALLORY, II Evans Street, 
Auburn. N. Y. 



MADISON'S BUDGET 

*_T 1 /» Standard the world orer. 

1*0 III Con tec tM Include 12 orlglnsl 
monologues. 8 greet acts for 
two males and 7 for male and female, a 
bright Irish act for three people. 20 sure- 
fire parodies, 4 professional minstrel first - 
psrts, a screaming tabloid comedy; also hun- 
dreds of nifty gags snd fanny sldswalk bits. 
MADISON'S BUDGET No. IS costs ONE 
DOT.T.AB. JAKES XADISOH, IMS Third 

iTBflU,, New York. 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



ETHEL 



EARL 



ARNOLD1& TAYLOR 

"PUT OUT" 

BY BLANCHE MERRILL 

WEEK APRIL 23d, ROYAL THEATRE, NEW YORK CITY 

DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 



GUIRAN m NEWELL 



CHINESE CIRCUS 

See U» ThU Week Alhambrm, N. Y.; Next 

Week Keitk's Phila. Booked Solid 

Direction MISS GLADYS BROWN, 

WM. H. HENNESSY 



A NEW PATRIOTIC SONG, A THRILLING WAR SONG, A THRILLING WAR SONG 

"THE SWEETHEART OF THE U. S. A." 



I.-L .lOVJ.F.U TO c. o s or 



Professional Cor 



^ed Sim 



W. HENRY PEASE PUBLISHING CO".'. MOUNT VERNON N. Y 




Just one of Natural "Orrandaitdlodd ' ta$ tht Public 1m. COLONIAL THIS WEEK 



THE GBL YOU CANT FORGFT 



dest Number of Yours I have ever had 'L MAUD LAMBERT. 

With conditions as they are right Now you arifforce'Sonfc on the Public- It's NATURAL*HITS' , or NOTHING ! 

IE STORYBOOK BALL" "AMERICA TO-DAY" "STRUTTERS 7 BALL" 



GRttTEST NOVELTY S0N6 Of THE A6E by HOHTGOMERY and PERKY 



by HERBERT MOORE fui W.R.W1LUAMS. 



bySHEUON 



BROOKS Sucjceuorte*WALKIN"IHE DOS' 



Prof. Copies Freehr Recent Program. ORCH.in ANY KEY-WILL ROSS1TER The Chiaigo Publisher 71 W.RAHDOLPH ST.XHICAGO. ILL— NO NEW YORK OFFICE. 



WANTED 

FOR NEXT SEASON 

BURLESQUE PEOPLE 

OF ALL KINDS 

-TO GOOD CHORUS GIRLS-' 

Wardrobe Furnished— No Half Salaries 

FARES TO AND FROM OPENING 
AND CLOSING POINTS 

Address JACK SINGER, Colombia Building, New York 
"Behman Show" "Hello New York" "Lid Lifters Co." 



B 
O 
O 

K 

E 
D 

S 

o 

L 
I 
D 



MUD6L-M0RTOH 



* r*tf or 

MLLjODY- 




H 
A 
R 
R 
Y 

W 
E 
B 
E 
R 



THE NOVELTY FOUR 

Slim, Elmer, Cy and Heinle send a Hello to their friends. 

DIRECTION MARK LEVY 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



HARRY VON TiLZER'S 

WONDERFUL OVERNIGHT HIT! 

Read PRESIDENT WILSON'S PROCLAMATION of Monday morning and sec If this song don't hit ihe.naU on tin- 

head! .Here is the title: 



ammer 



ow 



By singing' this song you will be expressing the sentiment; of the President to millions of people and be doing .a patriotic 
duty for your country. There hasn't been a song in years that will get the applause that this song will! 

WIRE FOR COPY AND ORCHESTRATION IN ANY KEY 

HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO. 



222 West 46th Street, New York City 



BEN BORNSTEIN 
Prof. Mgr. 



MEYER.. CO HEN 




Ts Profeulonal Peeplt: What da we are for Um hlih cost of matrrtair Our prices are 
lower instead of higher and our goods are the rery beat; couldn't be duplicated elsewhere 
under an; price. We will make yon a $25 toupee for $15 and send tt to jem subject 
to 24 hours' examination, satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded, or we will allow 
you a 20% discount on the new Patent toupee, patented Jane 28, 1915, with nine 
superior claims, molar price $30, by —llwHn tie Clliser. 

LOMBARD BA.MBIPSJA. CO. 

■aarfasruin wf tks warte Faateea Bastetaa Teases alttnr. arte* 50l. atr tat, aortwalf 

113 Munroe St, 497 Washington St. Lynn, Man. 




10th Year— SUMMER 

WANTED 



AND WINTER— 10th Year 

LEADING MAN 



VERSATILE 
For Lou Whitney Stock Co. 

Al wardrobe and sobriety poaitively essential. Single Vaude. Act, change for week. 
Photoi, Programs and lowest salary. WELSH AND WALBOURN, Inlay City. 



Send 



LEW 


SHARP 




RUBE COLDE 




5- 


STREET URCHINS - 5 






Fun — Fast and Furious 




HARRY GOODMAN JOHN GREE> 


MACK COLEMAN 






IN VAUDEVILLE 





<-2#,fc 




Aaai.ted by FLOR D'ALIZA 
Prrmmring Their Wonderful Roosters 
Chaj. Bornhaupt Keeps Them Crowinj. 



WANTED AX ALL XI IVIES 

BURLESQUE PEOPLE 



CHAS. H. WALDRON 



Waldron's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



AT UBERTY NOW 
Corinne Carpenter Charles J. Newman . 

Inseane Leads ProdadnaT Director — EoaYiat and OTiaiaulwn 

I, A.T.S.E. All Beqoiromeats, Efficiency Plaa 

Keaponalble Stock or Bep. Hers, writ* or wire. Permanent Address 20 Wood Street, OMtown, Maine. 



Wanted for Trumbull Players 

A General Bitatneaa Man with good specialties. Comedian with specialties. Director that is 
capable of putting on high-class plays. Other People write, specialty people preferred. Only 
experienced, reliable, sober people considered. State all in first letter. Send Photographs and 
Programs. Address LAWRENCE R TRUMBULL, Hgr. Trumbull Flayers, Susquehanna, Pa.. 
week April 16th, or New York Office, Room 537, 1402 Broadway. 



RELIABILITY 

FRANK 



DUFRANE 



SOBRIETY 



AT UBERTY 

Past season "Elsmere Stock." N. Y. C, and "The Guilty Woman" production Age 25, 
height S ft. 10V4, weight 167. A hard worker in all lines. Stock preferred. RELIABLE 
managers ONLY. Address No. 30 Liberty St., Now Bedford, Mm.. 

EXPERIENCE ABILITY 



RUTH ROBINSON 

1 1— rtinsj Woman 

MOROSCO THEATRE, LOS ANGELES 

America's Foremost Productions 




TENNEY 



like tha Parcftl Past "daUrara th» food*." Act*, .ketch.., and monolsfaaa, Wlittw 
right Thay'r© fell of originality, "pap** and "grt-orer." Don't with for % GOOD 
act. bar* Tenner writ* 70a em. Corraapeadasea aolieitad. 

AT.T.KH BPEVCn BgC, Ko. IttS Broadway, He* York City. 



THERESA L. MARTIN 

In Vaudeville 

Assisted by JOE KELLY N. V. A/. DOROTHY MAURE1CE 



VI.OLET VANCE 

- ~ SINGING COMEDIENNE. IN VAUDEVILLE. . 

RUSSELL, GREENE and JONES 

Singing — Acrobatic — Dancing 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



Lady Partner (Bet. 30-40) 

Wanted who ens sing, . play piano or dance a la 
Irian or Scotch F ling. Will teach, state particu- 
lars. YAUllE V 11XZ, ear* Clipper. 



ADVANCE AGENT AT LIBERTY 

Roote, book and wildcat, handle brnab. Boberapd 
relia ble. Responsible manager* only. WTLT. 

BEECHXB. St. Joiuurllle, V. T. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 



NEWS 



REVIEWS 



STATE RIGHTS 



RE LEAS ES 
FORUM 



STATE RIGHTS ORGANIZATION 

CAUS ES MUCH DISCUSSION 

Proposed Plan to Weld Country's Buyers Into a Solid Body 

Criticised by Several as Impossible, While Others 

Like Progressive Idea 



The news that a plan is on foot to or- 
ganize state rights buyers into an organ- 
ization of their own, as revealed in The 
Cuffeb, last week, was the cause of much 
discussion and some argument for several 
days past. 

Several authorities in the producers' 
camp offered detailed objection to the plan. 
The advocates of the project, however, met 
these statements with reinforced argu- 
ments. 

H. Z. Levine, manager of the Edward 
Warren Productions, which is just now 
exploiting "The Warfare of the Flesh," 
takes a conspicuous stand in the pro- 
ducers' group, as one wbo is heart and 
80Ul in support of co-operative action by 
the buyers. Several other producers ad- 
mitted that the co-operative movement was 
a logical, natural, progressive step. 

"Organization by state rights buyers is 
the only thing that can save the business 
from ultimate destruction," said Mr. Le- 
vine. "State rights production came into 
temporary vogue about five years ago. It 
met a long felt want, as a relief against 
oppression of exhibitors and public by 
program companies. It seemed in a fair 
way to be the biggest, finest field of oper- 
ation in the industry. Bat the bottom 
dropped ont of state righting within a 
few months, because producers flooded the 
market with junk. They put out bad 
films, fooled the public and cheated state 
rights buyers. 

"In the natural cycle of events, state 
righting is now again coining into its own. 
The public and the exhibitors are again 
restive against program domination. We 
are being carried on the crest of a strong 
wave of sentiment for the -method of in- 
dependent exchange and open market 
booking. 

"There is a wonderful opportunity to 
make this business permanent. If it is 
to be made permanent, and the . mistakes 
of the past avoided, the buyers must or- 
ganize. 

"The manufacturers must be encouraged 
to produce better films, with the assur- 
ance they are working on solid ground. 
There should be a working agreement be- 
tween the producers and buyers." 

Mr. Levine advocates the appointment 
of competitive producers, to act without 
fee or commission, as a committee to ap- 
praise the various productions. 

Leon J. Rnbenstein, wbo is handling 
the distribution of the Flora Finch Com- 
edy Film Co.; Joseph Farnham, manager 
of the Frohman Amusement Co., offering 
"God's Man": Harry Havens, of the Unity 
and Ultra Film Companies, and M. H. 
Hoffman, owner of "The Sin Woman" 
American rights, entered the forum on the 
negative side of the argument. 

Joseph Lee, one of the leading buyers 
of the country, stood with Mr. Levine and 
the several other producers wbo indorsed 
the league idea. 

"If there were a fixed minimum of rev- 
enue guaranteed to all producers for every 
production," said Mr. Rnbenstein, "then 
the buyers might successfully conduct 
league operations, with a clearing house 
to work for them in New York. But 
such a guarantee is impossible. The pro- 
ducers have got to face the big gamble al- 
ways of suffering a total loss on some 
production. They, therefore, will be op- 
posed to dealing with a clearing house 
which might seek to standardize buying 
prices for films, with the aim of keeping 
cost down for the buyers. The producer 
must retain the right to get all he can out 



of every film, regardless of what the film 

cost to produce. 

"It's the sparkle in a man's eye when 
he sees a film that should fix the value of 
it. There are over 100 per cent, more fail- 
ures than successes in feature film produc- 
tion. Therefore let the producer get what 
the merit of his successes calls for, when 
his pictures are winners." 

Mr. Farnham qualified his objections .to 
the clearing house plan. 

"It might be all right for the trade in 
feature films of the second class," he said. 
"It could not possibly work efficiently for 
big, top notch films. If the state rights 
on a certain film are worth $15,000 to a 
man on the coast, it is worth while for 
that man to take a trip across the country 
and see the film himself before buying. 
No buyer of such films would let any 
other man pass on them for him. They 
don't even empower their own special rep- 
resentatives to buy; they simply listen to 
recommendations from the latter." 

Mr. Havens asserted that state rights 
buyers were too much in conflict with each 
other through the nature of their business 
to ever work effectively as an organization. 

"The state rights business is going 
crazy," he said. "Small time producers 
and buyers are flocking into the field like 
flies. They're shoving a raft of mediocre, 
second rate pictures onto the open mar- 
ket as feature films. They're baHybooing 
the game to death." 

Mr. Hoffman took the stand that state 
rights trading is pretty well standardized. 



STATE RIGHTS "HONOR SYSTEM" 

Owing to the receipt of many offers of 
phenomenal rentals for "The Honor Sys- 
tem" from exhibitors in and around 
Greater New York, the Fox Film Corpora- 
tion has established a special booking de- 
partment to handle the film in the city 
and the State of New York and New 
Jersey. Winfield Sheehan is in charge of ■ 
the state rights disposition of the film for 
the country. He has received offers ag- 
gregating $400,000. 

LECTURES WITH PICTURE 

Professor Charles E. Maxwell, of the 
American Red Cross Society, is travelling 
through New York State with the feature 

picture, "Race Suicide," delivering lec- 
tures on birth control in conjunction with 
the film. The features has only been ont 
a couple of weeks bnt has played so suc- 
cessfully in Troy, Schenectady and sev- 
eral other cities that contracts have been 
signed for re-engagements. 



TO STATE RIGHT "BLACK STORK" 

The Sheriott Pictures Corporation an- 
nounces its decision to state right "The 
Black Stork," the picture featuring Dr. 
H. J. Haiselden, the "Chicago physician 
who allowed a terribly malformed baby to 
die rather than save it by a simple opera- 
tion and let it go through life in misery 
and suffering. The film has played to big 
business at the La Salle Theatre in 
Chicago. 



NATHANSON FILM DRAWING 

Since the war cloud has burst in the 
United States, Nat Nathanson, of the Fed- 
eral Feature Film Company, reports that 
their picture, "Charlie's Preparedness," is 
the biggest kind of a money-getter. It is 
a Chaplin picture on the order of the Chap- 
lin Review. 



STATE RIGHTS BUYERS HERE 

Following are some of the prominent 
state rights buyers who were in New 
York last week: 

B. Amsterdam, president of the Master- 
piece Film Attractions, Philadelphia, who 
bought the rights to "The Deemster" for 
Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and District 
of Columbia. 

E. V. Johnson, of Turner & Dahnkin, 942 
Market Street, San Francisco. 

True. Thompson and father of Dallas, 
buyers for Texas and a group of Southern 
States. 

E. R. Haas and Sidney Miller, of the 
Hy Art Film Co., Washington, D. C. 

M. M. Feeley, for Wichita Feature Film 
Co. 

H. P. Wolfburg, of Pittsburgh. 

HOFFMAN BUYS "SIN WOMAN" 

M. H. Hoffman, former general manager 
of the Universal Film Manufacturing Co., 
resigned suddenly from that company last 
week, and purchased the entire world 
rights to "The Sin Woman," which was 
the first production of the George Backer 
Film Corporation. Mr. Hoffman also con- 
tracted to handle the distribution of the 
entire future output of the Backer com- 
pany. 

Coincident with this, he took over the 
offices of Mr. Backer, which has just re- 
cently been established by the latter. The 
Backer corporation, of which George 
Lederer is director, plans to produce eight 
big feature films a year. 

TO FILM "WHO'S YOUR NEIGHBOR?'' 
The Master Drama Features, Inc., will 
begin work soon on its first production, 
"Who's Yonr Neighbor?" a screen version 
of an original drama by Willard Mack. 
The company was formed by Edward 
Small, who for years was a recognized 
leader in Vaudeville management, and 
Herman Becker, treasurer of the Robert 
Warwick Film Co. S. Rankin Drew, direc- 
tor of "The Girl Philippa" and many other 

notable successes, has been engaged to 
direct for the new company. A strong 
east also has been procured. The produc- 
tion will be state righted. 

WILLIAMSON FILM READY 
Will jam wo A Brothers are ready to re- 
lease their first independently produced 
attraction, "The Submarine Eye." The 
unusual film creation required a year in 
the making. It portrays scenes principally 
under the water and partly on land. It 
was made in the waters of the West 
Indies. 

War figures strongly in the drama of 
"The Submarine Eye." The achievements 
of the inverted periscope which figures in 
the scenes, provides a strong suggestion 
for the coast defense of the United States. 



SUBSEA FILM WINS ON COAST 

San Francisco, April 15. — "Twenty 
Thousand Leagues Under the Sea," the 
thrilling subsea spectacle produced by the 
Williamson Brothers, has broken all rec- 
ords for attendance at film attractions in 
this city. The attraction played to packed 
audiences for a week's run at the Cort 
Theatre, twice daily at prices ranging 
from 25 to 75 cents. 



COHEN LIMITING TERRITORY 
Max Cohen, who is releasing "The Fury 
of Civilization" and "America Is Ready," 
has just returned from an extended trip 
over the country. He declares his produc- 
tions will be disposed of on an ironclad 
basis recognizing only seventeen terri- 
tories. 



UNITY TERRITORY TAKEN 

The Unity Sales Corp.. have disposed of 
all of the state right territory for their 
feature picture, "The Woman Who 
Dared," excepting a few states in the 
middle west and the South. 



MANY BIG FILMS 

ARE OFFERED TO 

STATE RIGHTERS 

. Following are current and pending re- 
leases for state lighters: 

Cinema War News Syndicate — "Amer- 
ican War News Serial." 
Cines Film Co. — "The Fated Hour." 
Sheriott Pictures, Corp. — "The Black 

Stork." 

Max Cohen Co. — "The Fury of Civil- 
ization," and "America la Ready." 

Edward Warren Co. — "The Warfare of 
the Flesh." 

Cosmofotofilm Co. — 'The Manx-Man." 
Bernstein Film Productions — "Who 
Knows?", in preparation; "The Seven 
Cardinal Virtues." 

Paragon Films— "The Whip." 
Frohman Amusement Co. — "God's Man." 
B. W. Oopeland— "The Pendleton 
Round-up of 1916." 

Arrow Film Corporation — "The Deem- 
ster." 

M. H. Hoffman Co. — "The Sin Woman." 

Popular Pictures Corporation — "A 

Woman Wills" ; "The Princess of India" ; 

"The Burglar and the 'Lady" ; "The Little 

Orphan" : "Ignorance." 

The Corona Cinema Co., Inc. — ''The 
Corse of Eve." 

Hoffman Film Co. — "Buffalo Bill's Laat 
Performance." 

De Luxe Spoilers Co. — "The (De Luxe) 
Spoilers." 

Balboa Amusement Producing Co. — 
"The Twisted Thread." 

Graphic Features— "The Woman and 
the Beast" 

Abraxas and Werner — "The Bar Sin- 
ister." 

E. I. S. Motion Picture Corporation — 
"Trooper 44." 

Sol L. Lesser— 'The Ne'er-Do-Well." 

LaSalle Film Co.— "Lafeo Comedies." 

Grand Feature Film Co. — "Rex Beach 
Himself." 

Enlightenment Photoplays Corporation 
—"Enlighten Thy Daughter." 

Hanover FUm Co. — "How Uncle Sam 
Prepares." 

Ultra Pictures Corporation — "The 
Woman Who Dared," 

Flora Finch Comedy Films Corpo- 
ration — "War Prides." 

Variety Films — "The Price ofHerSouL" 

Eugenic Film Co. — "Birth." 
- Williamson Bros. — "The Submarine 
Eye." 

Shermann-Elliott, Inc. — "The Crisis." 

Universal Film Co. — "God's Law." 

Benjamin Chapin Studios — "The Lin- 
coln Cycle." 



"WARFARE OF FLESH" TOMORROW 

"The Warfare of the Flesh" win receive 

its official trade showing at the Broad- 
way Theatre tomorrow, Thursday, morning 
at 10 o'clock. This production is certain 
to hold rank in the top division of super- 
feature films. Private showings have in- 
spired several of the most responsible film 
men in New York to speak of it in super- 
lative terms. 

The picture has a cast loaded with im- 
pressive film names. It includes Sheldon 
Lewis, who starred in "The Iron Claw"; 
Walter Hampden, star of "The Servant 
in the House" ; Charlotte Ives, holding a 
stellar role in the Morosco Broadway hit, 
"The Brat"; Marie Shot well, appearing 
in "Enlighten Thy Daughter" ;, Harry Ben- 
ham, of "The Million-Dollar Mystery"; 
and Theodore Friebus, the idol of the 
Castle Square Theatre, Boston. 

The story has an allegorical tren d , with 
the proposition rising ont of it that virtue 
depends solely on victory of character in 
conflict with evil and temptation. 



FEDERAL BUYS "FATED HOUR" 

The Federal Feature Film Company has 
purchased "The Fated Hour," a six reel 
melodrama, from the Cines Film, Corp. 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"THE DEEMSTER" 

Arrow Film Corporation. 

Btate Rights release. 

Cut 

Daniel Ifylrea Derteent Hall Caine 

Mona. . Marian Sicaync 

The Bishop. ■ Sidney Bracy 

The Deemster . .Albert Frpom 

B*ean -K. Barnes Clarendon 

Davey. Ale* Hall 

Quavle James Levering 

Billy Quilleash Ben Lodge 

Hommey Beg Thomas O'M alley 

Story — From Hall Caine's great novel, The 

Deemster. Produced on the Isle of Man. 

Time of action — Early in the eighteenth 

century. 
Action — Interesting. 
Continuity — Good. 
Suspense — Very effective. 
Detail — Masterful. 
Atmosphere — Rich. 
Photography— Good. 

Beroalks. 

Hall Caine's tremendous piece of fiction, 
"The Deemster," is translated into a -neb 
of actual happenings, and his characters 
are made to live and breathe with perfect 
realism in the film production that opened 
a New York ran Sunday night at the 
Broadway Theatre. 

Derwent Hall Caine, the author's son, 
brings not only the prestige of bis name. 



but a fine personal genius into the play as 
the principal character. 

The wonderful love and tragedy story of 
"The Deemster" would probably be an in- 
spiring film spectacle without the presence 
of the younger Mr. Caine, but with him 
in the cast the current production becomes 
historic. 

There are thrills throughout the play, 
and a fair proportion of trick photograph; 
from the highest altitude of film science. 

Young Mr. Caine is of rather 'alight 
physical build for the part of the young 
fisherman who must struggle with a knife 
wielding madman on the edge of a cliff, but 
the hero of the piece portrays this action 
with fine effectiveness. The producers em- 
ploy a well conceived idea at the opening 
of the play, by revealing the younger Mr. 
Caine reading a letter from his father, 
offering his full indorsement of the film. 
Box Office Value. ' 

Worthy of a long run in any theatre. 



"OPEN BOOKING" FOR GOLDWYN 

Samuel Goldfish, president of the Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corporation issued the an- 
nouncement last week that Goldwyn will 
offer all its productions to its American 
exhibitors on the "open booking" plan. 

"Our policy has been dictated by the 
exhibitors themselves," he said. "We can 
appreciate the resentment the exhibitors 
feel against being compelled to take many 
pictures they do not want, in order to 
obtain a few stars in a group that they 
can play to a profit." 




Board: 



exub Buns 

gnu »■ cnaa _ 
arrsus BOruNB 

ft.miHT ■AT O 
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Goldwyn' 8 Decision Is: 
"Open Bookings" 

THE REASONS behind Gold- 
wyn's adoption of this pol- 
icy are: 

1. Thousands of the nation's ex- 
hibitors have advised it. 

2. Each Goldwyn production will 
be strong enough to stand on its 
merits, without leaning on the pic- 
ture behind or the picture ahead. 

3. Exhibitors should have the 
right to rent the group of pic- 
tures they want without being forced 
to take other pictures they do not 
want. 

And— Goldwyn considers it wisest to 
let exhibitors use their own brains 
in deciding what pictures are best for 
their theatres and their communities. 

Goldwyn guarantees a minimum pro- 
duction of twenty-six pictures a year 
from the date of its first release in 
September. 

Thousands of exhibitors already have 
written to inquire about bookings be- 
cause they believe Goldwyn Pictures 
will solve their most troublesome 
problem— the problem of quality. 

Are you on the Goldwyn mailing 
list to receive our announcements? 

Ooldwyn^g^icturcs 
Corporation 

IS East 4Z& Straat New York City 

Telephone: Vanderbflt It 



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A MAGNIFICENT ATTRACTION for 
the Big Tuna. A story el Romantic 
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verted underwater perisco p e and to 
discover submarine boots, deadly 
mines, etc. Splendid assortment of 5- 
COlor lithographs aad complete musical 
scoro for any also orchestra. 

WILLIAMSON BROTHERS 

Originators and Sola Producers of 
Submarine Photoplays 

8th Floor, Longacre Bldg., 

New York City 
ERNEST SHIPMAN, Manager 




^f/lH 




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WILLIAM A. BRADY 

Director-Gee oral 

WORLD PICTURES 

Presents 

Muriel Ostriche 

Aad 

Arthur Ashley 

In 

"Moral Courage" 

D ir e cte d by Ro mains Fielding 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 18, 1917 




'M€)W m 




BIG EXHIBITORS 

WAR AGAINST 

EXCHANGES 

CONFERENCE AT ASTOR 



About eight of the most powerful motion 
picture exhibitors in the country, hailing 
from cities scattered from New York to 
the coast, met Monday afternoon at the 
Aator Hotel and drew up war plans 
against the big producers. 

Secrecy clothed the movements of the 
exhibitors, bat it became known within 
a few hoars after the arrival Saturday 
of the vanguard that the; were here to 
organize a co-operative film baying league 
on a big scale. 

George W. Trendle, legal adviser of J. 
H. Kunsky, who owns a string of booses 
in Detroit and Chicago, acted as chief 
promoter of the new plan. Other men who 
are known to have been either personally 
present in the conference or represented 
there are Tom Saxe, of Milwaukee : B. W. 
Mandelbanm, of Cleveland: 'William Sie- 
vers, of St. Louis; Robert Liebler, of In- 
dianapolis; Tom Moore of Washington, 
D. C; John D. Williams, of San Fran- 
cisco, and Fred Levy of Louisville. 

The conference is reported to have dealt 
with the idea of organizing the big exhib- 
itors into a protective, co-operative group, 
to be incorporated with a capital of $20,- 
000,000. The league, it is declared, is in- 
tended to free the exhibitors from obliga- 
tion to deal with exchanges. It would 
form its members into chain groups, with 
the co-operative power to bay films for 
each section at standardized prices. 

A half dozen producers who were inter- 
viewed by The Clipper, scoffed at the 
project They declared unanimously that 
such a thing can never come to life. 

"If s silly tommyrot," said one manu- 
facturer, whose view was typical of the 
others. "These fellows have been talking 
the chain theatre method for a year." 

Another manufacturer declared the pro- 
ducers would merely refuse to do business 
with the league whenever its represent- 
atives sought to fix the price. 

It is reported that Samuel L. Rothapfel, 
of the Rialto, was invited to join the in- 
surgents. It could not be learned what 
his action was. 

The Mitchell Mark Realty Co., owner 
of the Strand, is also reported to have 
been asked to join. Mr. Mark is declared 
to have rejected the idea. 



WILL REVIVE "QUO VADIS" 

George Kleine, who was the first to 
show the film of "Quo Vadis" in America, 
will revive that picture on a gigantic 
scale. Kleine announces that this revival 
is not to be regarded as an ordinary re- 
issue, but rather as a new "Quo Vadis," 
as the film will be re-edited, new scenes 
added, with the consequent strengthening 
of the film story, and newly directed. In 
other words, according to Kleine, it will 
be a new feature picture. 

DINNER GIVEN TO ZUKOR 
The Motion Picture Directors' Associa- 
tion of New York pledged its allegiance 
and offered its services to President Wil- 
son at a dinner given at the Hotel Astor 
Tuesday evening, April 10, in honor of 
Adolph Zukor. The dinner was one of the 
most successful the association has ever 
held and included among its guests many 
notables of the film world. 



FAIRBANKS DINED EN ROUTE 

The farewell dinner tendered to Douglas 
Fairbanuks at Murray's, by President 
Green of Artcraft, just before the actor 
left for California, seems to have set a 
fashion for Fairbanks' trip to the coast. 
Shortly after the 20th Century left New 
York the film star was made the honorary 
guest of a dinner given on the train by 
the officials of the New York Central. On 
arriving in Chicago, "Doug" was rushed to 
the Illinois Athletic Club by Manager Max 
Goldstine of the local Artcraft exchange, 
where a gathering of prominent exhibitors 
and newspaper men greeted him with an- 
other dinner. 



M. P. ACTOR GETS FIVE DAYS 

Donald Williams, a motion picture 
actor, was sent to the Island last Fri- 
day by Magistrate House in the Traffic 
Court. It was Williams' second offense 
and be was sentenced to five days. 



JANE GUTHRIE WITH GOLDWYN 

Jane Guthrie, a sister of Mrs. Wilson 
Woodrow, has been engaged by the Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corp. as scenario reader. 
Like her sister Mrs. Guthrie is a writer of 
stories. 



NOBLE CALLED TO WASHINGTON 

John W. Noble, a director of the Gold- 
wyn Pictures Corp., last week received a 
call from the War Department and has- 
tened to Washington. Noble is a graduate 
West Pointer and, as a captain and en- 
gineer, saw seven years of military serv- 
ice for his government in China, the 
Philippines and in Mexico. 



FILM MANAGER ARRESTED 

Harry Samwick, manager of the Ivan 
Film Productions, Inc., was held in $500 
bail for examination today by Magistrate 
Krotel in the West Side Court on a charge 
of assaulting Ivan Abramson, president of 
the company, with a glass paper-weight 
daring an argument at a directors' meet- 
ing last week. 



WAR WON'T HURT FILMS 

Frederick L. Collins, president of He- 
ctare Pictures, has returned from an ex- 
tended trip to the Pacific Coast. He says 
that, judging from the activities on the 
coast America's entrance into the war will 
in no way harm the motion picture in- 
dustry, but on the contrary will be bene- 
ficial. 



J. S. BLACKTON, JR., ENLISTS 
J. Stuart Blackton, Jr., eldest son of 
the director general of the Vitagraph, 
joined the 13th Coast Artillery Command, 
N. Y. N. G., Company C. Young Blackton 
is producer of the national defense film, 
"Womanhood, the Glory of the Nation," 
and has just finished one called "Prepared- 
ness." 



"CIVILIZATION" IN BRAZIL 
J. Parker Read, Jr., general manager of 
the Harper Film Corp., last week received 
cables from Rio de Janeiro announcing 
that the gross receipts for the previous 
week's showing amounted to $8,000 
(American money). The Brazilian press 
is loud in its praise of the picture. 



M. P. MEN MEET 

TO PLAN FIGHT 

0NJHLL 

BIG DELEGATION FOR ALBANY 



BACH RETURNS TO N. Y. 

William Bach, general technical director 
of the Fox Film Corp., returned to New 
York last week after a stay at the Cali- 
fornia studios of more than a year. Bach 
was in charge of the installation of the 
general equipment at the California 
studios. 



Aa the result of a meeting at the Play- 
house last Monday which was called by 
Win. A. Brady, president of the National 
Association of the Motion Picture Indus- 
try, two hundred motion picture men 
pledged themselves to take the 8.45 train 
for Albany tomorrow morning to meet the 
Senatorial committee, and to use Mr. 
Brady's own words, "to demand their 
rights, not to plead for them." 

Among those who spoke at the meeting 
were W. W. Irwin, P. A. Powers, Samuel 
H. Trigger, Win. J. Seabury and Win. A. 
Brady. Mr. Brady made the last address 
and delivered one of his characteristically 
forceful speeches with a "hit straight from 
the shoulder" in every sentence. 

Among other things he pointed out that 
the very root and branch of the motion 
picture industry was threatened by the 
proposed legislation. Under it, he said, 
New York film producers would pay 
a yearly tax of $500,000. The eyes of 
every State in the Union are upon New 
York he declared, and if the bill becomes 
a law seven other States were ready to 
follow in the footsteps of the Empire 
State. 

He pointed out that the New York pro- 
ducer would be driven out of the State. 
That, at the present time, when he would 
be called upon by his country to do his 
share, which he would gladly do, he was 
picked out by the State to bear a burden 
he could not sustain. Mr. Brady wound 
up his talk by asking those present to 
pledge themselves to go to Albany to- 
morrow morning. 

Among those who signified that they 
would go were J. E. Brnlatour, Wm. M. 
Seabury, Walter W. Irwin, Sidney S. 
Cohen, Joseph Schenck, Henry Cohen, Jack 
Sherrill, J. Sargent and Wm. A. Brady as 
individuals. 

The Triangle Film Corp. will be repre- 
sented by R. W. France, L. F. Guimond, 
J. F. Paine, Raymond Pawley, D. W. 
Bartlett, John Hanson, L. A. Adams, Ben 
Barber, H. R. Howe, W. N. Seligsberg, 
C. W. Barrell and several from the pro- 
duction department. 

The Universal representation wiU in- 
clude Carl Laemmle, Paul Gulick, George 
U. Stevenson, R. H. Cochrane, P. A. 
Powers, Emanuel Goldstein, Edward B. 
Mullen, Nat G. Rothstein, Kurt W. linn, 
S. B. Kramer, Henry Gainsborg, Sam 
Zierler, Hal Hodes, Joe Brandt and George 
Kann. 



CLARA YOUNG SUED 

Los Angeles, Cal., April 15. — Alleging 
desertion, James Young, actor and man- 
ager, has sued Clara Kimball Young, the 
motion picture actress, for divorce. Al- 
though she is said to be in a moving pic- 
ture studio at Pasadena, a suburb of this 
city, her husband's lawyers say that they 
have been unable as yet to serve her with 
a summons. 

— i 

DEFEATED A LAWSUIT 

The Flora Finch Comedy Film Co. 
turned Brides into Prides last week, and 
thus avoided a great big Selznick Infringe- 
ment suit L. J. Selznick threatened to 
sue if the company put its comedy satire 
of "War Brides" on the market under that 
name. The company thereupon decided to 
make the film "War Prides." 



"MADAME SHERRY" FOR PICTURES 

"Madame Sherry" is to be made into a 
film by the Authors' Film Co., with Ger- 
trude McCoy as the star. Otto Hauer- 
bach, author of the original libretto, and 
H. H. Sheldon, are making the picturized 
version. Ralph Dean will stage it. 

ACTRESS RETURNS TO TRIANGLE 

Bessie Barriscale, after an absence of 
several months, returned to the Triangle 
program and will appear in "The Snarl," 
a Kay Bee drama. 

TAGGART SUED FOR SEPARATION 

Benjamin Taggart, moving picture 
actor, is being sued by Mary Louise Tag- 
gart for a legal separation. 



PEARCE TAKES ART DRAMAS 

Southwestern Art Dramas, Inc., has 
just signed contracts with Josiah Pearce 
& Sons, of New Orleans, whereby the 
Pearce firm wiU become the exclusive dis- 
tributors of the Art Dramas program for 
the State of Louisiana. Josiah Pearce is 
one of the best known exhibitors in the 
South. He is the owner of many large 
theatres in New Orleans and other cities. 
He was formerly in the exchange business. 



AFTER CHICAGO CENSORS 

Chicago, April 15. — Second Deputy 
Funkbauser, of the morals branch of the 
Chicago Police Department, is planning a 
general shake-op of the censor board. The 
action follows disclosures made by the 
Board of Education, alleging that several 
"unfit" pictures havei$*en passed by the 



NEW EXCHANGES FOR SELZNICK 

Lewis J. Selznick announced last week 
that in future, in all centres where Selz- 
nick pictures have been distributed through 
exchanges, handling a class of films which 
Mr. Selznick considers below his standard, 
he will at once establish branches of the 
home office for the distribution of his films. 



PEARL WHITE MAKES ASCENT 

Pearl White, star of Pathe film serials, 
was hoisted to the twentieth floor last 
week on a steel girder from in front of 
the Bush Terminal Building, now in course 
of construction on West Forty-second 
Street. This feat preceded a speech to the 
crowd urging the men to enlist. 

INCORPORATES FOR $20,000 

A new moving picture company to be 
known as the Players' Producing Company 
of America has been incorporated with a 
capital stock of $20,000. Its incorporators 
are Francis M. Smith, Michael Ring and 
Henry Saks Hechheimer. 



FOX DUE BACK SUNDAY 

William Fox, who has been on a visit 
to his California studios for the past two 
months, will arrive in New York from Los 
Angeles next Sunday morning. Mr. Fox 
will be accompanied by his wife, daughter 
and secretary. 

SIGN CONTRACTS WITH LEWIS 

Mabel Julienne Scott and Mitchell 
Lewis, who appeared in the picture pro- 
duction.of "The Barrier," have signed with 
Edgar Lewis to appear in a new picture 
on which he will start work in June in 
California. 



ALICE LAKE JOINS UNIVERSAL 

Alice Lake has joined the stock of the 
Universal Film Co. at Universal City, 
Cal., where she will act before the camera 
under the direction of Jack Conway and 
Herbert Rawlinson in special features. 



H. B. WARNER IS SELIG STAR 

Henry B. Warner has become a Selig 
star and will make his first appearance 
under his new banner in The Danger 
Trial," which is scheduled as a K-E-S-E 
release April 30. 

VIRGINIA CLARK WITH GOLDEN 

Virginia Clark, who played in "The 
American Girl" for the Prizma Films, wiB 
appear in the near future in pictures pro- 
duced by the Golden Company, at the 
Crystal studios. 



CHILDERS PICTURE FINISHED 
"The Auction of Virtue," the U. S. 
Amusement Corporation production star- 
ring Naomi Childers. has just been com- 
pleted by Herbert Blacbe. It will be re- 
leased on Art Dramas program. 



NEW FOX SCENARIO HEAD 

George Bronson Howard has been en- 
gaged to take entire charge of the 
scenario department of the "William Fox 
Film Co. 



HAYES SUCCEEDS MACK 

E. J. Hayes has been appointed sales 
manager for the General Film Company 
in Buffalo succeeding W. A. V. Mack, who 
recently resigned. 



April 18, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



39 



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in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colors. 
C00 deposit with each order. ScaeH'e ti pair 
Stadia. Columbus, O. 

CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, Clubs, Batons, 
Guns, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK, 
Cincinnati. O. 

NOW READY 



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STAGE TRAINING 

Orassa. Carney. Vasesrllls. Stem Oaae- 
Isf and roots Pliy Taistt. Trttmleal 
and Practical Courses. Celebrities who 
studied under Mr. Altiene: Annette Kel- 
lenasnn. Nora Bares. Hazel Dswn, 
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Dsxle. Msry Fuller. Dolly Sisters. Taylor 
Holmes, VlTtsn Frescott, Eleanor Pslnter 
sod others. Write tor cslalosue o»en- 
tloolna study desired. 

Allien* Theatre School el Acting 

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Entrance 225 W. 57th St.. New York. 



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TIGHTS 

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PRICES the LOWEST 



Gold sad surer Brooedea, Bilks, aatiaa. 

Theatrical Jewelzy, bangles, Zta 

Bold sad Silrer Trunmlage. 

Wl»s, Bauds sad all Goods TksatriosJ. 

Catalogues and Samples upon request. 

When asking (or Catalogue, pleae* mantlon 
what goods ere wanted. 

SIEGMAN & WEIL 

8. W. Cor. S7th St. aad IfarHaea Are. 
THB THEATRICAL SUPPLY KXPOBHTM 



THE NEW HOME OF 

BUSCH & WINZElBERG CO. 
Theatrical 
Costumes 

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Maximum of quality and minimum of 
price. The largest and most success- 
full producers are our references. 

Special attention paid to Acta as 

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Consult os be/era placing roar 



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C L I F» 1=» E R 

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CHEWING CUM— BALL— CANDY COATED 

Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bids.. 
Toledo. O. 

LAWYERS, 
F. L. Boyd, Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St., 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St.. Chicago, HL 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 
Chas. L. Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tattle, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 

SCI^sELsL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

381-583-585 South High St., Columbus. O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wm. W. Delaney. 117 Park Row. New York. 

STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS, LAMPS 

(Boueht, Sold) 

Newton Art Works, 305 W. 15th St, New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C. Goss Co.. 10 Atwater St.. Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co., 47 Eliot St.. Boston, 

'"THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 

E. Walker. 309 W. 39th St.. New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton, 455 W. 33d St., N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FICURES. 
Ben Hobson. 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 

JOHN A. WALSH 

Writer of the Cleverest in Vaudeville, Songs, 
Sketches, Monologs, Patter. Wills Point, Texas. 




»SKC 



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IIS V. U th ft. . *. T. 




WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS, ETC 

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lie N. Ninth St_ PauaedwtpwJe 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Dres*, Taxedo ••- Prince Albert Sails 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St., CMca«o 

MUSIC ARRANGED 

PIANO, ORCHESTRA. Melodies written to 
song poems. W. H. NELSON, As tor Theatre 
BIdg.. 1531 Broadway, N. Y. 

WIGS, TOUPEES, GREASE, 
PAINT, ETC 

Send for Price List 
C SHINDHELM, Mi Wast ePtk St, W. Y. 

IMFORTANT^-EVERETT J. EVANS, Oesa- 

poser- Arranger, makes a specialty of writing 
music (or new authors, and assists publication. 
Send your poems or complete songs. Estab. 
1900. Suite 505. Aster Theatre BIdg., 45th and 
Broadway, N. Y. 

Hmsao Hah-. Met. Dates, Jet. Tea. 



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lilllli 



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MR. MARTIN BECK 




NSS SARAH 




IN 





PLAYING EIGHT MORE WEEKS IN THE MIDDLE WEST 

FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE SEASON. BOOKED SOLID 

1917-18 ON THE UNITED AND ORPHEUM CIRCUITS 



MANY THANKS TO the OFFICERS and STAFF of the UNITED and ORPHEUM 
CIRCUITS for the MOST WONDERFUL SEASON EVER EXPERIENCED 




K5k NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA f 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 



HARRY VON TILZER'S 

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HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 

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Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
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NEW YORK, APRIL 25, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-No. 12 
Price. Ten Cents 



RATS LEAVE 

CLUB HOUSE 

TODAY 

ANNOUNCEMENT MADE MONDAY 

The White Rats will vacate their club- 
house today. 

On Monday it was announced to the 
members that this morning everyone 
would have to leave the premises, even 
those who have been living there for 
years, and that the clubhouse would be 
turned over to its new owners. 

No information further than this was 
forthcoming from Harry Mountford, W. J. 
FitzPatrick, International President of 
the White Bats, or other officials of the 
club.. It was stated that the general 
wind-up of affairs would be stated at a 
closed meeting: for members only, which 
was held last night at midnight. Mount- 
ford and other officials have been evading 
reporters for the past few days and no 
information . was ascertainable as to the 
occurrences at last night's meeting. 

Since the announcement of the calling 
off of the strike -against the Vaudeville 
Managers Protective Association, White 
Rats members have been in a quandary as 
to .the future of the organization and the 
maintenance of the club house. Rumors 
were current that certain creditors, which 
included . the Columbia Trust Co. with 
a mortgage of $126,000 upon the build- 
ing and Jacob J. Lubel, with a chattel 
mortagage of $5,000 on the - furnishings 
of the clubhouse, would take action to- 
ward collecting the amounts due them by 
declaring the loans defaulted. 

The Lubel loan was payable on last 
Thursday and upon, that day neither 
Mountford, who had executed the chattel 
mortgage,' or any other members of the 
organization called upon Frederick Zorn, 
attorney .for Lubel. .The next morning, 
however, Zorn was communicated with 
and informed that if he would give the 
Rats until Saturday at noon the amount 
would be forthcoming. 

Shortly before noon on that day Mount- 
ford appeared at Zom'a office with a 
check issued by a bank cashier for the 
amount to satisfy the mortgage. Mr. 
Zorn, who previously had stated that 
other than civil action would be' taken if 
the money was not forthcoming at that 
time, said that he was entirely satisfied 
with the outcome of the matter. 

When efforts were made to ascertain 
the source from which Mountford had 
raised the money nobody seemed able to 
tell how it had been Obtained. A mem- 
ber of the International Board of Direc- 
tors of the Rats stated that he had no 
idea where : the money had been raised, 
but that he was quite positive that it 
must have come from some outside source 
as they had not sufficient funds in the 
treasury of the organization to pay off 
the debt ' 

With the clearance of the debt to Lubel 
the next matter that was brought to the 
attention of the members was the matter 
of disposing of the clubhouse, as it was 
found impossible for the organization to 
maintain the establishment. At various 
times during the week rumors were cor- 
( Continued on pops 4.) 



ACTS QUARREL OVER GAG 

Some time ago Emma Carus and Larry 
Comer, and Dooley and Sales, appeared on 
the same bill at the Orpheum Theatre, 
Brooklyn, and it was found that both acts 
were using the same gag. When a dis- 
agreement arose Miss Carus showed a re- 
ceipt from James Madison, whereby she 
claimed ownership of the gag by paying 
Madison for the material. Both acts got 
together, and it was mutually agreed that, 
thereafter, when both acts appeared on the 
same bill, the act that was on the earliest 
bad the right to use it. 

While playing in Washington last week 
J. Francis Dooley had the gag copyrighted. 
This week both acts are on the bill at the 
Alhambra Theatre, and the same argument 
started. It seems that Emma Carus was 
on early Monday, and, by right of the 
agreement with Dooley she insisted upon 
using the gag. But Dooley, holding the 
copyright, was in a position to claim an 
infringement and, from reports, threatens 
Co go through with it. What the outcome 
of the controversy will be is problematical, 
bat at the Monday matinee show both acts 
used the gag and the audience was the 
only one that wondered. 



MEMPHIS MANAGERS COMBINE 

Memphis, Tenn., April 23. — The man- 
agers of this dry have formed the Mem- 
phis Theatrical Managers' Association for 
the purpose of mutual protection and co- 
operation. Arthur Lane, Orpheum, is pres- 
ident; C. A. McElroy, Majestic, vice-presi- 
dent; M. J. Vosee, secretary and treas- 
urer. The board of directors includes E. 
A. Schiller, chairman ; Frank Gray, Fred 
G. Wcia, O. F. Bridges, R. E. Carlton, M. 
Frank and Frank Trimble. 



GARDEN STAGE HAND DEAD 

John Shea, a stage hand at the Winter 
Garden, was found dead in bed last Sun. 
day night in his home in this city. He 
Was fifty-eight years of age and had 
worked in New York theatres for nearly 
forty ' years. Two" sons survive; The 
funeral will be held today under the aus- 
pices of the I. A. T. S. E. Local No. 1. 



PAULINE'S WIFE HAS RELAPSE 

Los Angeles. Cal, April 22. — Pauline 
was out of the Pantages' bill here for 
three days, owing to his wife suffering a 
relapse from an operation performed' the 
week previous in a local hospital: She is 
now much improved and Pauline has re- 
joined his company at Salt Lake City. 



NATE LEIPZIG IN "FROLIC" 
Nate Leipzig, the card manipulator, has 
signed a three-year contract with Flo 
Ziegfeld and started an engagement on the 
New Amsterdam Roof last night. His 
stunt will be to pass around to the different 
tables of the "Midnight Frolic" performing 
tricks at each. 



A FORTUNE FOR DOLLY TWINS 

By the terms of the will of the late 
James B. (Diamond Jim) Brady, the Dolly 
twin sisters, wives of. Jean Schwartz, the 
songwriter, and Harry Fox, the actor, 
respectively, are left, in addition to valu- 
able jewels, a bequest of $150,000. 



FAY TEMPLETON, ILL, CANCELS 

PerrsBiTBOH; Pa.. April- 21.— ITraesn 
caused Fay Templeton to cancel her vaude- 
ville engagements for this season several 
weeks ago. She is now on the road to 
recovery In a local hospital. 



"SPECS" PLAN 

TICKET 

WAR 

COMPANIES AFTER LE BLANC 



If plans being formulated now are car- 
ried out next season there will be a merry 
war between theatre ticket agencies along 
Broadway with the cut-rate forces on one 
side, and the so-called premium agencies on 
the other. 

According to reports, friction between 
the two interests baa been brought about 
through Joe LeBlang, the cut-rate ticket 
agent, becoming interested in the Levy- 
Jones ticket agency recently established in 
West Forty-second Street. This agency 
has been cutting into the business of both 
the Tyson and McBride premium agencies 
and the interests behind the bitter con- 
cerns have resented such trespassing into 
their field of operation. So they have re- 
solved to establish a new concern, which 
is to commence operation in the early Fall, 
to deal in cut-rate tickets, exclusively, in 
opposition to LeBlang*s different offices. 

LeBlang has been in the cut-rate busi- 
ness for more than ten years and dur- 
ing that time has built up a lucrative 
clientele, disposing of several thousand 
tickets for Broadway attractions each day 
at "cut rates." The premium people did 
not resent this manner of disposing of 
tickets. 

However, when it became known to the 
premium interests that LeBlang was con- 
nected with the Devy-Jones agency, they 
immediately felt that he was getting out 
of his field, and, as long as he was doing 
so, they would get into hi*. 
■ Accordingly arrangements will be made 
next Fall for a new agency, which is to be 
established in the Times Square district, 
to obtain tickets on the same basis as 
LeBlang does. It will mean the outlay of 
considerable capital, as in a great many 
instances LeBlang has purchased at one 
time from $15,000 to $25,000* worth of 
tickets for current productions. 

It was only through this mode of opera- 
tion that he was able to gain a foothold 
in this field. In some instances he bag 
supplied producers with cash, in advance 
of the opening of their production, in lieu 
of which he was to obtain tickets for the 
production from the time of its Initial 
presentation until the conclusion of its en- 
gagement. 

In addition to these tickets, LeBlang has 
been purchasing from the premium agen- 
cies all the tickets which they were un- 
able to dispose of after seven or seven- 
thirty each evening. These tickets he ob- 
tained at about half the box office price 
and sold them at a small increase, giving 
patrons choice seats at less than the box- 
office rate. 

With the establishment of the new 
agency it is likely that LeBlang will no 
longer receive the "left-overs" from the 
various agencies and that these tickets will 
be handled by the new agency. 

It is mid that there is sufficient capital 
hack of the new agency to allow It to com- 
pete with LeBlang in the purchase of 
Modes of tickets for productions. 



BELL WATCHING PALAIS ROYAL 

Commissioner of Licenses (ieorgc H. 
Bell has ordered attaches of his i.llice to 
visit the Palais Royal and make a detailed 
report of the type of performance given 
there. Should the inspectors report that 
the revue given is a theatrical perform- 
ance and that direct admission is charged. 
Commissioner Bell will call upon the man- 
agement to take out a theatrical license 
for the operation of the establishment. In 
this case be will also insist that they com- 
ply with all the statutory regulations de- 
manded by the various city departments 
under whose supervision the place comes, 
before issuing a license. 



ACTRESS FALLS FROM AIRSHIP 
Long Beach, Cal., April 19. — Kathleen 
Clifford is confined to her bed suffering 
from injuries received while making a 
flight in an aeroplane. Miss Clifford has 
been acting in the film serial, "The Twisted 
Thread" for the Balboa Company, and it 
was while playing a scene that took her 
into the air that she was injured. She 
was hurled to the ground from a con- 
siderable height and sustained a broken 
wrist, a broken elbow and various cuts and 
bruises. 



CREOLE ACTRESS SUES HIP 

Chicago, April 23. — Anita Bush, the 
Creole ingenue now appearing at the 
Grand Theatre, has filed suit for $5,000 
against the Hippodrome Amusement Co.. 
of New York, for injuries sustained when 
a stage hand dropped wings which pinned 
her to the floor. The accident occurred 
over a year ago, but it is just coming up 
for court action. 



INTERNAT-L AFTER THE LIBERTY 

The International Circuit has decided to 
try out the Liberty Theatre, East New 
York, before giving it a franchise by play- 
ing several attractions at the boose this 
season. It is likely that "Peg o' My 
Heart," will be tbe opening attraction, 
beginning next Monday. Two of the Gus 
Hill shows will follow this attraction. 



DUFFY AND LORENZE SPLIT 

Jimmy Duffy and Mercedes Lorenze, 
who have been stage partners for more 
than five years, have now come to a 
severing of the ways. Mr. Duffy will 
hereafter do a single act, but Miss Lo- 
renze has, as yet, not made any definite 
plans for the futnre. 



WORLAND WITH BEN WAY 

Roanoke, Va., April 23. — Happy Ben- 
way and Company, presenting the Twen- 
tieth Century Minstrels, open at Keith's 
here on April SO, which starts their tour 
over the D. B. O. circuit. John Worland, 
late of Al G. Field's minstrels, has been 
added to the act. 



RAE SELWYN AT FRENCH LICK 
French Lick, Ind., April 21. — Rae 
Selwyn-Bryan, Sister of Archie and Edgar 
Selwyn, has arrived here, with her 
daughter, for a stay of several weeks. 



SAUNDERS TO JOIN RESERVES 

Earl Saunders, connected with the 
United Booking Offices, has applied for a 
commission in the Reserve Corps of the 
United State Army. 



BESSIE HILL AT LEVY'S 

Lob Airanzs, Cal.. April 24. — Bessie 
Hill has replaced Ethel Davis at Levy's. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 



BELASCO-WOODS 

TESTIMONY 

ALLjN 

DECISION EXPECTED SHORTLY 



Tfae conclusion of the taking of testi- 
mony in the action brought by A. H. 
Woods against David Belasco and Willard 
Mack, to obtain an injunction against the 
former's production of "The Tiger Rose," 
was held on Monday. Counsel for both 
sides took up the better part of the day 
arguing important questions. 

The first point taken up was as to 
whether or not the contract was valid and 
enforcable. Irving Dittenhofer, attorney 
for Belasco, declared it was inequitable 
because there was no specific amount in- 
volved. On the other hand, Louis Vorhaus 
contended for Woods, that, under the con- 
tract, Woods could not hold up the pro- 
duction of a play for more than one year, 
as there were provisions whereby, at the 
end of that time, it would have to be 
returned to Mack to do with as he deemed 
best. 

The second point argued was whether 
the contract could be enforced by an in- 
junction, or whether only limited money 
damages could be demanded. Vorhaus 
contended that his client could not meas- 
ure the damage in monetary value prior 
to the production of the play. Ditten- 
hoefer stated that there was no way of 
forcing Mack to comply with the contract 
and that the only remedy would be 
monetary damage. 

The third point was whether the con- 
tract was abrogated by Mack in July, 
1010, when he had a conversation with 
Woods. The plaintiff claimed that, as 
the contract was made in writing it could 
only be invalidated in the same manner 
and not verbally. 

The next question argued was whether 
Belasco helped to violate the contract by 
collaborating with Mack in the writing 
of a play, after receiving notice from 
Woods that he had a contract with Mack. 

Dittenhoefer said that, assuming this 
violation to be true, what relief could be 
given the Woods. And under these con- 
ditions, how would the court rule regard- 
ing the separation of the material on 
which Mack and Belasco collaborated, 
with respect to that which Mack had 
furnished. 

Another question to be taken up, was 
the amount of damages that Woods would 
be entitled to in case the Court should 
decide in his favor. The show was re- 
cently produced and taken off for produc- 
tion at a later date. 

Judge Lacombe, who is acting as referee, 
will render his findings, which will be 
final, to Justice Pendleton in the Supreme 
Court next week. 

SUNSET INN TO BE Y. M. C. A. 
Sahta Monica. Cal, April 23. — Per- 
formers who have enjoyed many festive 
gatherings at Baron Long's Sunset Inn 
will have to seek such pleasure elsewhere 
in the future, for the resort loses ita liquor 
license at the end of this month. It is 
rumored that the inn will be converted 
into a Y. M. C. A. Despite the fight that 
Long and many of his friends have put up. 
the Santa Monica authorities, who are 
trying to make the county dry, seem to 
have won. Sunset Inn has long been con- 
sidered one of the attractions of Southern 
California. 



SPLIT WEEKS FN MEMPHIS 

Memphis, Tenn., April 22. — Beginning 
today the entire bill at Loew*s Lyceum 
Theatre will be changed twice a week for 
the Summer season, as this theatre remains 
open all summer. The Lyric has closed its 
doors for the season. 

JAKE ROSENTHAL'S MOTHER DIES 

Dubuque, Iowa, April 1<J. — Mrs. Rose 
Rosenthal, mother of Jake Rosenthal, 
manager of the Majestic Theatre, here, 
died last week at her home in Chicago. 



HACKETT AND CORT DISAGREE 

According to rumors current on Broad- 
way, the conditions which led up to the 
closing of "Johnny, Get Tour Gun" at the 
Criterion Theatre on Saturday night were 
not attended by any undue demonstration 

of love between James K. Hackett and 
John Cort. 

The production, which was playing to 
practically capacity bouses and which gave 
promise of running throughout the sum- 
mer, closed very suddenly, due, it is said, 
to a disagreement between Cort and Hack- 
ett as to the division of profits and a dis- 
position on the part of Hackett to leave 
things as they were. 

The show was put into the Criterion on 
a guarantee basis, but Cort soon found 
that, although the piece was a money- 
maker for Hackett, at best it was a loser 
for him. It is stated that he thereupon 
applied to Hackett to arrange what he 
considered a more equitable split of profits, 
and demanded a fifty-fifty break, to which 
Hackett refused to accede. 

It is said that Cort also resented the 
fact that Hackett's efforts at musical com- 
position were Bsed, and objected to the or- 
chestra playing so much of Hackett's music 
between the acts of the farce. 

When Cort found that he could come to 
no understanding with Hackett which 
would enable him to make money on his 
play, he decided to withdraw the farce im- 
mediately. 

After playing the subway circuit, 
"Johnny, Get Your Gun" will rest until 
next season, when it will be reorganized 
and take to the road. 



FARRAR SELLS BELONGINGS 

Art treasures, oil paintings, statuary, 
tapestries, carpets and all sorts of curios, 
which were formerly the property of Mrs. 
Lou Tellegen, known on the stage as 
Geraldine Farrar, are now being auctioned 
off at the Broadway Art Galleries. The 
goods are said to be worth more than 
$200,000. The actress' removal from a 
big home to an apartment necessitated the 
sale. Some of the property has been ex- 
hibited at the Metropolitan Museum. 



FINED FOR THEATRE ROW 

Elijah Payn of Chatham, N. Y., a son of 
Lou Payn, a political leader, was fined $25 
after being convicted of assault in Special 
Sessions last Monday. He was charged 
with assaulting E. H. Browning, an in- 
vestment broker, in the Hudson Theatre 
last October. Browning has also insti- 
tuted a civil action against Payn to re- 
cover $75,000 for assault 



ED. VINTON DEAD 

Detroit, Mich., April 25. — Ed Vinton, 
who did a vaudeville turn with a dog, 
known as "Ed Vinton and Buster," dropped 
dead on the stage of a theatre here last 
night. He is survived by a widow and 
daughter. 



DAN HENNESSY RECUPERATING 

San Diego. CaL, April 23. — Dan Hen- 
nessy is recuperating here after a serious 
siege of nervous trouble. His wife has 
jnst undergone an operation on her eye, 
but is also much better. 




UNIONS PLAN 

MOSS BREAK 

THISJITEEK 

DEMAND FULL RECOGNITION 



The endeavors of the Theatrical Federa- 
tion of Greater New York to come to an 
arrangement with B. S. Moss regarding 
the employment of stage hands and 
musicians affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor in his circuit of 
theatres have proved futile, it has been 
learned, and the matter has been turned 
over to the International Alliance of 
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion 
Picture Operators of the United States 
and Canada for action. 

It is learned that the Alliance offices 
this week will send notices to the various 
locals throughout the United States and 
Canada, prohibiting the operators con- 
nected with the organization from pro- 
jecting any of the pictures manufactured 
or distributed by B. S. Moss. 

For a violation of this order, members 
of the local will be subject to either sus- 
pension or expulsion from the Alliance. 

This order will go into effect May 1, 
and is the result of the failure to get 
Moss to in any way recognize the Union 
and the outcome of a resolution passed at 
the International convention in Cleveland 
two months ago. At that time, Moss was 
to have sixty days in which to meet the 
demands of the labor organization. 

Another concern which operates a 
vaudeville circuit and produces motion pic- 
tures was also given the same notice. 
The head of this concern has been away 
from New York for some time and it is 
said that on his return this week he will 
go into consultation with the union of- 
ficials regarding the matter. This con- 
cern distributes a program of fifty-two 
releases, besides several specials each year. 



DEFENDS THE STAGE 

Horneix, N. Y., April 21. — The the- 
atre came in for some hard raps by a 
local evangelist here, but E. D. (Tex) 
Perry, a theatrical man of these parts, 
has answered with a forceful defense of 
the profession and a controversy is on in 
the local paper. The evangelist said that 
the drama had been commercialized, that 
the play mocks religion and that the the- 
atre cannot be an educational institution, 
«s most actors have no education. Perry's 
virility in answering these charges and the 
proofs he brought to bear have dispelled 
the attacks as unfounded and unjust. 



RECRUITING AT THE RIVERSIDE 

Fugene Perry, of the Riverside Theatre, 
claims to be the first B. F. Keith man. 
ager to start a recruiting agency. In the 
lobby of the theatre is a tent in charge 
of an officer with twelve ushers represent- 
ing the house. The hours of enlistment 
are from 9 to 1 daily, and the results for 
the first day numbered seventeen. 



"HER UNBORN CHLD" IN FRISCO 

San Francisco, April 23.— tJazzolo, 
Gotts & Clifford's success. "Her Unborn 
Child," will open next Saturday at the 
Savoy Theatre, here, with a special com- 
pany organized in this city. This will 
make the sixth company presenting this 
play in various parts of the country. 



ALLARDT HAS NERVOUS ATTACK 

West Baden, Ind., April 21. — O. J. 
Allardt. manager of the Orpheum, at 
South Bend, this State, is here suffering 
from a severe nervous attack. "Hank" 
Allardt. his brother, is managing the South 
Bend house for the time being. 



ALVLN (RUBE) GREEN 

who portrays the Real Yank with the Bsrnum 
and Bailey Show this season as a special fea- 
ture, is well known for this class of work at 
the parks and fairs. 



NEW ACT ON COAST 

Sait Francisoo. CaL. April 22. — Beat- 
rice Thome, who has been playing East- 
ern vaudeville for some time, has returned 
to her home here and is scheduled to open 
at the Hippodrome In a sketch by Walter 
Montague. 



HISTORIC THEATRE BURNED 

Saginaw, Mich., April 18. — The 
Academy of Music, Saginaw's oldest and 
best known theatre, was destroyed by fire 
which started a little before 10 o'clock 
last night and raged for two hours before 
it was under control. The estimated loss 
is $35,000 which is offset to the extent of 
$20,000 insurance. 

The house was one of the historic thea- 
tres of the State and, upon its stage in 
its early days appeared many players who 
have since risen to fame. It was erected 
in 1884, and was dedicated December 26 
of that year by Madame Janisch in 
"Leonore." This event was followed by 
the appearance of contemporary stars in- 
cluding Sarah Bernhardt, Mme. Janauschek, 
Ellen Terry, Julia Marlowe, Mme. Mod- 
jeska, Ada Rehan, Minnie Maddern Fiske 
(now known as Mrs. Fiske) Ethel Barry- 
more, Edwin Booth, Joseph Jefferson, 
Lawrence Barrett, John McCullough, 
Tomaso Salvini, E. H. Sothern, and many 
other stage luminaries who came to 
Saginaw in the height of their careers, for 
in those days the Academy here ranked 
with the best of theatres and was virtually 
responsible for putting this city on the 
theatrical map. 

Clay Buckley was the first manager of 
the house, Sam Clay followed and then 
came John H. Davidson, each of whom in 
his day ranked with the best known man- 
agers in the country. The present man- 
ager is Fred E. Button, and the property 
is owned by the National Amusement Co. 
of which E. D. Stair is the head. 



COHAN HOUSE FOR HITCHCOCK 

Raymond Hitchcock in his new musical 
comedy, "Hitchy-Koo," will begin his New 
York engagement at the C. & H. Theatre 
on Jnne 4. It was originally intended 
to bring the show into the Globe Theatre 
for a summer run, but as Laurette. Taylor 
has been doing big business in this' house, 
Chas. B. Dillingham will have her con- 
tinue her engagement there until the end 
of June. The Hitchcock show is out on 
the one-night stands being whipped into 
shape. 



"JANICE MEREDITH" FOR VAUDE 

Stuart Sage has completed a condensed 
version of "Janice Meredith" which will 
be put into rehearsal next week prepara- 
tory to a tour of the vaudeville theatres. 
The playlet, which will run thirty 
minutes, has twenty-four characters. 



ALTOONA COLONIAL OPENS 

Altoona, Pa., April 23. — The Colonial 
Theatre has opened here. The house was 
built at a cost of $40,000, and is said to 
be modern in every particular. R. N. Le 
Fever, of Cincinnati, is its manager. 

RATS LEAVE CLUB TODAY 

(Continued from page 8.) 

rent along Broadway that the property 
had been sold and the names of several 
people were mentioned as the purchasers. 
However, no verification of the statements 
could be obtained. 

On Monday, it was said, that the build- 
ing, which was erected on ground leased 
for a long term of years, had been sold 
to A. Luchow, the restaurant man, of 
Fourteenth street, for a sum said to he 
in excess of the mortgages and taxes due 
on the premises, in addition to a sufficient 
sum to cover the outstanding bond debts 
to members of the organization. It was 
said that Luchow was represented by a 
broker in the deal and that he did not 
appear in the transaction at all. 

All of the office help of the organization 
were discharged last week and the only 
ones about the offices were officers of the 
organization. 

On Monday afternoon a good quantity 
of the furniture of the club was removed 
from the building. All of the books and 
other property of the organization have 
been placed in packing cases and will be 
taken away today. 

It is said that the organization will no 
longer maintain clubrooms but that 
Mountford will have all office in one of 
the buildings in the theatrical district 

from which" he will conduct the affairs 
of the organization. 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



ACTOR SENTENCED TO 35 

YEARS FOR ATT ACKING GIRL 

Fred Lloyd, Vaudevillian, Faints in Court as Jury Renders 

Verdict That Saved Him from Death Penalty 

—Victim Had Been "Protege" 



Fort WOBXH, Texas, April 20. — Con- 
victed of having attacked a twelve-year- 
old girl, Fred Lloyd, a vaudeville actor, 
was sentenced to thirty-five years in 
States prison here last week. Under the 
statutes of this State he could have been 
executed for the crime of which he was 
convicted. 

Lloyd has a wife, Lucille Cramer, & 
member of the "Fired from Yale" com- 
pany. He collapsed in jail when she called 
to see him. 

Lloyd was arrested some time ago when 
the mother of the girl appealed to proba- 
tion officers in behalf of her daughter. 
She said that she and her daughter met 
Lloyd when he was playing in a vaude- 
ville theatre here, and that he instantly 
took a fancy to the girl, who dances 
cleverly and sings well for her age. He 
told, them, she said, that the child was 
destined to become a great artist and 
that she "would have the world at her 
feet" if they allowed him to be a "big 
brother" to her and look after her in- 
tereats. 

The mother consented, she said, and 
shortly after her daughter appeared with 
Lloyd in Oklahoma and Texas theatres, 
and continued to do bo until the charge 



that resulted in his arrest was made. 

Following the verdict, attorneys for the 
defense said that they "would immediately 
file an amended petition. 

"It might as well have been for life." 

This exclamation fell from the lips of 
Lloyd soon after the verdict was read. 
By it he was visibly disappointed, having 
entertained hopes for a much lighter sen- 
tence, if not for acquittal. 

The State had made a strong fight for 
the death penalty, and speculation that 
the jury would bring in that penalty was 
generally dealt in. In his speech for the 
State, Assistant County Attorney Will 
Parker made one of the strongest pleas 
for the death penalty that had been heard 
in the courts for some time. Parker de- 
clared that it was the worst case that 
had ever been tried in Tarrant County. 
Phillips also made a strong plea for the 
extreme penalty. 

Six ballots were necessary for a final 
verdict, it was Btated after the jury was 
excused. On the first ballot the jury 
stood two for death penalty, eight for 
life imprisonment, two for twenty years 
and one for five years. For the first sev- 
eral ballots votes were, cast for the death 
penalty. 



PUBLISHERS TO PLAY ACTORS 
There's going to be a real game of ball 
up at the Old Bronx Oval One Hundred 
and Sixty-third Street and Southern 
Boulevard, next Sunday when a team 
representing several music publishers will 
try to put it over one composed of actors. 
In the line-up for the melody makers will 
be Maurice Bitter, from Shapiro's, Moe 
Schenck, from the Loew Booking offices, 
Sammy Smith, Bernie Grossman and 
Arthur Piantadosi. 



"MOLLY" STARTS SECOND TOUR 

New Haven, Conn., April 24. — "Molly 
Make-Believe" opened its second tour here 
last night. In the company are Karl 
Brown, Vivian Wessell, Grace Carlyle, 
Ethel St. Clair, Wallace Erskine, Fred 
Timble, Helen Tracey, Katherine Comegys 
and Kenneth Keith. 



SPAHN HAS WHITE RAT SHOW 

Joliet, I1L, April 22.— J. Leslie Spahn's 
road show opens here today at the Gayety. 
It ia understood to be a survival of the 
White RatB road show idea, inasmuch as 
Cora Youngblood Corson and her girls are 
featured, but it ia no longer advertised in 
this way. The next stop will be Aurora, 
April 24. 



WAR CLOSES SHOW 

Auburn, Ind., April 23. — War caused 
the closing of the No. 2 road company of 
"Hit-tbe-Trail Holliday." Its last stand 
was at the new Court Theatre here Satur- 
day night. The company left for New 
York. 



BURLINGTON HOUSE REOPENS 

Burlington, la., April 31. — The re- 
modeled Jewel Theatre opened Thursday 
under the direction of Stone and Campbell. 



STONE MAY SELECT MOORE 

Reports along Broadway are that Frank 
Moore, now appearing in a vaudeville act 
with his sister, Florence, is being con- 
sidered aa a possible successor to Dave 
Montgomery, with Fred Stone, in Dilling- 
ham productions. Moore played with Stone 
in the "Wizard of Ob." No one has been 
decided upon as yet. 

MACON THEATRES CHANGE OWNER 

Macon, Ga., April 20. — The owners of 
the Capitol have secured control of the 
Palace and Princess, and It. H. DeBruler, 
who is manager of the Capitol, has been 
made general manager of the Palace and 
Princess as well. 



MAUDE TO SAIL TO AUSTRALIA 

Cyril Maude and company will sail for 
Australia May 15 to appear in "Grumpy" 
and "The Great Lover." 



"BEAUTIFUL UNKNOWN" CLOSES 

Boston, April 23. — "The Beautiful Un- 
known" ended its tour Saturday at the 
Majestic Theatre. 



CAMP AN INI LEASES LEXINGTON 

Campaninfs Chicago Opera Company, 

which has decided to invade New York for 

.a season of four weeks of grand opera, 

will appear at the Lexington Opera House. 

which they have leased for an entire year. 



TO PRODUCE "THE JURY" 

"The Jury," by Edward Peple, will be 
produced in June by Edward McGregor. 
The cast requires nineteen women, all said 
to play important characters and nine men. 



WILL DEMINC IN TOWN 

i Will Deming arrived in New York Satur- 
day from Jackson, O., and will remain a 
few weeks before returning. 





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RIALTO CELEBRATING BIRTHDAY 

The Rialto Theatre ia celebrating its 
first anniversary this week. The house 
has been redecorated for the occasion and 
new scenery and lighting effects have 
been installed. The anniversary attrac- 
tion ia Douglas Fairbanks in the first 
Artcraft release "In Again, Out Again." 
A descriptive booklet of the history of 
the theatre compiled by Hamish McLaurin 
is being distributed to each patron, aa a 
souvenir of the occasion. 



SUNDAY OPENING FOR ROCKFORD 

Rockfobd, 111., April 23. — At the city 
election here last week "Sunday opening" 
swept the city by a decisive majority. The 
churches fought their campaign with lib- 
eral advertising and personal house to 
house canvas against the permitting of the 
"movie" houses to remain open Sunday af- 
ternoons and evenings, and the result ia a 
great victory for the "movie" houses. 



T. M. A. BENEFIT MAY 9 

The annual benefit performance of the 
Brooklyn Lodge No. 30, Theatrical Me- 
chanical Association, has been scheduled 
for Wednesday evening, May 0, at the 
Brooklyn Academy of Music. Frederick 
Warde, Shakespearean actor, Nella Brown, 
formerly contralto with the Calburn Opera 
Co., and Claire M. Gillespie, lyric soprano, 
are announced for the program. 

BERNHARDTS CONDITION SERIOUS 

After Sarah Bernhardt had suffered a 
relapse at Mount Sinai Hospital laat 
Saturday Dr. Emanuel Liebman decided 
that he may have to issue a call for volun- 
teers to give their blood in transfusion in 
an effort to save the life of the acres*. 
Mme. Bernhardt has been at the hospital 
for more than a week during which time 
she was operated upon. 



BLOMBERG SELLS THEATRE 

Ashyille, N. C, April 24. — L. Blom- 
berg has disposed of his Strand Theatre 
here to the Strand Amusement Company, 
the purchase being made by W. H. Lessa- 
ter, acting aa agent for the corporation. 
It will continue its present policy of 
moving pictures. 



WOODS TAKES VAUDE. FLIER 

A. H. Woods ia going to take a flier in 
vaudeville by producing Max Marcin's 
playlet, "The Purple Vial," featuring Mile. 
Gabrielle Dorziat. The playlet will be 
routed through the United Booking Offices, 
and will have its premiere shortly. 

FRED NORDSTROM RECOVERING 

Elgin, 111., April 23. — Fred Nordstrom, 
of "The Birth of a Nation" Company, waa 
recently operated on for appendicitis at a 
hospital here, is getting along nicely and 
will soon be able to join the company. 



"THE COUNTRY COUSIN" OPENS 

Philadelphia, Pa., April 23. — "The 
Country Cousin," by Booth Tarkington and 
Julian Street, bad a successful premiere 
to-night at the Broad Street Theatre. 
Tarkington attended the opening. 



"KEY AND ABEY" CLOSES 

Sunbdkt, Pa., April 21. — George H. 
Bnbb will close the season of "Ikey and 
Abey" company here next Saturday. Two 
companies will be sent out next season, 
both playing in the West. 



ROCHESTER MANAGER VISITS N. Y. 

Rochester, N. Y., April 23. — Manager 
Ten Broek, of the Grand Theatre, spent 
the greater part of last week in New York 
City booking features for bis house. 



CAWTHORN AFTER TARPON 

Joseph Cawthorn leaves the city next 
Saturday to join Jacob Wertheim on his 
houseboat near Miami, Fla. They will 
spend a month tarpon fishing. 



BEATRICE LAMBERT 



MISS HAYDEN LOSES l«OTHER 

Watertown, Mass., April 20. — Mrs. Jo- 
hanna Franz, mother of Virginia Hayden, 
the girl baritone, died here after a long 
illness. 



AMETA 

The attractive picture adorning the 
front cover of this issue of The Cutfeb 
is Ameta, appearing this week at the Al- 
hambra Theatre. Miss Ameta is an 
American born girl who studied the art of 
terpischore abroad, and is employing vari- 
ous mirror effects and lighting Implements 
to illuminate her knowledge of m B y-W a 
highly interesting and winning vaudeville 
offering, The act is one of tie prettiest 
combinations of color and dazzling effects 
in the realm of the two-a-day. The act 
baa appeared in every city in Europe, and 
has been received with the same enthusi- 
astic acclaim aa in New York. 

H. B. Marinelli is the booking manager 
of Ameta. 



CHANGES MADE IN BILLS 
John and Mae Burke did not open at 
the Fifth Avenue Theatre aa billed this 
week on account of a severe cold contracted 
by John Burke. Julia Curtis substituted. 
At the Riverside, "The Dancing Girl of 
Delhi" was billed, but waa replaced by the 
Five Nelsons and Leo Beers, who was 
originally billed, waa replaced by .Will 
Ward and Girls, who are billed to play 
at the Fifth Avenue Theatre the laat half 
of the week, but will not be able to do so. 
Naiano replaced Alexander MacFadyn at 
the Royal Theatre. MacFadyn could not 
play on account of illness. 



TREASURERS' BENEFIT MAY 6 

The 28th annual benefit performance for 
the Relief Fund of the Treasurers* Club 
of America, will be held in the Hudson 
Theatre on Sunday, May 6. The enter- 
tainment will be supplied by volunteers 
from the various showa and vaudeville 
theatres in the city. Twenty-five acta are 
to appear. The entertainment will be un- 
der the direction of AL Darling, manager 
of the Colonial Theatre. 



QUEEN IE VASSAR A GRANDMA 

Mrs. Joseph Cawthorn, formerly known 
to the stage aa Queenie Vassar, is now 
the grandmother of a bouncing boy, which 
the stork recently brought to the noma of 
her son, Harry Kernel]. Mrs. Cawthorn's 
first husband waa the late Harry Kernel], 
the famous Irish comedian. The new boy 
arrived on the birthday anniversary of 
Joseph Cawthorn who is, consequently, 
doubly proud of the event. 

CUMBERLAND HAILS HOBART 
Cumberland, Md., April 21. — George V. 
Hobart, author of "Experience," returned 
to Cumberland after an absence of twenty- 
three years, and was accorded a great re- 
ception by the citizens of the community. 
The mayor made Mr. Hobart a cordial 
speech of welcome in the lobby of the ho- 
tel. 



1NA CLAIRE IN WASHINGTON 
Washington, D. C, April 23. — Miaa 
Ina Claire, the musical comedy star, ia 
being entertained at the borne of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence Townsend in this city, 
parents of Lieut. Lawrence Townsend, Jr., 
U. S. N., to whom her engagement waa 
recently announced. 



DREW GOING TO COAST 

John Drew will extend his engagement in 
"Major Pendennla," so that the attraction, 
instead of closing in the East, will con- 
clude its tour on the Pacific Coast some 
time in Jane. 



BARRISTER A LIEUTENANT 

W. W. Barrister, a theatrical publicity 
man, and former husband of Lubowaka, 
the dancer, has been accepted by the Navy 
Department as a member of the Naval 
Reserves with the rank of lieutenant. 



MRS. SUNDAY RENTS HIP 
Mrs. Billy Sunday has engaged the Hip- 
podrome for a Sunday afternoon in the 
near future when she herself will endeavor 
to persuade ainners to hit the trail. 



NEW "FROLIC" OPENS 

The premiere of the fifth edition of the 
"Midnight Frolic" occurred last night, the 
opening having been postponed from Mon- 
day. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 




MORE GIRL ACTS DEMANDED 

IN VAUD E AS RE SULT OF WAR 

Agents Think Audiences Will Resent Seeing American Men on 

Stage and Cite Present EngK-.Ii Conditions to Support 

Their Contention That Girl Acts Will Become Popular 



NAN HALPERIN NOT QUITTING 

Nan Halperin, who, according to rumor, 
had deserted vaudeville until next sea- 
son, will headline the bill at the Palace 
Theatre, Chicago, next week. She will 
then rest a month at Cedar Lake, Wis., 
after which she will return East and 
play at the Brighton and several other 
seaside houses. This will be followed by 
a six weeks' rest, and then a nine weeks' 
tour of the Orpheum Circuit. 



According to the opinion of many vaude- 
ville agents, the active participation of 
the United States in the European conflict, 
la going to be followed by a demand on 
the part of American vaudeville audiences 
for more female performers and fewer men. 
In which case vaudeville girl acts will 
quickly come into their own, the demand 
for them probably exceeding the supply- 
Many vaudeville agents believe that, girl 
acts will soon be prominently featured on 

In support of this theory, they cite Eng- 
land as an example. It is a well estab- 
lished fact, the agents argue, that with the 
outbreak of hostilities abroad, English 
audiences resented seeing able-bodied coun- 
trymen performing on the stage, with the 
result that today the bills of English 
music halls are made up, for the most part, 
of Englishwomen and American per- 
formers. 



While agents are not going so far as 
to say that this condition will soon prevail 
in the United States, many seem to believe 
in theatrical preparedness. They are, 
therefore, making efforts to organize new 
girl acts, believing that the securing of 
bookings for such acts is going to prove a 
very easy matter. 

What seems to be a step in this direction 
is the revival of the Boston Fadettes, a 
musical girl act of fifteen persons. This 
act opened last week in New York. It 
has been several years since the last ap- 
pearance of the Boston Fadettes, and it is 
rumored that their reorganization came 
about as the result of a suggestion from 
J. 3. Murdock, of the United Booking 
Offices. 

It has been stated by competent author- 
ity that other acts of a similar character 
will soon be seen in vaudeville. 



HART TO PRODUCE SHOWS 

Max Hart, the vaudeville agent, has 
formed a partnership with T. Roy Barnes 
to produce musical comedies. The piece 
for the first production has already been 
chosen and will feature Barnes. It will 
be produced in late summer or early 
autumn. Other productions by the new 
partnership are expected to follow. 

ELTENGE FOR CENTURY SHOW ■ 

Julian Eltinge has signed with Dilling- 
ham and Ziegfeld to appear at the Century 
Theatre next season, in the new revue that 
it to be staged there. Elsie Janis, Bernard 
Granville and Daphne Pollard are others 
signed for the show. 



HOWARD-CLARK REVUE OPENS 
A musical revue, featuring Joe Howard 
and Ethlyn Clark, received its premiere in 
Yonkers on Monday night It will play 
the last half of the week at Mount Vernon. 
The Aesthetic Dancers were added to the 
act as an eleventh hour attraction, but have 
only been engaged for the week. 

AITKEN. JR., ENLISTS IN NAVY 

SPBXNGFl-xn, Mass., April 23. — Jim 
Altken, Jr., son of James H. Aitken, and 
a member of the act known as the Four 
Aitkena, has enlisted in the United States 
Navy. The act will continue with three 
people. 

OLYVE EDMUNDS FOR VAUDEVILLE 

Memphis. Tenn., April 17. — Olyve Ed- 
munds, well known in the West for her 
work on the dramatic stage, is co-author, 
with James Lyne, of a sketch in which she 
will soon make her appearance in vaude- 
ville. 



RAY COX TO GO ABROAD 

After a nine weeks' tour on the Or- 
pheum Circuit, Ray Cox will return to 
England, if possible, to fulfill engage- 
ments called for in several tentative con- 
tracts v which were signed there before 
her departure for New York. 



FOUR NEW PLAYLETS SEEN 

On Sunday night at the Comedy The- 
atre, under the direction of Miss Mary 
Shaw, the Morningside Players presented 
their second bill of the season. It consisted 
of four one-act plays, written and acted by 
members of the organization. 



FILM STAR FOR PALACE 

Mary Miles Minter, moving picture star, 
may appear at the Palace Theatre in per- 
son very shortly. 



FRIEDLANDER MOVES TO N. Y. 

The offices of William B. Friedlander, 
Inc., have been moved from Chicago to 
New York. 



KENO & GREEN BREAKING EN 

Joe Keno and Rosie Green are break- 
ing in a new act entitled, "Barney and 
Rosie." 



SCHWARTZ TO GO IN VAUDE. 

Frederick Schwartz, who was musical 
director with the road company of "Prin- 
cess Pat," has returned to New York after 
a successful season and will go out with a 
vaudeville act after a few weeks' rest. 



EVANS GIVING BENEFIT 

A benefit for the Home Defense League 
will be given next Monday at the Lexing- 
ton Theatre under the direction of Prank 
Evans, vaudeville agent. Sergeant "Doc" 
Wells will be headliner on the bilL 



RANDALL REPLACES WHITE 

Lucille Cavanaugh, formerly of the team 
of Cavanaugh and White, has formed a 
new vaudeville partnership with Carl 
Randall, a former dancing partner of 
Emma Cams. 



MACFARLANE FOR VAUDEVILLE 

George MacFarlane, the baritone, fea- 
tured this season in "Miss Springtime," 
will play a few weeks over the United time 
this Bummer. 

SYNCOPATORS ON LOEW TIME 

The Three Syncopators opened on the 
Loew time Monday at Toronto, Can., with 
Erie, Pa., Chicago, Cleveland and Detroit 
to follow. 



DOUGHERTY AND LUCY IN NEW ACT 

Dougherty and Lucy will open shortly 
with a new act. Miss Lucy will be at the 
piano and Miss Dougherty is prima donna. 



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BEHMAN SHOW 
FEATURES MARTELLE 
AT COLUMBIA 

General Jack Singer brought his third 
production finally to play New York, and 
the Bebman Show, with the well-known 
impersonator, pleased a fair-sized house at 
the Columbia Monday afternoon. MarteUe 
appears in his specialty and leads several 
numbers. 

The comedy is laid along f-mill-r lines, 
much of it being in the form of kidding 
conversation between Lucille Manion, the 
leading lady, and Wilbur Dobbs, which was 
a trifle too long. 

Mr. Dobbs was a good "German" and a 
funny mayor in the military skit, which 
closed the show. 

John E. Cain was the little Irishman 
with good comedy ideas, and he also made 
good as General McSweeney. 

Miss Manion qualified as a singer in 
"Romany." 

Ameta Pynes has developed a good sing- 
ing voice, and her dances can readily be 
called excellent productions, in which she 
is capably assisted by Bert McCarthy. 
Her Hawaiian number, with the medley of 
choruses, called for many encores. 

Blanche Newcomb, besides playing her 
parts, appeared as a charming "Buster" 
in her specialty, singing "A Little Bit of 
Monkey" and "Dear Old Girl" for encores. 

Martelle's numbers were "Ceylon," "New 
Orleans," and "Splash Me," for which eight 
shapely girls flashed showy bathing suits- 
Bud Snyder offered his bicycle act, 
showing the balances and stair mounting 
at which he is an adept. Blue- Landolf 
and Johnny Snyder, his two assistants, 
kept the house laughing. 

Samuel Hyams and Jack Nichols helped 
out in minor roles. 



"U. S. BEAUTIES" ARE 
BILLED AS "CITY BELLES" 
AT THE OLYMPIC 

For the return date at the Olympic, 
New York, of this show this week. Man- 
ager Dave Guggenheim is using a different 
title. 

"Two Old Fools" is the burlesque in 
which Billy (Grogan) Spencer and Sam 
Wright play the Irish and Hebrew sports, 
out for a good time. Through the liber- 
ties taken by burlesque writers, they are 
"hiding" in full view of their wives, who 
are talking about them. 

Doris Claire, Mae Wagner, Dolly Clif- 
ford, James Horton, Joe McCoy and Sye 
Ali complete the cast. 

The big illuminated flag was used for 
the finale of the first act with good effect. 

The chorus includes Edna Pierce, Ruth 
Hemphill, Jane Chapman, Stella Gordon, 
Madge Dugan, Madge Moore, Irene Zara, 
Lucette Georgia, Lillian Healey, Bobby 
Reams, Dorothy Budd, Eleanor Luker, 
Daisy Gallagher, Theresa Arnold, Anna 
Dekoven, Louise Ador, Delia Ali, Lillie 
Smith. 



GIRL SHOW DOING WELL 
Baker, Ore., April 18. — The Boston 
Show Girl Co. is doing big business 
through Idaho, Oregon and Washington. 

The company includes : Louis B. Christ, 
manager : Jack Lefler. agent ; Billy Nixon, 
stage director: M. J. Crusoe, music di- 
rector; Morey Long, Billy Rafferty, Arline 
McDonongh, Francis Hoyle, Margaret 
Becker, Jane Worth, Anna Crawford, 
Ester For ran and Georgie Long, and car- 
ries special scenery and effects for each 
production. Week of April 29 the show 
plays the Arcade Theatre, La Grande, this 
State. 



NINA PAYNE 

Colonial Theatre. New York, Tkia Week. Direction M. S. rWntkam. 



SOUSA WENS TROPHY 

Bostow, April 20.— John Philip Souaa 
won a trophy here today in the prelimin- 
ary amateur trap-sljooting contest at the 
Riverside Traps, Back Bay. Sousa's 
score was 125 birds out of a possible 150. 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




COLONIAL 

Chiyo and Chiyo present a refined open- 
ing act entitled "A Japanese Delight," 
which is a mixture of acrobatics and 
dancing. The pair work fast and are very 
versatile. The man executes some diffi- 
cult acrobatic feats and the woman does 
some clever dancing. 

Lew Reed and the Wright Girls deserved 
a later spot on the bill, although they 
pleased in number two. They will be re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

Balph Dunbar's Tennessee Ten, in the 
third spot, stopped the show cold. These 
ten darkies are right there with plenty of 
jazz, and it seemed that this was what 
the Colonial audience was looking for. 
The earlier part of their act was a little 
bit too noisy and would be better if the 
darkies would tone down their work a 
trifle. A girl in the act sings very pleas- 
ingly. 

It was the jazz band, introduced toward 
the end of the turn, that caused the act 
to stop the show. For anyone who likes 
jazz music, this colored aggregation are in 
a class by themselves. Everyone of the 
band, including the leader, works very 
hard, but the final result warrants it. 
The settings for this turn were in splendid 
taste. 

Andy Rice, in an act by Aaron Hoffman 
entitled "In Society," was far from being 
a riot. The turn will be reviewed under 
New Acts. 

The first half of the bill was closed by 
Nina Payne. William Lavae, her trom- 
bonist, is also mentioned on the program, 
as well as Justine Millikan, the musical 
director. 

Miss Payne has conceived an act which 
is very different from other dancing acts. 
She did four "character studies," as she 
calls them. They were the Pen Picture 
Prance, Cleopatra's Cakewalk, the Danc- 
er's Dream, and the Futurist Freak, 
danced in the order named. All were done 
exceptionally well, with the music, cos- 
tuming and settings in perfect harmony. 
The Cleopatra Cakewalk was a particu- 
larly novel number and, although Miss 
Payne scores an easy success" as matters 
stand, perhaps her final success would be 
even greater if she would make this num- 
ber her closer. 

Andrew Mack followed intermission. 

This noted Irish star has seen his best 
days as far as his singing voice is con- 
cerned. He sang a number of songs with 
an effort, but his voice has gone back on 
him. He bellows rather than sings, his 
voice having a fog-horn quality. Added to 
this defect, the second number was sung 
noticeably flat. Mack has a likable per- 
sonality, which did much to put him over. 
Also he has a score of stories which are 
very well told. A recitation is fairly well 
done. 

But his singing detracted from the whole 
act, and if it weren't for the fact that in 
his final song number he lowered a gor- 
geous American flag drop, while singing a 
song with patriotic, red-blooded words, he 
probably would have suffered a miserable 
flop. Dragging in Old Glory at the psycho- 
logical moment brought forth applause 
■which would never have been his other- 
wise. 

Claud and Fannie Usher — not to forget 
Spareribs, the dog! — are appearing in 
"Fagan's Decision." The Ushers are a 
clever dno and enact a human interest 
story in a most appealing way. Claud 
Usher, as an ex-pugilist, gives a realistic 
performance while Fannie Usher, as the 
Orphan, Patsy, gives an unusually natural 
interpretation of this whimsical character. 
Nor Is Spareribs such a bad performer. 

Lillian Shaw closed the vaudeville bill 
with her baby carriage specialty and sev- 
eral new numbers. She will be reviewed 
under New Acts. 

The audience did not seem very inter- 
ested in seeing bow "Patria" ended, and 
walked out on the fifteenth episode as they 
have on the other fourteen. H. G. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on page 11) 



RIVERSIDE 

With Rock and White heading the bill, 
James J. Morton as a special feature an- 
nouncing the acts, and one of the best all 
around programs of the season, Monday 
night saw a capacity audience at this 
popular playhouse. 

After the Hearst-Pathe News Pictorial, 
the Five Nelsons entertained briefly with 
some high-class juggling and hoop rolling. 
The act is nicely mounted and the young 
men do a number of clever tricks. 

Carl McCullough, late of "Canary Cot- 
tage," told some stories and sang several 
songs including the "Syncopated Harp" 
from the "Cottage" show which, with his 
impressions of Warfield, Lauder and Jol- 
son as they would sing the chorus, brought 
him considerable applause. Daring the 
coming summer vacation it would be an 
excellent idea for Mr. McCullough to hunt 
up a good vocal teacher and give his voice 
attention. No vocal chords will for any 
great length of time withstand the strain 
he is putting upon them by his method of 
vocalizing. 

Will Ward and his five symphony girls 
have 8 somewhat different piano and sing- 
ing act which greatly pleased. All the 
girls play well and Ward puts over his 
songs in excellent shape. Irish song num- 
bers predominate in the offering, and he 
has made a good selection, of popular num- 
bers. 

AJ. Gerard and Sylvia Clark, have in 
"Modern Vaudeville Frolics," an act con- 
structed solely for laughing purposes, and 
with it they succeed admirably. Few 
vaudeville teams possess more ability than 
this clever pair, who will donbtless find 
their way into musical comedy before many 
seasons pass. 

George Merck's sensational "The Wild 
Guardians" closed intermission, and the 
wordless play commencing with a moving 
picture of a lion hunt in Africa and end- 
ing with one of the most sensational pieces 
of lion taming ever seen on a vaudeville 
stage left the audience well nigh breathless. 
Marck'8 method of presenting what would 
in less experienced hands be bat a good 
animal act, stamps him as a showman of 
the highest order. 

William Rock and Frances White 
opened intermission and showed an act 
which differed considerably from the one 
they have been giving in the local houses. 
Miss White sings but little, cutting all her 
songs except the "Monkey" number and a 
chorus of "M-i-s-s-i-s-s-i-p-p-i," given after 
repeated calls from the audience. Either 
Miss White is suffering from a bad cold or 
her voice is showing the strain of a hard 
season's work, as it broke badly in the 
upper register. While Miss White and 
Mr. Rock dance nicely and do several 
clever burlesque bits, without her songs 
the act falls far short of its accustomed 
standard. Nevertheless, they scored a hit 
of pronounced proportions. 

Kate Elinore and Sam Williams fol- 
lowed and their new act pleased greatly. 
Miss Elinore is a real comedienne and 
Williams makes a clever straight. The 
act has been considerably brightened up 
since ita first showing a few weeks ago, 
and is now one of the best, this couple 
have presented. Williams plays the piano 
and sings a couple of songs acceptably. 

Amelia Stone and Armand Kalisz in 
"Ma'mzelle Caprice," Edgar Allen Woolf s 
playlet which has served them so long and 
acceptably, gave their usual finished per- 
formance. Coming so late in the bill and 
following so many strong features the 
act, on account of its qniet daintiness 
did not receive the recognition which it 
would have donbtless been accorded bad 
it been placed in an earlier position. 

Mrs. Vernon Castle, in the Fifteenth 
and final episode of "Patria." closed the 
wn. W. V. 



PALACE 

Opening the show with the usual pa- 
triotic medley and the final installment of 
"Patria," the program ran smoothly all 
the way. 

"Patria's" finish faded out as the Stars 
and Stripes were displayed on the screen 
and the show proper started with Apdale's 
Zoological Circus which proved both inter- 
esting and entertaining. The trained bears 
and dogs, and the ant-eater, went through 
the routine of stunts to good applause. 

Ben Bernie and Phil Baker, with their 
violin and accordeon, were a big hit. The 
boys have a thread of comedy running 
through the act which brings results in 
good proportions. After their regular line 
of melodies they ask the audience to re- 
quest a number and play four of them. 
They bowed off to a regular Palace hit. 

Dugan and Raymond, offering their com- 
edy skit "They Auto Know Better," did 
not do as well as was expected in the third 
spot. The trick auto in the act is the 
chief "prop" for laughs, and the dialogue 
and situations totter with apparent weak- 
ness. The "what-do-you-want? what-have- 
yon-got" line of dialogue does not belong. 

Leo Beers, dressed as immaculately as 
before, opened with his well-known whis- 
tling stunt and then sang several new 
songs which went nicely. A new piano 
was introduced and also a new drop. He 
finished big. 

Phyllis Neilson-Terry closed the first 
part and is reviewed under New Acta. 

After intermission, Bert Melrose, fea- 
turing his four-table high fall, appeared 
without any make-up and furnished ten 
minutes of amusement and then a thrill, 
interpolating several new bits of comedy. 

Adele Rowland, assisted by Sidney 
Franklin at the piano, sang several songs 
in her usual manner and will be fully re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

After Melrose came Paul Dickey and a 
corking good company of artists in a com- 
edy drama, running at top speed, called 
"The Lincoln Highwayman." The atmo- 
sphere of the act is early established, 
and the plot is pat over in regular two 
dollar style. Dickey is the author of the 
playlet and is also the chief factor in its 
fast motion, making every point count and 
every word bring results. The finish, with 
its surprise punch, went over to a big hand, 
making Pan! Dickey and company an easy 
hit. 

George White and Lucille Cavanagh are 
retained for a third week and offered 
nearly the same act, inasmuch as the ar- 
rangement of their songs, dances and 
wardrobe went over and showed excellent 
judgment throughout. 

They opened with the "Flirtation" num- 
ber and closed with their version of "Walk- 
ing the Dog" to big appreciation. Miss 
Cavanagh introduced a new dance called 
"The Dance of the Fan," and the act held 
the audience to the very finish 

The real hits of this week's Palace show 
were Bernie and Baker, Paul Dickey and 
company, and White and Cavanagh, with 
the show running a trifle short on comedy. 

S. L. H. 



NEW SKETCH AT GROVE 

Leon Errol and Henry Clives appeared 
in a new sketch entitled, "Legerdemania," 
at Coeoanut Grove, Monday night. 



ETHEL CLIFTON FOR VAUDE. 
Ethel Clifton, author of sketches and 
actress, win shortly make her vaudevflle 
debut in a sketch she wrote entitled, 
"Cindy." 

JOE SPIEGEL IN NEW ACT 

Joe Spiegel, formerly of Spiegel and 
Donne, is doing a new act with Billy 
Jones. 



ROYAL 

Manager Egan is offering a bill at his 
theatre this week of which the Palace 
could be justly proud. 

It does not run in the order mentioned 
on the program, the Norman Brothers clos- 
ing instead of opening the show and 
Arnold and Taylor being switched from 
the second half of the bill to number two 
spot, although Jones and Elaine would 
have been a wiser choice for the second 
position, the other team being by far the 
stronger act. 

Sam K. Nainoa opened the show, play- 
ing upon his Hawaiian guitar. His is a 
very quiet act for an opener, but his work 
seemed to pass muster. 

Arnold and Taylor, in the second spot, 
found it necessary to make a curtain 
speech before they were allowed to with- 
draw. The act is reviewed under Naw 
Acts. 

Arthur Havel and Company seem to do 
a little of everything in Will Cresay*s 
comedy playlet, "Playmates." Their sing, 
ing and slapstick went over with equal 
ease for a smashing hit. 

Mabel Russell and Marty Ward and 
Company found applause-getting an easy 
thing. The Royalites liked their harmon- 
izing. The conundrums that Ward springs 
seemed very popular with the audience. 
The operatic burlesque was not up to the 
other numbers in the turn, however. A 
medley of old songs pleased and when, 
near the end of the medley, Eddie Leonard 
interrupted from the wings with the strain 
of his "Ida" song, the house broke loose, 
and it was easy to see that Leonard was 
the drawing card which packed the house 
Monday night. 

Whether it waa because of the act's In- 
dividual merits or because of the fact that 
Leonard had co-operated with them, the 
fact remains that the audience would not 
let the turn off the stage until Miss Rus- 
seU (Mrs. Eddie Leonard) made a pretty 
little thank you speech, making the second 
curtain speech on the bill. 

The show was going at such a high speed 
by this time that the possibilities of a 
playlet succeeding in the next spot looked 
dubious. Claire Vincent, supported by 
Frank H. Gardner and Walter R. Boss, in 
"The Recoil" had a difficult task in front 
of them and accomplished what had 
seemed well night impossible when they 
extracted whole hearted laughs at will 
and scored one of the big hits of the 
evening. Miss Vincent is a finished 
actress and is given good support by 
Gardner and Boss. 

"America" waa played during intermis- 
sion while its words were flashed on the 
screen. The audience seemed possessed of 
a true American spirit and sang the 
words with a great deal of vigor. 

Dave Jones and Mildred Elaine ores- 
. ented "Love Gamblers," written by Junie 
McCree and billed as "a satire with 
music." 

Despite the excellence of the program, 
the audience had come to see Eddie 
Leonard and were waiting patiently for 
him to appear. When the cardboys put 
up his name the applause which greeted 
his name proved it. 

Leonard was rather stingy with his 
songs. After doing one song number and 
one dance, the curtain went down and 
the audience nearly wore blisters on its 
hands applauding before he came oat 
again and sang *Tda" and "Roly Poly 
Eyes." Then, amidst a big demonstra- 
tion, he spent seven or eight minutes in 
thanking the audience and stalling in 
general, when the right thing for him to 
have done would have been to sing another 
song. 

The Norman Brothers closed the show 
and gave a creditable performance. 
These two boys are .talented gymnasts and 
make an exceptionally good closing act. 

The Bronxtt.es. who have been more 
loyal to "Patria" than other . Keith au- 
diences, saw the last installment of this 
serial. H. G. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 




"SONGS ft HOUR" 
"SONGS ft HEART" 

By CHAS. K. HARRIS and bia staff of 
classy writers. Each and every one a 
HIT: 

'"THOIFSHALT 

MOT STEAL" 

(A Heart Away) 

Chas. K. Harris' newest heart-story 
ballad. Lyric by Jack Yellen. The 
wonder ballad of the season. 

"COMEBACK" 

(Let's Be Sweethearts Once More) 

Br CHAS. K. HARRIS 

The reigning ballad success of the year. 

"A STUDY IN BLACK 

AND WHITE" 

Br CHAS. K. HARRIS 

Willa Holt Wakefield's knockout hit. 

"You Came. You Saw, 
You Conquered" 

Br CHAS. K. HARRIS 

The ballad beautiful in 12-8 time. A 
song that will live forever. 

"lef'Him Mies You 
Just a Little Bit" 

(And He'll Think Mora of Yon) 
A catchy single or double number. A 
real live hit by three "live" writers, 
Chas. K. Harris and Van & Schenclc 



■ ■ 



It's a Long. Long Time 



Hoi 



Since I've Been Home" 

Van & Schick's Century Theatre 
novelty song; hit. 

"ATiTHE HULA 

HULA BALL" 

The greatest "jazz" sony on the mar- 
ket today. By the papular writer, Billy 
Vanderveer. 

"LOVE ME ALL THE 
TIME" 

By the celebrated Musical Comedy 
writer — now being; sung by the Author 
and composer to a dozen encores nightly 
—Jos. E. Howard. 

VAN A SCHENOCS HIT OF THE 
SEASON— A riot whenever or w h erevw 



"MY LITTLE 

CHINA DOLL" 

AN ORIENTAL SERENADE 



Also the following Standard song hits 
of the season, by the "hit" writer, 
Chas. K. Harris: 

"ALL I WANT IS A COTTAGE, 

SOME ROSES AND YOU" 
"THE STORY OF A SOUL" 
"SONGS OF YESTERDAY" 

And JOS. E. HOWARD'S Wonderful 
Vaudeville Success: 

"LOVE ME LITTLE, 

LOVE ME LONG" 

ALL PUBLISHED BY 

CHAS. K. HARRIS 

47th St & B'way, NEW YORK CITY 




AMERICAN 

A good bill for the first half of the 
week drew a foil house downstairs and a 
well-tilled roof on Monday night. 

On the roof, the Two Brownies, two 
men, opened the bill. They began with a 
song, then went to soft shoe dancing, at 
which they are adepts, and finished on 
roller skates. They are skillful skaters, 
and, although their act is done in one, 
they do many difficult stunts on rollers. 
Their final stunt is a clog on skates, and 
they went off to a big round of applause. 

In number two position, Beth Mayo 
scored heavily. She sang several songs 
away from the usual ran but of the popu- 
lar kind, and pleased so well that she was 
forced to respond to an encore. Miss 
Mayo has a very pleasing personality and 
a style quite • her own. Her material is 
good and she knows how to put it over. 

The Borsini Troupe, three men and 
two women, on revolving globes, present 
a very out-of-the-ordinary act. They are 
not only skilled performers on globes, but 
are expert acrobats as well, and some of 
the stunts they do are remarkably clever. 
One, in particular, the human bridge, is 
startling. A man and a woman each 
stand on a globe, while another man, with 
his head resting on the woman's head, and 
his feet on the man's head, forms the 
bridge. This is a good trick when per- 
formed with the acrobats standing on the 
stage, but when they stand on globes it 
becomes a dare-devil feat. As a finish 
the women and one man, standing on 
globes, support two bars, on which the 
two other men do horizontal bar stunts. 
They received well deserved approval for 
their work. 

Tommy Hayden is a clever performer 
with a striking personality. He opens as 
a modified English chappie and sings a 
number of songs which he pets over to the 
best advantage. He then changes to a 
green knickerbocker suit, and gives an 
Englishman's idea of the first baseball 
game he ever witnessed. 

In this, he keeps his audience laughing 
from start to finish. His material is 
bright and snappy, and he gets the most 
possible out of it. He was the great big 
bit of the bill, and even after he bad 
responded to an encore, was recalled half 
a dozen times. 

Orren and Drew, just preceding inter- 
mission, were also a big hit with their 
imitations. Orren is one of the best mim- 
ics our stage has seen, and his imita- 
tions of a country hand tuning np, five 
dogs fighting, a locomotive whistle, chick- 
ens, and several other animal, and instru- 
ments, are as near perfection as possible. 
Miss Drew whistles a bird song capitally. 
They carry a special drop representing a 
farm and barnyard scene. 

Burnelly and PurteD, man and woman, 
followed the intermission, and came in 
for well-deserved recognition. The man 
has a pleasing personality and the woman 
is pretty. They sing well and rendered 
a number of songs, duets and solos to 
good applause. 

Harry- Fern and his little company of 
three presented his well-known sketch 
"Veterans" and found his usual favor. 

Denny and Sykes, two men, present a 
piano and singing act, a little different 
from those in its class. They are not 
strong on voices, but they are thorough en- 
tertainers and know how to get their ma- 
terial over the footlights. They have good 
songs, and their peculiar style of rendering 

them enhances their value. Denny fingers 
the ivories and Sykes does most of the 
singing. The audience showed its approval 
by loud applause and an insistence for an 
encore that would not be denied. So the 
boys were forced to respond. 

The Valadons, a man and a woman, pre- 
sented their wire act to good results. The 
woman does the wire work, and is a grace- 
ful and clever performer. They closed the 
vaudeville part' of the bin and went off to 
a good hand. 

The feature picture shown was "The 
Butcher Boy" with Boscoe (Fatty) Ar- 
buckle as the star. This is his first picture 
produced by his own company. E. W. 



JEFFERSON 

"Womanhood, the Glory of the Nation" 
was featured here. 

Jolly Johnny Jones opens the vaudeville 
show with a performance on the tight rope. 
Xbe act opens in one, with a set repre- 
senting a stage door and some pantomime 
business is done with a woman assistant, 
A change is made to full stage and the 
work on the tight rope then begins. 

Lowy and Lacey the Girls presented 
their singing and. talking act to good ap- 
plause. * 

Delmore, Angel and company, reviewed 
some time ago under the name of Arthur 
Franklyn and company, have met the 
spirit of the times. The act has been 
adapted to the present war, instead of to 
our trouble with Mexico as formerly, and 
received thunierous applause. The vet- 
eran, who recounts to the young man what 
a "devil" he is, gets the laughs and, at 
the finish, when he shoulders a gun and 
gets into step to join his regiment, met 
with great approval 

Ed and Lou Miller entertained with 
songs, opening with one telling how popu- 
lar songs are made. Their best number 
was the operatic selection, which was best 
liked of all. 

"Merry Married Men," is a farcical 
sketch which contains several funny lines. 
Two married men get away from their 
wives and come to Pleasant Inn, where 
a lot of young girls are spending their 
vacation. How each man tried to pass off 
a young girl as the other one's wife, to 
his own wife, got a few laughs. 

Cantwell and Walker could not seem to 
inject the necessary pep into their act and 
had slow going. However, they forced a 
big finish with the Hawaiian dance by 
Miss Walker, accompanied on the ukulele. 

Walter Baker and company presented 
sleight of hand and magic stunts, but re- 
ceived only .faint applause for their ef- 
forts. S. W. 



CITY 

Kate and Wiley offer an equilibristic 
and posing act which is highly commend- 
able. 

Gehap and Spencer, two men who pos- 
sess no ordinary dancing ability, were 
coldly treated by the audience. This was 
not the fault of their dancing, but of the 
talk which they keep up which in addi- 
tion to being sadly deficient in comedy, 
is not always in good taste. 

Arthur DeVoy and company present a 
mildly entertaining sketch in which a 
young married couple quarrel over some 
trivial thing and the husband blames the 
girl's mother as the cause of their mis- 
understandings. The mother really rides 
with her son-in-law and, together with an 
old sweetheart of hers, they patch things 
np. 

Bell and Fredo, Italian comedians, went 
over big. The one who plays the ukalelc 
gets the bulk of the applause. ' The other 
loses the accent in his songs, which mars 
the consistency of the act 

Fitzgerald and White put over a good 
deal of nonsense. They did not begin to 
be interesting until the girl started to talk 
"under her nose." Their whispering got 
a big laugh and they finished with a gro- 
tesque dance. 

Lawrence Grant and company presented 
a sketch entitled "The Final Arbiter." 
The act as an appeal to patriotism and is 
ont of the ordinary. It contained many 
truths which we have been made to feel 
in the "present war, and the sentiments 
met with a big response from the audi- 
ence. It is well acted, too. 

Geo. McFadden got very little applause 
with bis monologue. 

Walthonr and the Princeton Girls offer 
a neat cycling act, and closed the vaude- 
ville show. S. W. 



FIFTH AVENUE • 

The balmy spring weather of last Mon- 
day had no deterrent effect upon the at- 
tendance here, and the usual capacity 
bouse was in evidence. 

The Brightens, a man and woman call- 
ing themselves "Artistic Bag pickers," 
folly lived up to the title. Using nothing 
but pieces of fabric of various colors and 
many different sizes, they made some very 
remarkable art studies. Their first was a 
landscape, a big dog's head followed, then 
likenesses of Lincoln and Wilson, and the 
finish was three horses' heads looking over 
the edge of a stall. The pictures of the 
dog and the horses were real studies, and 
the hearty recognition extended to the pair 
was well deserved. 

Regal and Bender, in their mixture of 
singing, talking and acrobatics, scored a 
most pronounced success. They excel as 
acrobats and hand balancers, and their 
foot-to-hand catch and foot-to-foot catch 
are among the best stunts done by per- 
formers in their line. Their singing and 
talking give them a chance for resting be- 
tween stunts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allison presented their 
sketch called "Minnie from Minnesota." 
The skit is clever and well portrayed. Al- 
lison, as the bard-np composer, and his 
wife, as the greenhorn Swedish girl, who 
is not so verdant as she appears to be, 
did capital work. Mrs. Allison is a good 
comedienne, and her husband has a pleas- 
ing voice. They met with well-earned ap- 
proval. 

Julia Curtis appeared, though not billed, 
and was one of the big hits of the bill. 
Miss Curtis is a remarkable mimic of in- 
struments, birds and animals, and has a 
way of introducing her imitations which is 
all her own. A bird, a parrot, a cat and 
a monkey are cleverly done, while her imi- 
tations of the piccolo and violin are so 
nearly like those instruments that it is 
difficult to say which is which when the 
orchestra accompanies her. 

George Dameral presented his tabloid 
musical comedy entitled "Temptation," in 
which be is assisted by Myrtle Tail and 
Edward Hume. The story of. the skit is 
a modified Mephisto and Faust tale. 

Mephisto has relied upon the Princess 
of Hell to cause the downfall of men. She 
has been bis aid for more than 5,000 years, 
in which time she has caused the ruin of 
more than 15,000,000 single men and 
numberless married men. She has become 
satiated with . her work because it is so 
easy and asks the Devil to furnish a man 
who does not fall for the wiles that have 
been used by woman since Eve's time. 
The Devil finds the young man and the 
Princess fails to impress him as a woman. 
As a mermaid, however, she captures him. 

Dameral as the non-susceptible young 
man did capital work and sang a song as 
he well knows how to sing. Hume, as 
the comedy cabby, furnished plenty of 
laughs, and Miss Vail won favor for her 
portrayal of the temptress, and the man 
who did the Devil was equal to the task 
set him. There was a chorus of six pretty 
girls who wore pretty costumes and sang 
and danced well. There are two special 
sets, in one and fall stage. The tab. was 
capital entertainment and scored big. 

Charles Irwin and Kitty Henry, in their 
singing, talking and dancing act, which 
they style "Comin* Through the Bye," 
came in for their full share of approval. 
They are clever performers and have good 
material which they know how to put 
over. Miss Henry is a good dancer and 
Irwin. a good comedian. 

Sascha Pitov, assisted by Vivian Lie- 
land, Mile. Bailie and Flora Star, 'were 
seen in "A Little Bit of Everything.** 
Two of the women are good, dancers and 
the other has a well cultured voice. Pitov 
has set ont a routine of dancing which 
he can not carry out as he was perceptibly 
tired before half through the act. . 

Mabel Burke sang an illustrated song, 
and Mrs. Vernon Castle in "Patria" and 
Fatty Arbuckle in "The Butcher Boy" 
were feature films. E, W. 



VAUDE GETS CHARLOTTE 

Charlotte and four of the Hippodrome 
girls will appear in a vaudeville act next 
season under the direction of H. B. Mari- 
nelli 



PRIMROSE TO RETIRE 
George Primrose, the veteran minstrel, 
upon the conclusion of bis engagement on 
the Lowe Circuit, June 1, will retire from 
the stage. 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



VML7. 




PHYLLIS NIELSEN-TERRY 

Theatre— Palace. 

Style— Song* and sketch. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting— Speoia I 

It seemed doubtful to a patient oh- 
server, if vaudeville was ready to ac- 
cept Shakespeare, or, at least, Miss 
Terry's version of a scene from. "Ham- 
let" seriously, until the very finish. Sev- 
eral times it seemed as though the crowd 
would relish entertainment of a lighter 
sort more readily, and the sight of 
Ophelia ranting and raving was hardly 
an exhibition to add zest to a variety en- 
tertainment. 

Miss* Terry opened with two songs 
which should have been used as encores, 
and would have been more impressive 
had that arrangement been followed. As 
it stands now. Miss Terry steps ont in 
"one" and sings "Alice Ben Bolt" and 
"Couplets du MysolL" She sings them 
both well, but they give the audience the 
impression that she is more of a singer 
than a dramatic actress. Miss Terr? is 
both, and in the scene from "Hamlet" 
displayed all her dramatic ability, which 
won individual honors. 

As for the supporting- cast in the 
"Hamlet" scene, there seems to be 
neither articulation nor intelligent read- 
ing of the lines. 

Miss Terry can greatly enhance the 
value of her offering by doing the sketch 
first and finishing with the songs, which 
are by far the best thing in her present 
offering. S. T* H. 



NEW AOTS 



(Cnntlmwl 



IU 



JACK ALFRED & CO. 

Theatre— Royal 
Style— Acrobatic novelty. 

Time — hi lev en minutes. 
Setting— II oute. 

This act has no peer among acrobatic 
novelty acta, It will bring down any 
house, juat as it did the Royal at Mon- 
day's matinee. 

There are three men in the torn. 
They are acrobats. who are endeavoring 
to secure a vaudeville booking. One of 
their number comes in with the glad 
tidings that he is on the track of a 
booking for them and they then proceed 
to rehearse their act. 

This gives plenty of chance for com- 
edy, bat the trio is not content to resort 
only to hokum to put over their act, but 
do some very hazardous acrobatic feats 
as well, which would get over even 
without the novelty that has been in- 
jected into the turn. H. 6. 



MAE WEST 



Theatre— Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 

Style — Singing comedienne. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting— One. 

Mae West bills herself as "The Differ- 
ent Type of Songstress." 

Her opening song is about a "Wild 
Woman," in which she is clad in ' a 
tiger skin robe, with her hair arranged 
"a la Tanguay" Her enunciation is 
poor, and she sings her numbers with a 
nasal twang. Her gesturing throughout 
the number is of a very suggestive na- 
ture, and she leaves little for the imagi- 
nation, executing her work in a risque 
manner. 

Her ascend number, about The Old- 
Faahioned Girl," is rather neatly pre- 
sented. But the following one is repug- 
nant and repellent The number is 
about the way the "Twentieth Century 
Girl" loves. The lyrics are suggestive 
throughout, and her manner of delivery 
is typical of the song. 

Clad as a "chappy" in a walking suit, 
she sings a song about being The 
Wisest Guy of All," and for a finish 
does a dance with a "prop" dummy. 
Should the average "cooch" dancer try 
' to present such an offering, she might be 
int erf ere d with by- the police. A. TJ. 



ARNOLD AND TAYLOR 

Theatre— Royal 

Style — Musical skit. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. 

Ethel Arnold and Earl Taylor find 
themselves dispossessed and are thrown 
out into the street with their piano and 
baggage. 

He sits down at the piano and plays 
Bliss Taylor's accompaniments.' She 
sings a number of songs. The first is a 
satire on "The End of a Perfect Day." 
The second number concerns a man wbo 
has fallen off the water wagon. The 
third song knocks knockers. It is her 
strongest selection. 

She then finds fifty dollars hid inside 
of the piano, whereupon they pay their 
overdue rent and she recites a poem 
about the advisability of singing sorrow 
away, as they have done. 

For an . encore, they "rag" "Mighty 
Lak a Rose." This number is full of 
"pep." 

The team are a hard working duo with 
likable personalities and an abundance 
of talent. H. O. 



ANDY RICE 

Theatre— Colonial. 

Style— Monologue. 

Time — Thirteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

In a Yiddish dialect, Rice tells the 
audience of the goings-on of himself and 
his Hebrew friends. As a whole, the 
monologue is humorous, but there does 
not seem to be enough backbone to the 
act. Rice has not much stage presence, 
and it is as if he were delivering his 
monologue in the front parlor of his home 
rather than in the theatre. 

More ginger will have to be injected 
into his stuff before it will, get over suc- 
cessfully. 

There are also many gags in the mono- 
logue which are either blue or vulgar. 
An allusion to a barefoot dancer with a 
corn plaster on her big toe and the gag 
about the doctor offering bis services to 
extract the clam are two, of many ex- 
amples, which might be given. 

The monologue is in need of a lot of 
revision. H. G. 



ROGERS & BROCKWAY 

Theatre — Proctor's Twenty-third Street s 

Style — Comedy shit. 

Time— Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

A "cop" and a street cleaner are the 
types assumed by these men for their 
new vaudeville offering. Their dialogue 
throughout is of a crispy nature and of 
a sort to please the patrons of neigh- 
borhood theatres. 

As is the case with the majority of 
turns playing neighborhood theatres, 
this act relies a little too much on its 
"Old Glory" features to carry it along. 
There is no doubt that this style bf ma- 
terial is helpful at the present time, 
but an act should try and use material 
which will receive the approbation of 
tbe audience on its merits. 

Two patriotic numbers . are used in 
the turn, and, naturally, bear great 
weight in carrying the turn along. It 
might be suggested that the "black- 
face" man cut ont his "bit" of leading 
the orchestra in "discord" harmony and 
allow his partner to do his cornet solo 
straight. The number would be a great 
deal more impressive. The finish, with 
song and cornet, ia neatly executed. 

With the change of material as sug- 
gested and the elimination of the or- 
chestra bit, the turn will develop into 
a suitable neighborhood theatre offering. 
. A.TJ. 



ADELE ROWLAND 

Theatre— Mm 

Style-— Singing. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Adele Rowland, dressed in a pink af- 
fair, draped in a cape and gown effect, 
opened her act, with Sydney Franklin 
at tbe piano, singing a semi-patriotic 
song which amounted to little. Discard- 
ing the cape she sang an Irish song in 
which she lost her brogue at various in- 
tervals. 

Franklin next offered a piano solo 
which went nicely. 

A "Red-Cross Nurse" song followed, 
which had three verses and choruses and 
is really the only thing worth while in 
the act In this number. Miss Rowland 
has plenty of opportunity of putting 
over some nifty lyrics and at the same 
time looking well. In the third number, 
she is dressed in an evening gown of 
sapphire blue and sings a waltz song, in- 
terpolating a few dance steps as Grace 
La Rue has done time and again. 

Her following song was an attempt at 
comedy and a silent request for the audi- 
ence to join in the chorus, which it did 
not do. Her final number is a "nut" 
song and brought very meager returns. 
In fact, there is nothing in Miss Row- 
land's act outside of the "nurse" num- 
ber and the piano player. Her attempts 
at comedy are sad. S. L. H. 



BELL & FREDO 

Theatre — Audubon. 

Style — Italian comedy and song. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

Bell and Fredo start off in a manner 
that is entirely too reminiscent of Clark 
& Verdi, although the dialogue is not as 
funny. 

After tbe dialogue, one of the team 
plays upon an instrument fashioned af- 
ter a violin. It has a very squeaky 
sound and the number is saved from be- 
ing unpleasant by the fun which tbe 
other fellow pokes at the musician. 

One of the team discards his Italian 
dialect and sings a popular ballad that 
goes over well. 

Tbe other member of the duo next of- 
fers - a real specialty, with an original 
dance, to tbe accompaniment of a guitar 
which he plays while dancing. This is 
a sure-fire hit. 

They close with a duet number and, 
for an encore, sing a popular song as 
two Italians might interpret it 

The last half of the act is by far the 
better half. The duo seem to succeed 
better when they sing and play than 
when they do their "wop" business, which 
brings this reviewer to the conclusion 
that the pair should remodel their act, 
leaving the Italian part to the teams who 
can put it over better. Making their act 
purely musical, this pair would probably 
clean up even more successfully than at 
present. H. G. 



HOWARD AND HURST 

Theatre— Folly, Brooklyn. 
Style— Singing. 
Time — Sirt&tm minute*. 
Setting— In. one. 

Murray Howard and Honey Hurst 
present a repertoire of popular songs 
which are rang in a snappy and pleasing 
way. In their opening number they ex- 
plain they are vaudeville salesmen and 
trust that the audience will like their 
goods. This number has clever words 
and is put over nicely. An Hawaiian 
number follows, which ia also an ap- 
plause getter. 

Miss Hurst sings a solo. Although 
she sings pleasantly enough, more care 
should be given to clearer enunciation. 

Howard sings a Yiddish character 
song, after which the pair close with a 
"back-home" number, which is the beat 
thing they do, bringing down the bouse. 
It should, however, be sung with a 
brighter spot 

A novelty song is used as an encore. 

The pair are finding it easy going and 
are a talented duo of songsters. H. G. 

BURLINGTON FOUR 

Theatre— Royal. 
Style — Rube quartette. 
Time— Seventeen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

This quartette works in front of a 
rube railroad station drop. 

They open their act with some com- 
edy recited to a "by heck" rhythm, 
after which they sing. Between songs 
they put over a number of gags. Thoir 
numbers are all of the popular sort, the 
one about the rolling chair being their 
bes.t. 

At tbe very end of their turn the 
quartette reappears with ukuleles, steel 
guitars and other Hawaiian instruments 
and plays a medley, which ia well done. 
The boys should add another instru- 
mental number to their turn. H. G. 



BEAUMONT AND ARNOLD 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Sketch teifh singing and dancing. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— Houte. 

"The Sergeanteene" is the title of the 
new sketch which Bertie Beaumonte 
and Jack Arnold presented last Mon- 
day. It is cleverly put together, and is 
about a young woman in an army re- 
cruiting station who succeeds in induc- 
ing a young man to sign up to do his 
bit with Uncle Sam. It contains some 
good patter, and is an excellent vehicle, 
and gives this clever team opportunity 
to introduc e their singing and d a ncing . . 



REED AND WRIGHT GIRLS 

Theatre — Colonial. 

Style — Song and dance. 

Time— Twelve minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

Two pretty girls and a manly appear- 
ing fellow constitute this clever trio. 

They open with a snappy want-to-go- 
back-home number in which they har- 
monize very pleasantly and show that 
they have singing voices considerably 
above the ^average. One of the girls 
sings a novelty song followed by a short 
and gracefqjl dance. 

Next, Reed does some fancy stepping. 
The two girls then sing a duet in which 
their voices blend very harmoniously. 
Reed next plays a violin solo, after which 
the act closes with a song by the two 
girls, while Reed plays a violin obligate 
The pair show that they have a good 
amount of versatility and appear to good 
advantage in all their numbers. It is a 
classy act H. G. 



LILLIAN SHAW 

Theatre — Colonial 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Seventeen minutes. 
Setting — In one and two. 

Lillian Shaw sings a number of Char- 
acter songs in a most entertaining man- 
ner and has things pretty mueh her own 
way during the seventeen minutes she is 
on the stage. 

Her first is an Italian number about 
eating and growing thin. She then 
changes to a Yiddish characterization, 
singing two numbers which go over well. 
The best thing in her repertoire is her 
familiar baby carriage number, which 
goes over with a bang in which this tal- 
ented artiste is seen at her best. 

She responds to an encore with a pa- 
triotic song which is well sung. H. O. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 



iPIIIllillllillllliiillll 



AT B. F. KEITH'S 

ALHAMBRA THEATRE 

THIS WEEK, APRIL 23 

METROPOLITAN DEBUT OF 

MABELLE 




AND 




IN A NEW ACT BY HERBERT MOORE ENTITLED 



"AT 




MOTOR 




ff 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




Founded tat ISO by Frank Qumo 

Published by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Orland W. Vans-ham.. .President and Secretary 

Frederick C Mailer. Treasurer 

1604 Broadway. New York 

Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 

Paol C Sweinbart, Managing Editor 

MEW YORK, APRIL 25, 1917 

Entered June 24, 1879, at the Poat Office at 
New York, N. Y-, as second daia matter, un- 
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Stationery Co.. 128 Eacalta Street, Sydney, 
N. S. W. . Australia. 



THE PASSING OF "DIAMOND JIM" 

The passing of James Buchanan Brady, 
"Diamond Jim," leaves a vacancy in the 
ranks of theatre devotees that will never 
be filled. He was the best known patron 
of amusements in America and probably 
in the world, for his fame had been car- 
ried beyond the seas to the regular first- 
nighter in London, where bis name was 
nearly as well known as it was in New 
York. 

Everybody knew "Diamond Jim" Brady, 
and he, in tarn, knew everybody. He was 
one of the moet unique characters the 
country has ever produced and the the- 
atre has never seen his like. Not con- 
nected with it, yet he was a part of it, 
and this paradox was well in keeping 
with his general characteristics, for he 
was the very embodiment of paradoxes 
and contradictions. 

He lived in two worlds, a day world and 
a night world. And the twenty-hour hours 
were equally divided between business and 
pleasure. From morning till night nothing 
but business entered into his curriculum, 
and with the nightfall he thrust aside 
the money-getting side of life and entered 
upon the pleasure seeking side. No one 
but bis intimates could realize that the 
gaiety-loving "Diamond Jim" of the even- 
ing and the busy money getting James 
Buchanan Brady of the day were one 
and the same. 

"Diamond Jim" never let business and 
pleasure interfere with each other, and 
there was only one thing he permitted to 
interfere with either, and that was charity. 
A charitable object could claim bis atten- 
tion at any time, but he was loath to let 
any one bnt his most intimate associates 
know of this "weakness." as he called it. 

"Diamond Jim" was the most consistent 
midnight diner in New York. There was 
probably not a night in the week that 
he did not spend the early part of it in a 
theatre or cabaret and the latter part until 
early morning at a table filled with the 
choicest viands and surrounded by his 
friends. 

"Diamond Jim" Brady will be genuinely 
missed. He will be missed by the first- 
nighter accustomed to see his familiar fig- 
ure coming np the aisle from the seat in 
the first row. He will be missed by the 
midnight restaurant patron. In fact, he 
wffl be missed by everyone who had. ever 
seen Mm. There was only one "Diamond 
Jim" Brady— there will never be another. 



Answers to Queries 

O. F. D. — Michael Morton is an Amer- 
ican. 

• • a 

R. A., Salem. — "Cabiria" was shown at 
the Knickerbocker Theatre. 

• *> • 

O. S. M. — Florence Reed was the daugh- 
ter of the late Roland Reed. 

• • • 

M. U., Boston.— B. F. Keith died March 
26, 1914, at Palm Beach. Fla, 

• • • 

J. O. — The Olub Theatre, Rochester, 
N. Y., was a burlesque bouse in 1014. 

• • • 

A. D. G. — John Mason was for. years 
a member of the Boston Museum Stock 
Company. 

• *>.*) 

Q. O. — George Nash was never a mem- 
ber of Charles Frohman'B Empire Theatre 
Stock Co. 

• • • 

S. T.. Harlem.— "She's In Again" was 
produced at the Gaiety, New York, in 
May, 1015. 

• • • 

E. C. F.— The late Clyde Fitch was one 
of the most prolific playwrights this coun- 
try has produced. 

• • • 

N. O., Philadelphia.— Charles Frohman 
presented Billie Burke in "Jerry" March 

28, 1014. at the Lyceum Theatre. 

• • • 

S. S. O. — There have been more Ameri- 
can plays successes in London since the 
European war began than ever before. 

• . • • 

B. B., Toronto. — Margaret Anglin played 
the leading feminine role in "The Great 
Divide" when it was originally produced. 

• m • 

N. G.— Neil Burgess did not write "The 
County Fair," but he appeared in it. Yes, 
Robert Fisher played in it at the Union 
Square Theatre, this city. 
a • * 

E. E. B. — George M. Cohan established 
a name as a sketch writer before be waa 
nineteen years of age and wrote material 
for the Four Cohans, as well as for other 
prominent acts. 

• • • 

A. S. A. — Comparisons are odious. Da- 
vid Warfield, Otis Skinner, George Arliss 
and John Mason are, each in his line, 
great. As to which is the best, we must 
refuse to express an opinion. 

• • • 

A. M. A. — A good musical comedy is 
just as meritorious in its class as a good 
drama is in its class. No man could 
draw any comparison and If be did he 
would probably find that musical comedy 
had more admirers than the drama. 
a • * 

F. I. — F. F. Proctor had stock com- 
panies at the Fifth Avenue, the Fifty- 
eighth Street, and the One Hundred and 
Twenty-fifth Street theatres for several 
seasons.' He did not have stock at the 
Twenty-third Street. It was at this house 
many of New York's big successes were 
presented more than a quarter of a century 
ago. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Lydia Yeamans Titus waa playing the 
variety theatres. 

B. F. Keith contributed $500 to the Act- 
ors' Fund Fair. 

Maud Adams signed with John Drew's 
company. 

New Flays: "MiBS Roarer," "The Prin- 
cess of Erie," "The Voodoo," "Jupiter," 
"A White Elephant." 

Jule Keen was treasurer with Buffalo 
Bill. 

M. Witmark & Sons published "The 
Old Oak Chest," "A Letter to His Dad," 
"The Picture That la Turned Toward the 
Wall," "He Was a Pal of Mine" and Billy 
Jerome's "He Didn't Split the Wood." 

Cooke and Clinton were with Muldoon's 
Athletes and the Henry Burlesque Com- 
pany at Niblo's Garden, New York. 
, John D. Hopkins closed the tour of his 
Howard Atheneum Company. 



ROBLES THANKS FRIENDS 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir. — I want to thank yon and Teds 
Cupper for all yon have done for me. I 
want to thank the people in the burlesque 
profession for their kind help to me. 

I have received, to date, $674 from the 
traveling shows (burlesque) and no one 
realizes how it touches my feelings to think 
I have to acknowledge so many friends. 

I would like to hear from all of them 
and can be reached at this address, 712 
New Jersey Avenue, Brooklyn, N. X. 

Thanking you again, sincerely yours, 
Charles Robles. 



R1ALT0 RATTLES | 



ATTACKS HIGH PLAY ROYALTIES 

Editor, New Yobs Cupper: 

Dear Sir. — Why is it that stock is not 
up to the level it need to be? I have been 
a stock manager for fifteen years, and with 
that experience feel that I am qualified 
to say that it ia because of the high 
royalties charged by play brokers. 

Royalties charged for late releases are 
so exorbitant that it is becoming next to 
impossible to operate a stock company 
with any degree of profit and it is a won- 
der that stock is doing aa well as it is. 

Numerous stock companies have been 
forced to close because they could not 
afford to pay the price tor plays and I 
know that most of these companies were 
worthy of a better fate. 

Something onght to be done to relieve 
the situation and I suggest an organiza- 
tion of stock managers to protest against 
high royalties. 

I am closing my own company because 
I do not care to have all the proceeds 
of my work pour into the coffers of the 
play brokers. Yours truly, 

Selina, Ohio. J. B. Abbott. - 



WANTS TRUE PATRIOTISM 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

I am writing this letter to you in the 
hope that it will reach the eyes of per- 
formers, managers and publicity agenta 
for whom it is intended. I wish to make 
an appeal to the American actors to make 
them realize that the war is a very seri- 
ous matter, our flag a very sacred thing 
and patriotism something that cannot be 
trifled with. 

What has that to do with theatrical 
folk, you ask? I will show you. ' 

I realize that persons on the stage 
thrive on publicity. The more publicity 
they receive the better is their box-office 
drawing power. To obtain original pub- 
licity must be very hard, indeed: With 
the outbreak of the wax, newspaper space 
probably became even harder to break 
into with press agent yarns, except if they 
had to do with the war. And probably that 
is the reason that so many performers 
have resorted to cheap patriotism in an 
effort to secure newspaper and other pub- 
licity. 

We read of Laurette Taylor and others 
pleading for recruits. The cause is a 
wonderful one, but I, personally, cannot 
help but question their motives. I be- 
lieve that, in the case of Miss Taylor, the 
fact that she is appearing in a recruiting 
play has a lot to do with her stand, and 
that it was probably advised by a zealous 
press agent, who saw in it a good chance 
to. advertise the show. 

The advertisements of "Out There," 
with their plea to enlist, would be com- 
mendable if one could take them at their 
face value, but again we cannot help but 
think that it is merely a good means of 
advertising the production, and that the 
management is commercializing Uncle 
Sam. 

Managers and press agents should be 
brought to realize that in a national 
crisis there is something bigger than their 
show, and should stop waving Old Glory 
in an atmosphere of commercialism and 
fabrications. 

Also, while- passing, performers should 
refrain from making Billy allusions to the 
war upon the stage, from singing non- 
sensical war songs and from assuming 
any manner otherwise than is befitting to 
to a loyal, red-blooded patriot. 
Sincerely, 

Fred Maoos. 

Newark, N. J. 



RHYMED INTER VIEW NO. 5. 

There at his desk the whole day through, 
he aita with his shears and his paste, clip 
ping up jokes both old and new that will 
suit his clientele's taste. For Jokes that 
bring em ilea, he charges two bones; for 
jokes that bring grins, it is three; for 
jokes that bring tears or pitiful groans, 
be has a gratuitous fee. Jim Madison's 
pen writes a gag with each stroke in a 
truly original style, but it isn't the point 
of this or that joke that causes this gag- 
Bter to smile. The performers may think 
his jokes very funny, but he laughs his 
beet when he pockets their money. 

SINCE CHRISTMAS. 

They're cleaning up the bungalow; 

New paint is on the place. 
The cellar's clean, the grass looks green, 

It is a summer case. 
They've come back home to rest a while, 

Although they're now in debt. 
They spent it well, but gems can't tell 

That they're not paid for yet. 



LAW-LESS. 

After a long legal fight over "Within 
the Law," the Shuberts and Selwyni set- 
tled the matter without the aid of their 
attorneys. As they couldn't settle 
"Within the Law" with all the law they 
finally settled it without the law. 

FOUND: A NEW FORD GAG. 

H. B, Marinelli has presented his auto- 
mobile to the fire department of Park 
Ridge. Whether he is doing them a favor 
or whether they are doing him a favor 
depends upon whether it is a real car or 
a flivver. 



WALKER, DYER & FAYE. 

Our Sherlock Holmes has found out that 
the young lady who assists Dyer and 
Faye, but whose name never appears on 
the program will answer you if you hail 
her as Dorothy Walker. 

WHAT WOULD SUNDAY SAY? 

If your agent in the Pitnam building 
acted queerly when yon went to see him 
on Friday last, blame the Sheedy Agency. 
Champagne before lunch is bound to have 
its effect. 



SOLDIERS OF PEACE. 

With all this war talk, we haven't heard 
anything of the Clifton Crawford Guard 
of chorus men whose press agent painted 
them so brave — in times of peace. 

DRY WIT. 

Don't ever be surprised to hear that 
Rock and White have severed partnership. 
What other can one expect of White Rock 
than a split? 



WHAT HAS BECOME OF— •"*' 

The peace acts? 
The mother songs? 
The jokes about mother-in-law f 

A MATTER OF COURSE. 

Gene Greene canceled his route at the 
Palais Royal on account of the long jumps 
between courses. 



HOW ABOUT YOU? 

Any fellow who knows his own act well 
has little time to know the other fellow's. 

INVADERS! TO ARMSI 

Headline says "Chicago Opera Invading 
New. York." C*41 out the Home Guard. 

NOT MUCH OP A HOP. 

"The Grasshopper" has quit already. It 
bopped in and out in less than no time. 

JOLSON TO PLAY DECATUR 

Decatur, HL, April 23.— Owing to an 
open dste between St Louis and Kansas 
City, AI Jolson and his company in "Rob- 
inson, Crusoe, Jr." will play at the Lincoln 
Theatre, here, next Friday night, 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 



CONDON 



PARIS 



FOREIGN MEWS 



BERLIN 



SYDNEY 



LONDON AT A GLANCE 



Loudon, En*., April 14. 
Elston Hawthorne has joined the colors. 

Gillen was in Nottingham this week. 

Joy Wattle is playing provincial balls. 

"Morocco Bound" is about to be revived. 



The Three Morrellyg will be In town 
next week. 



Mabel Fercival is at the Paladium next 
week. 

Hal Smithers has been gazetted second 
lieutenant. 



Harpe and Harper are next week at 
Devonshire. 



Florrie Gallimore plays Salisbury week 
of April 23. 

Olive Wier is in her second week at 
the Pavilion. 



Cliff Ryland'a son, Cliff Goldin, has 
joined the colors. 

Rosa Hamel was at the Palace, Lei- 
cester, this week. 



Fits and Gerald were at the Palace, 
Grimsby, this week. 



Daisy Griff opens at the Empire, Grant- 
ham, next Monday. 

Betancourt was at the Hippodrome, 
Woolwich, this week. 

The Two Kortinis played the Pavilion, 
Liverpool, this week. 

A woman is electrician at the Queen's 
Theatre, Ramsgate. 



Lorman Lang-ford, of the Comedy Duo, 
is fighting in France. 

Carrie Kasrac has recovered from her 
four months' illness. 



Ruby Reeve, sister of Ada Reeve, will 
soon be seen in revue. 



Hetty King sends word she is doing 
finely on the Moss tonr. 



George F. Ford was at the Theatre 
Royal, Dublin, this week. 

W. Buchanan Taylor has sold his in- 
terest in the V. B. O. T.td. 



Phyllis and Giles goes to the Lyric, Liv- 
erpool, next Monday week. 



Geo 
West 



Hylton played the Olympia, 
mwich, this week. 



Gladys Linger has written a new play 
entitled "Mr. Hepplewhite." 



The Two De Breana were at the Hip- 
podrome, Bristol, this week. 

Harry Blake will be seen in a forth- 
coming West End production. 

Grossmith and Lanrillard are about to 
acquire a West End theatre. 

The Phil Ascot Four closes tonight a 
good week at the Palladium. 



Jimmie Lancaster is now stage manager 
at the King's Theatre, Dundee. 

Edith Cairns closes tonight a successful 
week at the Coliseum, Oldham. 



Henry A. Moore, monologist, is booked 
for a tour of the L. T. V. halls. 

Cooper and Barnes will play the Pal- 
ace, Warminster, week after next. 



Edith Evans is the music hall's most 
recent recruit from musical circles. 



Vladimir Brodo closes tonight & success- 
ful week at the Alhambra, Barnsley. 

Signor and Madam Borelli were this 
week at the Hippodrome, Shoreham. 

Syd McLoyd, of the Two McLoyds, has 
received his discharge from the army. 

Bert Snowdon writes from "somewhere 
in France" that he is now a sergeant. 

Returning to the halls, Hillier and 
Haynes will present "Mending the Door." 



Jack Delaine, who has been appearing 
as Earle Foxke, has resumed his old name. 



Fred Louin, now Private F. Withy, has 
been invalided home from the Baiiran 
front. 



Harry Balcon closes tonight a good 
week at the Imperial Palace, Canning 
Town. 



George Hurte, late of Sims and Hurts, 
is stationed at the R. N. Barracks, Ports- 
mouth. 

Gerald Montgomery has been appointed 
resident manager of the Hippodrome, Ac- 
crington, 

Cecil H. Collison has been appointed 
general manager of the Alhambra. 
Barnsley. 

J. E. Tumber has succeeded George A. 
HiggB as general manager of the Empire, 
Chatham. 



"Love for Love" will be given by the 
Stage Society tomorrow and Monday 
afternoons. 



Harry Ray, in his laughing success, 
"Find the Lady," returns to London week 
after next. 



Sonia Seal plays the Pavilion, Glasgow, 
next week and follows with a week at 
North Shields. 



"Romance,'' which hud off during Holy 
Week, resumed last Monday aid fi back 
in its old stride. 



Jack E. Knowles, the Lancashire co- 
median, writes to let us know he is at 
the French front. 



Billy Walton, bow Private Green, is in 
a London hospital, suffering from wounds 
received in France. 



Dave Godfrey, the comedy musician, is 
training with the Lincoln Regiment, 
somewhere in England. 



Owing to illness Tom Nelson was 
obliged to leave the cast of Florrie Fordo's 
revue "Midnight Revels." 



The Sisters Sprightly, with Karno'a re- 
vue, "All Women," were at the Empire, 
Finsbury Park, this week. 



Latest advices from South Africa give 
the information that Geo. H. B. Fobs died 
there from malarial fever. 



George Baines and John Coatea, the 
operatic tenor, are members of a concert 
party in the French trenches. 



The Messrs. Samuelson are negotiating 
with wee Georgie Wood for his services, 
a lead in several feature film productions. 



Henry Gardner has succeeded Aubrey 
Kennett as musical director of the Pal- 
ace, Chelsea. Kennett has joined the 
navy. 



Jock Mills and Myra Norman have their 
new act in good running order, and favor- 
able reports reach us concerning its re- 
ception. 

"Petticoats" is to go on tour, as the 
management believe it will make good on 
the road in spite of the fact it did not 
draw in London. 



J. F. Elliston, of the Grand and Theatre 
Royal, Bolton, has recovered from his re- 
cent indisposition, and has resumed his 
managerial duties. 

Jimmy McKinnon, acting manager of 
-the Hippodrome, Greeneck, and wife, Flo 
Sutton, are rejoicing over the recent ar- 
rival of a baby girL 

Eily O'Donohoe, a young actress with 
the "Chu Chin Chow" company at His 
Majesty's, is to be married to Lieuten- 
ant A. G. Fenn on April 19. 

Linden and Berridge, after a week of 
pleasure seeking, resume work next Mon- 
day at the Royal, Edinburgh, with the 
Electric, Falkirk, to follow. 



John T. Watchom, assistant manager 
of the Empire, Hackney, has been ap- 
pointed a Life Governor of the Metropoli- 
tan Hospital, Kingsland Road. 

H. O. Wardle, of Wardle and Phillips, 
who was wounded in action on the 
Somme, is in the first Western General 
Hospital, Fazakerley, Liverpool. 



John and William Carmody, late of the 
Hengler Brothers, are still in training, 
John -with the machine gun corps and Wil- 
liam with the Yorkshire regiment. 

G. V. Miller is the new assistant man- 
ager of the Empire, Nottingham. He was 
assistant manager of a London music hall 
when he was only seventeen years of age. 

Arthur Bourchier intends to -produce 
the late John N. Raphael's playlet "Be- 
tween Twelve and Three" in the halls. 
Miss Kyrle Bellew will play the leading 
role. 



The cast of Maurice Bertram's revue 
"No Thanks" includes Frank Vant, Jack 
Hayden, Amy Radcliffe, Ivy Richardson, 
the Delmar 'Sisters, Kitty Scott and A. 
Walton. 



Jack Perry writes that among the other 
performers in his regiment are George 
Boyd of the Boy da; Jack Knox, of Good- 
all and Knox; Josh Dixon and Jack Cole, 
of Cole and Ragi. 

Arthur R. Lewis, who was badly wound- 
ed on the Somme last October, is in the 
Parkfield Red Cross Hospital, Middleton 
Road, Crumpsall, Manchester. He is pro- 
gressing favorably. 

Jack Pearae is recovering from shrap- 
nel wounds received in action. Jack is a 
brother of Manager W. 8. Pearse, of the 
Palace, Bath, and is himself well known 
in music hall circles. 



MARIE LOHR TO VISIT U. S. 
London, Eng., April IX. — Arrange- 
ments are under way whereby Marie Lohr 
may go to America. Unless present plana 
miscarry, she will appear in "Remnant" 
when that play is presented in New York, 
playing the role in which she is now scor- 
ing a triumph at the Royalty here. 



AMERICA TO SEE "THREE CHEERS'* 
London, Eng., April 19. — J, U Sachs, 
one of the producers of "Three Cheers," 
the Shaftesbury success, is arranging to 
sail for America to present that play in 
New York. He also intends bringing back 
several American plays for production 
hen. 



LIKES "WONDERFUL JANE" 

London, Eng., April 21. — "Wonderful 
Jane," the new Louis Parker-Murray Car- 
son play, which was presented last week 
at the Garriek, seems to have won public 
favor. Marion Terry and Herbert Waring 
have the leading roles. 



"GENERAL POST" FOR AMERICA 

London, Eng., April 19.— Negotiations 
for the American rights to "General Post" 
have about been completed. The Aus- 
tralian rights have been disposed of. The 
play is packing the Haymarket, giving nine 
performances a week. 



PAVLOWA SAILS FOR BRAZIL 

Colon, Panama, April 21. — Pavlowa, 
the Russian dancer, who played a suc- 
cessful season here, has sailed for 
Buenos Aires where she will begin on 
April 30 a long tour of South America. 

AMERICA TO SEE VERA PEARCE 

Sydney, Aub., April 9. — Vera Pearce. 
"Queen of the Tivoli Follies," has signed 
a contract with Hugh D. Mcintosh 
whereby she will visit America before the 
end of 1917 under his management. 



KIMBALL RENEWS CONTRACT. 

Sydney, Aus., April 22. — Louis Kimball, 
known for his work in "Under Fire," "The 
House of Glass," "Common Clay" and 
other plays, has renewed his contract with 
the J. C. Williamson, Ltd. 



"ROTTERS" RIGHTS SETT LED 

London, Eng., April 22. — The Chancery 
Division in Manchester has decided that 
the touring rights of "The Rotters," 
Maltby's successful comedy, belong to 
Arthur Gibbons. 



BARRIE TURNS PRODUCER 

London, Eng., April 19. — James M. Bar- 
rie will produce his new one-act play, "The 
Old' Lady Shows Her Medals." This will 
be the first time in his career that he has 
turned producer. 



ACTS FROM U. S. SCORE SUCCESS 

Sydney, Aus., April 2L — The Mayos, 
Lonzo Oox and Frank Marckley, recent 
arrivals, opened on the Mcintosh Circuit 
here, to big success. They are booked for 
the full tour. 



VETERAN ACTOR DIES 

Sydney, Aus., April 19. — 'Harry Bracy, 
veteran actor and singer, is dead, aged 
seventy years. Three years ago he re- 
tired from the position of manager for J. C. 
Williamson. 



ADA REEVE IN AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne, Ans., April 7.— Ada Reeve, 
with her own special road company, Is 
appearing with pronounced success, at the 
Tivoli under direction of Hugh D. Mc- 
intosh. 



JAMES WELCH DEAD 

London, Eng., April 18. — James Welch, 
the wen-known comedian, died at Ms home 
here last week, aged fifty-one years. 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




NANCY BOYER 

OPENING 

STOCK 



TO CO-STAR WITH CHATTERDON 

Battle Cheek, Mich., April 21. — After 
being separated for a period of five years, 
Nancy Boyer and Arthur Ohatterdon will 
co-star under the management of Henry 
Testa, for a Spring and Summer season in 
stock here, opening tomorrow at the Post 
Theatre with "Arms and the GirL" "Mrs. 
Dot" will follow. The bill will be changed 
twice a week. 

Miss Boyer and Mr. Ohatterdon are 
very popular in Battle Greek, having ap- 
peared at the head of their own companies 
in this vicinity. Miss Boyer played all last 
season as a star on the International Cir- 
cuit. She and her husband, Henry Testa, 
Mr. Ohatterdon, accompanied by Mrs. 
Chatterdon, Jane Tarr and other members 
of the company, arrived here from New 
York last week and immediately began 
rehearsals at the Poet Theatre. 

Their company includes many people who 
have been with them in previous seasons, 
and consists of Alma Powell, Jane Tarr, 
Lucy Leveque, Nellie Tarr, Mrs. Jacobs, 
Ida Elliot, Daniel Lawlor, Walter Davis, 
Henry Testa, Edwin Clayton, Clifford 
Hyde, Willard Robinson, Edward Cole, Joe 
Jacobs and Bohert Wood, scenic artist. 

Miss Boyer and Mr. Ohatterdon will 
play a limited engagement in Battle Greek, 
after which they will move to another 
Michigan city, presenting the latest comedy 
releases. 



ERNIE MARKS CO. CLOSING 

Meafobd, Out., April 21.— The Ernie 
Marks Stock Company is in its thirty- 
fourth week and will close the present 
season about May 26. The show has con- 
fined itself to Canadian territory all this 
season. Mr. Marks Intends to strengthen 
his show in many respects next season car- 
rying a carload of special scenery, also 
special feature vaudeville acts. 

The roster includes Ernie Marks, pro- 
prietor and manager ; Kittle Marks, leads ; 
Norbert E. Dorente, D. E. Benn, Neil Ben- 
zie, Clara Bell Prae, Nettie Gray, Edna 
Durand, Albert Perrin. Fred Durand, Geo. 
A. Fox and Geo. Brough, agent. When 
the show doses Mr. and Mrs. Marks, after 
their return from New York, where they 
intend to spend a few weeks, will go to 
their summer borne, "Fair Haven," Chris- 
ties' Lake, Ontario. 



CHANGES IN PATERSON CO. 

Paterson, N. J., April 29. — Several 
changes have been made with the Wini- 
fred St. Claire Co., at the St. Claire The- 
atre here. Herbert De Guerre has suc- 
ceeded Morris Burr, who is enjoying a 
well earned vacation. Leonore Phelps is 
playing the roles of Nola Mercer, who is 
the new leading lady. , 

MISS WORTH'S MOTHER ILL 

Cleveland, O., April 21. — While work- 
ing in stock at Chicago,- Josephine Worth 
was called to the bedside of her mother 
at Cleveland. , She has helped to nurse 
her through a severe illness and as her 
mother has almost entirely recovered she 
will soon -be able to resume her stock 
work. J 



WHITWORTH SISTERS AT HOME 

Middi.itowk, O., April 21. — The Whlt- 

worth Sisters, since closing with the Geo- 
Butler Co.. have been visiting friends in 
Ohagrim Falls, O.. and are now at their 
home here, preparing for the coming sea- 



NORTHAMPTON PLAYERS CLOSING 

Nobtiiampton, Mass., April 23. — This 
is the finai week for the Northampton 
Players at the Academy of Music, the 
closing attraction being "Milestones." Jes- 
sie Bonatelle and Bertram Harrison have 
resigned their directorship to take effect 
at the end of the season. The trustees 
will give the people an opportunity to 
vote whether the theatre should be con- 
tinued as a municipal house or allow it to 
be taken over by private interests. 



NEW COMPANY FOR GRAND O. H. 

A new stock company will open at the 
Grand Opera House, Brooklyn, next Mon- 
day, headed by Noel Travers and Irene 
Douglas. They have recently completed 
two years as headliners over the Orpheum 
circuit in "Meadowbrook Lane." Among 
the members of their company are Harry 
Maitland, Walter Tenner, Louise Langdon, 
Florence Johns and Basil Buck. "Hit-tbe- 
Trail Holliday" will be the opening at- 
traction. 



CORSE PAYTON CO. OPENS 

The Corse Payton Stock Co. opened its 
engagement at the Lexington Theatre 
Tuesday afternoon, with "Hit-the-Trail 
Holliday." The cast includes, besides Mr. 
Payton, Leslie Baaaett, J. K. Hutchinson, 
Kalman Ma tun, Ernest Lynda, Louis Gor- 
don, Harry B. McKee, T. J. Maren, Syd- 
ney Mary, Bobby LivingBton, Bert Farni- 
ington, Karl Amend, Jno. Meyerfeld, 
Franceses Rolati and Mary Hill. 



BLAIN TO OPEN SASKATOON CO. 

Saskatoon, Can., April 21. — James 
Blain, who has lately been identified with 
the Oliver Eckhardt Players and the W. 
B. Sherman interests, will bring a stock 
'company to Saskatoon May 24 to open a 
permanent summer engagement at the Em- 
pire Theater. Mr. Blain is now in Chi- 
cago engaging his people. The Empire 
Theatre is on TJ. V. M. A. Circuit but 
suspends vaudeville for the summer. 

INDIANAPOLIS TO HAVE STOCK 

Indianapolis, Ind., April 21. — The 
Stuart Walker Players are planning to 
open a stock season at the Murat Theatre, 
May 14, with "It Pays to Advertise" as 
the opening bill. The players will consist 
mainly of the actors and actresses who 
appeared here in Stuart Walker's Port- 
manteau Theatre. The productions will be 
staged and directed by Mr. Walker. 



BLISS JOINS DENVER CO. 
Toledo, O., April 21. — After a stay of 
twelve weeks with the Wadsworth Stock 
Co. at the Palace Theatre, James A. Bliss 
doses tonight and will start immediately 
for Denver, where he opens April 29 at the 
Denham Theatre with O. D. Woodward. 



MARJORIE FOSTER IN ST. LOUIS 

St. Loots, April 21. — Marjorie Foster 
joined the Players at the Players Theatre 
Monday for the last two weeks of their 
engagement. She succeeded Olive Temple- 
ton, who is returning to New York. 



ST. LOUIS CO. CLOSING SOON 

St. Loins, April 21. — The Players, at 
the Players Theatre, did not close their 
engagement last Saturday as announced 
bnt decided to continue for two weeks 
more. They will close next week. 



SIOUX CITY STOCK CLOSING 

Sioux Ornr, la., April 22. — The stock 
company at the Grand Opera House will 
close its engagement Saturday and the 
players will return to New York. 

MISS ST. CLAIRE GETS THEATRE 

Philadelphia. Pa., April 23. — Wini- 
fred St. Claire has leased a theatre here, 
where she will shortly Install a stock 
company. 



BONSTELLE CO. 

OPENING 

MAY 14 

TO PLAY 9 WEEKS IN DETROIT 

Detroit, April 22.— Jessie Bonatelle, 
who has been associated all season, aa di- 
rector, with the Northampton Players, at 
the Academy of Music, Northampton, 
Mass., will sever her connection with that 
organisation at the conclusion of its sea- 
son, April 28, and devote all her time 
to the organizing of her own company, 
which opens here May 14. 

This will make Miss Bona t tile's ninth 
season in this city and the engagement 
win be for nine weeks. 

It has been the custom of Miss Bon- 
atelle in previous seasons to devote at 
least one week of her season to the pro- 
duction of a Shakespearean play. She has 
received numerous requests from educa- 
tional institutions to do so this year, and 
the Board of Education has pledged its 
support If the company will present a 
Shakespeare play which the school chil- 
dren have been studying. It is likely Miss 
Bonatelle will accede to these requests if 
she gets the backing of the board. The 
play will be decided on later. 

Besides being manager of the company, 
Miss Bonstelle plays the leading roles, 
with Corliss Giles as her leading man. 
He has been with her company for five 
years and is at present appearing in 
"Mother Carey's Chickens." The sup- 
porting company will include William 
Pringle for character roles. This will 
make his seventh season with her com- 
pany. He baa been leading man of the 
Northampton Players all sesson. Cora 
Witberspoon has been engaged as second 
woman. Hugh Dfllman for light comedy 
and juvenile roles, Franklin Pangborn. 
Wnbelmina Wilkes, Adams Rice,' stage 
manager, and Seymonr D. Parker, scenic 
artist Miss Wilkes has directed her 
brothers' companies on the coast and is 
now director of the Northampton Players. 
Because of the scarcity of stock plays 
and the consequent rise ' in royalties 
charged for late releases. Miss Bonstelle 
promises to try out several new ideas. Four 
one-act plays will be produced and a ro- 
mantic light opera, on which Miss Bon- 
stelle has been working with the libret- 
tist all season, will be given a try-out. 
An Oriental play will also be given a 
production. 

While the opening play has not yet 
been decided upon, it is probable that 
either "Shirley Kaye" or "Divoroons" will 
be the initial attraction/ 

At the conclusion of its season here, 
the company goes to Buffalo, where it' 
opens its twelfth season in that city the 
latter part of July. 



SAVIDGE PLAYERS OPEN SOON 
Watwb, Neb.. April 21.— The Walter 
Savidge Players, in connection with the 
Savidge Carnival, opens here May ft in 
their own portable summer theatre. Their 
repertoire includes "On Parole." "Fine 
Feathers." "Pair of Sixes." "Big Jim Gar- 
rity." "The Shenherd of the Hills." "Little 
Southern Girl." nnd "Traffic in Souls." 



PRICE CO. IN GRAND RAPIDS 

Grand Rapids. Mich.. April 21. — The 
Columbia Stock Co. at the Colombia 
Theatre has been succeeded by the Stanley 
Price Stock Co. Edwin Felix and Blanche 
Bowers are in the cast. 



BILLY CUNNINGHAM OPENS CO. 

Frostbuuo, Md., April 23. — Billy Cun- 
ningham and his own company opened the 
Spring season at Keyser, W. Va., Easter 
Monday and is playing week stands 
through Maryland and W. Va., until July, 
when the company opens in permanent 
stock at one of the New England parks. 
Mr. Cunningham carries all special scen- 
ery and is producing all royalty bills. 
The cast is headed by Mr. Cunningham 
and Helen Forest Russell, supported by 
J «ck P. Stack, J. Arthur Herbert, Joseph 
H. Slater, Jack Murphy, George Stevens, 
Georgianna King, Dorothy Russell, Kath- 
erine Bauer, Mrs. C. Walcott Russell and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gay. The company 
is under the management of H. A. Todd. 

ROBINS ENGAGES CAST 

Toronto, Can., April 23.— Edward 
Booms, who will open his fifth summer 
stock season here early in May, will have 
for his leading woman Virginia Fox 
Brooks. Thomas Jackson, Helen Travers, 
Eugene Fraaier, Franceses Botoli, Baker 
Moore and Robert Knight will be in the 
supporting cast. During the season Mr. 
Robins will present a new play, which 
Mrs. Harris will produce in New York 
next season, and three other new produc- 
tions. 



NEWARK CO. TOSTAY 10 WEEKS 

Newark, N. J., April 21.— The new 
Orpheum Stock Co., under the management 
of Jay Packard, which opened an engage- 
ment here last Saturday, will remain for 
ten weeks. Alice Fleming and Dud'ey 
Ayres are seen in the leading roles, sup- 
ported by Carolyn Friend, Louise Wright, 
Minnie Stanley, Mary Farney, G. B. Lof- 
tus, Franklyn Munnell, Eugene Desmond, 
G. Edwards Paul, Harold Cook, Claude 
Miller, Will Hastings and J. P. Harrison. 

WOODWARD OPENING DENVER CO. 

Denver, April 21.— O. D. Woodward 
will open a new stock company at the 
Denham Theatre next Wednesday in "The 
Co-Kespondent." William David will be 
the leading man, and in the company are 
Clara Louis Moore, Gilberts Faust, Chan- 
ning Hare, Sydney Riggs and Murray 
Bernard. 



BABY GIRL TO PRESTONS 

Fitchbubo, Mass., April 23.— A daugh- 
ter, Edith Janet, was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank H. Preston (Edith Waddell) April 

I.. at J?*. 1 ? home here - Mr - Preston and 
Mian Waddell were last with the Progres- 
sive Pleyers. 



STOCK OPENS IN FREEPORT 

Freeport, 111., April 21.— The Clyde Call- 
cutt Stock Co. opened an engagement here 
thla week with a cast including Brandon 
Peters, Helen Keyes, Gladys Perry, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Foster. 

CHRISTY TO JOIN BOSTON CO. 

Boston, April 28.— Hamilton Christy, 
who is appearing In "Peg O' My Heart," 
will shortly leave to Join the stock com- 
psny at the Grand Theatre May 15. 

MISS LATHAM IN ROCHESTER CO. 

Rochester, N. Y., April 21.— Cynthia 
Latham haa been engaged to play lngenn* 
roles with the Manhattan Players at the 
Lyceum Theatre, opening Monday. 



JOIN PAUL BRADY PLAYERS 

Barbibton, O.. April 23.— Gavin 
Dorothy and wife, Bessie Hawthorne, will 
open here with Paul Brady's Players 
May t. 



ENGAGED FOR CIRCUIT STOCK 

Florence Kean and Joseph Cameron 
have been engaged for Mont Holland's cir- 
cuit stock company. 



DAVENPORT CO. ENLARGES 

Davenport, la., April 22. — Percy Kil- 
bride, Vldan Mareeno and Dolly Temple 
have been engaged for the Lyric Stock Co. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 




FERARI SHOWS 

OPEN SEASON 

SATURDAY 

ELYRIA CHOSEN FOR EVENT 



Elyria. O., April 23. — The CoL Francis 
Ferari Shows will open their season Sat- 
urday on the streets of Elyria, It being the 
first carnival to be allowed to use the 
streets in Beveral years. 

The attractions with the show this sea- 
son wffl include: CoL Ferari's Trained 
Wild Animal Arena, Anderson's Dancing 
Equines, Wallace's Monkey Speedway, 
Steam's Dreamland Side Shows, Schiller's 
Pigmy Tillage, Steam's Jungle Show, 
Doke's Hindoo Mystery, Abergasfs Silo- 
drome, Smith's Katsenjammer Kastle. 
Smith's Submarine, Smith's Whip, Smith's 
Merry-Go-Round, Smith's Ferris Wheel, 
Wambold's Dogs, Ponies and Monkeys, 
and a platform show. 

The entire outfit has been rebuilt and 
repainted. There will be eighteen can 
used to transport the shows this year, 
twelve flat can, three coaches and two box 
cars making up the equipment 

The executive staff remains the same as 
in previous seasons and is as follows: 
CoL Francis Ferari Shows, Inc., propri- 
etors; W. L. (BUI) Wyatt, general man- 
ager; Geo. H. Coleman, general represen- 
tative: Van O. Diver, special agent; Har- 
ry Sutherland, special agent ; Robert How- 
ard, press agent, Robert Haid, lithograph- 
er; Carl Turnquist, general superintend- 
ent: Johnnie Wallace, superintendent con- 
cessions; Bill Harder, train master; Dan- 
nv 0*Kieff, superintendent elephants, and 
Wm. Purchase, superintendent of animals. 

Capt. Wm. Purchase, Charles Bernard!, 
Curley James. Madam Bernard! and Prin- 
cess Alice are the animal trainers on the 
Ferari Trained Wild Animal Arena this 
season. 

From here the shows go to Sandusky, 
where they will exhibit one week and then 
go on to Columbus. 



TRAINER ATTACKED BY BEAR 

Aiaentown, N. J- April 21. — Louis 
Lonlti. a well-known animal trainer with 
the Cook Circus, is hovering between life 
and death at a hospital in Trenton, suf- 
fering from terrible injuries as a result 
of n cinnamon bear attacking him while 
the animal was tied to a tree at the 
show's Winter. quarters near here. Louiti 
was trrine to remove a can of molasses 
which had been given to the bear by an- 
other emplovee of the cirons when the at- 
tack took place. 



SAVTOCE SHOW OPENS MAY 9 

Wayne. Neb.. April 21.— The Walter 
Savidge - Amusement Co. opens its season 
here May 9. Among the attractions with 
the show are Viola's Bird Circus, the Os- 
trich Farm, the Kangaroo, the Submarine. 
the Merry-Go-Round. Ferris Wheel and 
three free acts daily. Walter Savidge is 
manager of the carnival and A1 C. Wilson 
assistant manager and director. 



ST. LOUIS NEXT FOR RINGLINGS 

Chicago, April 24. — The Ringling Bro- 
thers circus will remain at the Coliseum 
until next Sunday night, April 29. At the 
conclusion of the Chicago engagement the 
show win at once be transported to St. 
Louis, where it makes its first stand under 
canvas, Tuesday, May 1, and remaining 
five days. The show win then head for 
the East. 



WICHITA FALLS PLANS FAIR 

Wichita Falls, Tex., April 21.— A 
$50,000 fair association is being organized 
here to hold its first exhibition next fall. 



RINGLING CAR ROSTER ENGAGED 

Chicago, April 23. — The roster of Oar 
No. 1 of Ringling Brothers' circus for the 
season is as follows: George W. Good- 
hart, car manager; Tom Connors, boss 
billposter; Henry Mahler, Harry Foster, 
Paul Marr, F. A. CampbeU, O. A. Wha- 
lon, S. B. McDonongh, Fred Howarth, 
George Orth, Ed Schmidt, G. BL Pritchard, 
Fred Tewkesbury, N. J. Nary, George 
Wachter and Edward Ebling, billposters. 
Robert Emerick is in charge of litho- 
graphs with Fred Ferry, Harry Varner, 
Abraham Newburger and S. H. Webb. 
Harry Bechtoid la car porter, and F. A. 
Campbell is steward of the car. Bert T. 
HulL of Pittsburgh, is accompanying the 
car as program solicitor, and James F. 
Donalson, the contracting press agent, is 
also working from the car this season. 



SAN ANTONIO HAS FIESTA 

San Anton ia, Tex., April 20. — The San 
Antonio Fiesta began Monday and win 
continue until Satarday, inclusive. The 
C. A. Wortham shows are furnishing the 
shows for the Fiesta, having just come 
oat of their quarters at San Antonio, and 
have added many new features to the 
show. The Worthan Shows have ex- 
pended more than $75,000 this season in 
improvements, new structures and devices, 
and practically aU of the materials are 
made here. 



BANKER JOINS SHOWMEN ASS'N 

Chicago, April 23. — Nelson Lambert, 
vice-president of the Fort Dearborn Na- 
tional Bank, joined the National Outdoor 
Showmen's Association last week. It ia 
deemed advisable to have a banker in the 
organization .because of exchange negotia- 
tions, even though Lambert is not actively 
identified with the show business. 



WORLD WONDER SHOWS OPENING 

Springfield, O., April 21.— The World 
Wonder Show open their season here to- 
day. P. R. Russell is manager of the 
show and CoL I. N. Fiak is general agent, 
with Eddie Owens in charge of the train. 



SOLOMON TO TAKE OUT SHOW 

Leatkbtwobth, Kan., April 21. — It is 
rumored that S. Solomon, who recently 
sold his interest in the Sol's and Rubin's 
Shows, wfll shortly take out a show from 
the Parker factory. 



MME. MARANTETTE WITH CIRCUS 

Akbon, O., April 22. — The Madam 
Marantette combination of high school 
horses and the high jumping horse St. 
Patrick, will be with Ed. Arlington this. 
season. 



WAR POSTPONES CENTENNIAL 

Milton, Pa.. April 21. — Plana for the 
centennial, which was to have been held 
in this city, have been temporarily 
abandoned on account of the war. 



DUNN OPERATED UPON . . 

Savannah, Ga., April 22. — James T. 
Dunn, who has trooped with many carni- 
vals, is confined in a hospital here, having 
undergone an operation. . 



ENGEL RESTING IN NEW YORK 

S. A. EngeL who has had several con- 
cessions with the Con T. Kennedy Shows, 
has returned to New York and intends to 
rest for about a month. 



WATTES JOIN CIRCUS 

Chicago, April 21. — Australian Waites 
left Chicago last week for Indianapolis, 
Ind., where they opened with the Hagen- 
beck-Wallace circus. 



THONETS SHOW OPENS 

Braddock, Pa., April 2L— The Great 
Excelsior Shows, Joe Tbonefs caravan, 
opened here last Thursday. 



BARNUM CIRCUS 

SHOWS FOR 

SICKFOLK 

GIVES PERFORMANCE AT HOSPITAL 



Saturday morning was a gala day for 
the patients of the Bdlevue Hospital, New 
York, when the Barnum & Bailey Circus 
made its annual visit there. 

About 1,400 .patients, children and 
grown-ups, witnessed the performance 
and were made happy by the antics of 
the fnnmakers. They viewed the show 
from the balconies and an improvised 
grandstand of benches in the courtyard of 
the Administration Building. 

Thirteen of the best acts which Alf T. 
Ringling brings to the city annually made 
up the program. A dozen downs, led by 
Mertens, made a triumphal entry and 
opened the performance with their gloom - 
dispelling stunts. Maude Dorie's cabaret 
dogs followed and MertenB and the arena 
clowns came on again and gave acro- 
batic feats on a big red carpet on the 
sidewalk. 

The human kangaroo, MacAleavey , 
next twisted himself into various shapes, 
and Moser's comedy mule also enter- 
tained. The Chinese acrobats sad more 
clowns, Prince and Solomon, a pole act, 
a comedy and acrobatic act and more 
clowns and more acrobats performed un- 
til the finale by the band of clowns. 

The performers came to the hospital in 
four big automobile Tans followed by 
the animals. Throngs of poor children 
from the East Side were attracted by the 
procession and many were given admit- 
tance to the hospital grounds and allowed 
to Bee the show. 

This is the last week of the circus at 
Madison Square Garden. The next stand 
is Philadelphia, where it opens next 
Monday. 



CARNIVAL DATE EXTENDED 

Tebbt. Haute, Ind., April 21. — The 
Company B Carnival opened here last 
Saturday with the Famous Dixie Shows. 
Bad weather and the delay of several at- 
tractions have prompted the management 
to extend the dates to April 28, the Clinton, 
Ind., date, of 23 to 28, being canceled. 



ORPHANS SEE SPECIAL CIRCUS 

The Barnum & Bailey Circus enter- 
tained the orphan children of New York 
City at a special performance yesterday 
morning at 10 o'clock. The entire amphi- 
theatre was turned over to the children, 
as there was not room enough at any 
matinee. 



DELAVOYE GIVES GOVT. FARM 

Chicago, April 2L-"— Wm Delavoye, 
principal and producing down with the 

Sells-FIoto Circus, has turned over his 
eighty-six-acre farm on Pensacola Bay, 
Fla., to the government for army or navy 
purposes. 



DONNAR AGAIN WITH H. W. BAND 

Tebbe Haute, Ind., April 21. — Edward 
Donnar, of Oaktown, will be with the 
Hagenback- Wallace Circus band again this 
season as tuba player. This makes his 
third season with the show. 



LAMIS BUYS PARK PROPERTY 
Macon, Ga., April 21. — James Lamis 
has purchased the site containing Lake- 
wood Lake, and is converting the land into 
an amusement resort, to be known as 
Macon's White City. 



HERSHEY WITH SELLS-FLOTO 

LewHershev. the Frog Man. wfll be 
seen "with the Sells-FIoto Shows this com- 
ing 



REICH AND GOODMAN COMBINE 
Sam Reich and Max Goodman have 
combined and will handle a string of con- 
cessions this season. Their company has 
been incorporated under the name of the 
Goodman Concession Co. They have al- 
ready booked quite a few of the large 
celebrations and fairs. 



NEW OMAHA PARK OPENING 

Omaha, Neb., April 21. — Lakeview, the 
site formerly occupied by the T. M. C. A. 
summer camp, is Omaha's newest amuse- 
ment park and wffl be opened early in 
Jnnc. J. W. and H. F. Munchhoff, who 
operated Krug Park last season, win be 
the managers. 



WON'T CARRY CIRCUSES 

Knoxvtlle, Tenu., April 20.— On ac- 
count of the heavy movement of traffic and 
the prospects of still further heavier move- 
ment on account of war conditions the 
Southern Railway lines wffl not contract 
for movement of circuses or midway shows 
in. the future. 



WANTS CODY STATUE ERECTED 

Washington, D. O., April 23. — A bill 
has been introduced in Congress providing 
an. appropriation of $50,000 for an eques- 
trian statue of William Frederick Cody 
(Buffalo Bill) to be erected in Cody, Wyo. 
The dty wffl donate the site. 



INCORPORATE BUFFALO PARK 

Buffalo, N. Y., April 23. — Carnival 
Court Park ' was incorporated last week 
into the Carnival Court Park Co. with a 
capital stock of $5,000. John T. Sherlock, 
Ellen R. Sherlock and John M. Ryan are 
the incorporators. 



SILVER PARK OPENING Di JUNE 

Crystal, Mich., April 21. — The Silver 
Family Park and Theatre here will be 
opened about June 1. One of the circus 
tents wiH be used as an aixdome, in which 
stock and traveling companies wffl be 
played. 



FAT GIRL SERIOUSLY ILL 

Washington, D. C, April 21. — Baby 
Trixie, fat girl, who was booked for this 
season with Cook Bros.' Circus, is seriously 
01 in a hospital here, suffering from cancer 
of the stomach and liver trouble. 



ROBINSON WOULD SERVE GOVT. 

John G. Robinson, of the Robinson Cir- 
cus, has tendered his services to the 
Government and his name has been en- 
rolled on the list of reserves for the 
quartermaster's department. 



MAYOR HONORS PARK MAN 

Boston, April 23. — John T. Benson, 
manager of the Nortunbega and . Lexing- 
ton Parks, has been appointed by Mayor 
Curley as a member of the Boston Safety 
Department 



AKRON BARS CARNIVALS 

. Akbon, O.. April 23. — No Carnivals 
wffl be allowed to play this dty in the fu- 
ture, but they can play Kenmore and 
Cuydhoga Falls, O., suburban towns to 
Akron. 



EARL PLACES ACT WITH LAGG 

Charles T. Earl has dosed contracts. to 
place his diving act, Six Diving Nymphs, 
with the Colonel Lagg Greater Shows this 
season. 



McINTOSH OFFICE TO CLOSE 

The New York office of Hugh Mcin- 
tosh, located in the Strand Theatre 
Building, wffl be closed at the end of this 
month, and Robert E. Catley, the gen- 
eral manager, will sail from San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on May 9. According 
to present plans, the office is to be dis- 
continued for the summer only, and will 
reopen in a new location in the fall. 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



IS 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 

WAR SCARES 

CHICAGO 

PARKS 



OWNERS FEAR CUT IN BUSINESS 

Chicago outdoor amusement park man- 
agers have a new problem to face this 
summer in addition to the old ones of 
bad weather and attractions. This is the 
war which they fear will cut into their 
business considerably. 

The war is causing them a great deal 
of concern, and they are practicing cau- 
tion while the government is appealing to 
people to practice economy. They feel 
that one of the first things economized on 
will be outdoor amusements. 

While every effort is being made to 
keep the standard of the attractions as 
high as possible, there is a noticeable re- 
luctance on their part to risk much upon 
super-attractions. All features which en- 
tail too much expense and which, thereby, 
diminish or make doubtful their chance 
for being of direct material, benefit, will 
be discarded. 

The band features will be played up 
bigger than ever, because bands natural- 
ly respond to the patriotic inclination of 
patrons. Fireworks also respond to war 
sentiments, but there has been so much 
competition between the leading manu- 
facturers, and the price of their materi- 
als has risen so much because of the war 
requirements of the munitions industry 
that many park managers are of .the 
opinion that fireworks will not meet the 
requirements this season, and they are 
hesitating about using such displays. 

LAMB COMPLETES "TEASERS" . 

Arthur J. Lamb, the former song writer. 
has completed a new comic opera, entitled 
"The Teasers," which will start ont at 
Detroit soon, with Marvel Kessels and 
Charles Wayne as co-stars. John F. Ind- 
ian!, who for a brief period conducted a 
high-class music publishing concern, is 
slated as business manager. Jules Cbau- 
venet, who collaborated with Lamb on 
the show which marked the unfortunate 
opening of Coven t Garden last year, again 
appears as co-author. 

FINED ON GIRLS' COMPLAINT 

Augustus Rapp, a musician, was fined 
$200 in Judge Uhlir's Court, on complaint 
of two young girls, who testified that he 
had advertised for "a young lady of small 
and medium .build" to travel with him as 
his assistant in a musical act. . Each girl 
declared Rapp wanted to pay her $5 on 
condition that she'd travel as his wife. 



VICTORIA RAISES PRICES 

The Victoria Theatre raised its prices 
Monday, and will hereafter play five 
vaudeville acts instead of six but offering 
a better class of shows. The new scale 
is 10, 20 and 30, just as at the Wilson 
Avenue, the Association house on that side 
of the city. 

LE ROY WITH HALTON POWELL 
Charles LeRoy, who was producer at the 
National Theater, Detroit, Mich., for two 
years came to Chicago the other day 
headed for San Francisco; Cal., but Hal- 
ton Powell induced him to go to Indian- 
apolis for him. 

JANET ALLYN FOR SOUTH 

Janet Allyn and company 'have been 
booked for the Loew Southern time by 
Lee Kraus, the Chicago agent. 



'CM I CM GO 



FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Rudolph 5423 



COLUMBIA WILL CONTINUE 

The Columbia Theatre, just opposite the 
Windsor, on the north side, will continue 
to run, now that the" Rata have withdrawn 
from their strike, but not* as a White 
Rata theatre. Manager Fred Weiner has 
decided to incorporate a mixed policy of 
vaudeville and pictures for Sundays only. 
At first it was planned to show pictures 
during the week, with vaudeville as an 
added attraction for Sunday, but Weiner 
finally decided to keep the house dark 
daring tie week and provide shows for 
Sundays. 

AGENTS PLANNING VACATIONS 

Agents in the Majestic Theatre building 
are busy planning vacations. Many 
thought they would have to forego their 
annual rest on account of the strike com- 
plications, but now that things are again 
tranquil, all spots of interest, from At- 
lantic City to Palm Beach, are coming 
in for their share of consideration on the 
part of the busy agents. 



NO CUSS WORDS AT WILSON 

Acts which depend upon words like 
"hell" and damn" for -their comedy and 
tragedy are not welcome at the Wilson 
Avenue Theatre. A new sign, prominently 
displayed bade stage, announces that 
"Everything of a vulgar, suggestive, pro- 
fane or sacrilegious nature is forbidden." 
Immediate cancellation is the penalty for 
violation. 



WHITE CITY HAS FREE SHOW 

White City's big free attraction this 
summer will be "The Garden Follies," a 
musical melange, gorgeously costumed 
and splendidly staged. For this show, 
which .will be given in the Terrace Gar- 
den, Elsie Cole- has been -secured as prima 
donna for the second season. White City 
opens Saturday, May 19. 

■ — 

MRS. HARTS MOTHER DEAD 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hart returned 
to Chicago a short time ago, after "My 
Mother's Rosary" closed, and found Mrs. 
R. L. Rainbow, mother of Mrs. Hart, on 
her deathbed. Mrs. Rainbow died April 
14 and was buried the following Tuesday, 
at Defiance, O. 



TRANSFER "VERY GOOD EDDIE" 

"Very Good Eddie" has been trans- 
ferred to the Garrick Theatre, succeeding 
the Anna Held show. 



TRUEX AND SHAW SIGNED 
Ernest Truer and Oscar Shaw, appear- 
ing in "Very Good Eddie," were signed 
up recently by F. Ray Comstock, just 
before the producer left Chicago, to appear 
at the Princess Theatre, New York, in 
a new musical comedy. 

TONY PIRRI HAS PARALYSIS 

Tony Pirri, a performer who- recently 
took, up the selling of theatrical news- 
papers as a means of malting a livelihood, 
was stricken with facial paralysis last 
week. He is now on the road to re- 
covery- • >> 

CARRELL ADDING TO CIRCUIT 

C. L. Carrell, the .Chicago vaudeville 
agent, is gradually extending his circuit 
through Indiana. A house in Bedford 
was added to his list . this week and the 
Lyric, Fort Wayne, joined Sunday. 

FAVERSHAM COMING HERE 

As soon as Chicago shows signs of 
wearying of "Pierrot, the Prodigal," at 
the Princess, William Faversham will be 
hurried to that theatre with Shaw's "Get- 
ting Married." 

PERFORMERS CHANGE NAMES 

Davis and Kitty, now playing in the 
mid- West, were formerly known as Klein 
and Erlanger. They have been playing 
for the W. V. M. A. for two .years past. 

JACK BLOCK WITH DU VRIES 
Jack Block has accepted a position in 
the office of Sam DuVries, the Chicago 
agent. 



VAUDEVILLE IS 

WORRIED OVER 

CABARET 

HOTEL TO STAGE $60,000 SHOW 



How the opening of the "Iceland Frol- 
ics" in the Terrace Garden of the Hotel 
Morrison, in the early part of May, is 
going to affect Chicago vaudeville is caus- 
ing considerable speculation and concern 
in theatrical Chicago, for the show will 
probably be the most elaborate cabaret 
production ever staged, costing in the 
neighborhood of $60,000. The roster of 
its cast contains the names of many high- 
priced musical comedy stars, and nothing 
is being left undone to surround them 
with the best of scenery and costumes 
that money can buy. 

Just how much the opening of the "Ice- 
land Frolics" will effect Chicago theatres 
cannot, of course, be estimated, but it is 
believed that the production will attract 
a good quota of the vaudeville-going pub- 
lic that would like to see a high class 
musical comedy while they wine and dine. 

Charlotte and her Ice Ballet from the 
Hippodrome, New York, have been en- 
gaged for the "Iceland Frolics." Kosloff, 
of the Ice Palace, and the Dancing Mc- 
Leans will also be featured. Among the 
other principals will be: Violet Hayes, 
late of Daly's Theatre, London; Cecilia 
Novassi, late of "The Only Girl" and 
"Princess Pat" companies; Vincent Sulli- 
van, formerly with Christie McDonald; 
Mitzi Hajos, Harry Meyer, William Clif- 
ton, late of "The Lilac Domino" com- 
pany, and several others. They will be 
supported by a. chorus of twenty-four 
girls and an orchestra of twenty. 

The book was written by Harry Paul- 
ton, the lyrics and music by William J. 
Hains, Harry I. Robinson and others. 

The production will be divided into 
four parts, representing the four seasons 
of the year. 

The Terrace Garden is a sub-cellar of 
the Hotel Morrison, and is built like a 
stadium, the stage being circular with the 
ice rink in front. When the rink is not 
in use it will be covered for the big en- 
semble numbers and for dancing. 

BOMB AT FUCH'S THEATRE 

Bomb-throwing became an' added fea- 
ture of the Waiters' strike at Bismarck 
Garden last week. A bomb exploded in 
the basement of Fuch's theatre just be- 
for a scheduled meetings of the striking 
waiters. The damage was not sufficient 
to interfere with the meeting. The wait- 
. ers get $1 per day. They are striking 
for $10 per week, with one day off in 
seven and for recognition of their union. . 

SOLDIERS SEE SHOWS 

Boys in uniform have been among the 
most enthusiastic theatre audiences with- 
in the last few weeks. But this has not 
aided the financial side of the show busi- 
ness any, because most of our fighters 
have gained entree via the free list. 

GEORGE LITTLE BACK 

George A. Little, writer of "Hawaiian 
Butterfly," returned from his New York 
trip recently, and will make his head- 
quarters with Feist's Chicago office. 

DIVORCE GRANTED TO ACTRESS 

Genevieve Forster was last week grant- 
ed a divorce from Jesse Forster. The For- 
eters were well known on the vaudeville 
stage in the Middle West. 

MORRIS GETS DIVORCE 

Johnnie Morris has been granted a di- 
vorce in the local courts from Maudie 
Clark. Morris was represented by Leon 
A. Berezniak. 



SEEKING NEW QUARTERS 

Many Chicago branches of Eastern pub- 
lishing concerns are seeking new head- 
quarters. There will be a grand exit 
from the Randolph Building May 1. Many 
of the publishers formerly located in that 
building will move into Cohan's Grand. 
Others have decided to give up their Chi- 
cago offices temporarily. 

McKINLEY ILL 

William McKinley, head of the music 
publishing concern bearing his name, who 
recently returned from a brief vacation 
taken for his health's sake, has not yet 
completely recovered. He is suffering 
from a peculiar form of nervous trouble. 

ROSSITER BECOMES CITIZEN 

Will Rossiter, the Chicago publisher, 
who has been in business in Chicago for 
thirty-five years, became a citizen of the 
United States last week, when he took 
out his second naturalization papers. He 
was born in England in 1867. 

LAEMLE SELLING CURTAIN ADS 

William Laemle, who waa interested in 
one of the "September Morn" road com- 
panies, is now in the employ of the Al- 
lardt Advertising System, and is working 
in Michigan, selling ads on theatre -. cur- 
tains. 



S. W. CIRCUIT CLOSES IN MAY 

Charles E. Hodkins will book the last 
show of the season for the Southwest cir- 
cuit to close at the Hippodrome in Jop- 
lin, Mo„ May 16, and to close the various 
houses of the circuit in rotation. 



STAGE ASPIRANTS SENT HOME 

Peggy Tracy, a Philadelphia girl, and 
a chum from Kalamazoo, who had run 
away from home to become actresses, 
were taken from the Saratoga Hotel last 
Thursday and sent home. 

ACCEPT KETTERING PLAY 

Rowland and Howard are planning the 
production of "A Daughter of the Sun." 
a Hawaiian play from the pen of Ralph 
Kettering, for the International Circuit. 



QUINTET WORKS CAFETERIA 

The Hawaiian Quintet, with "The Bird 
of Paradise" company, gave special con- 
certs at Thompson's Madison Street Cafe- 
teria last Friday and Saturday. 

WINNIPEG MANAGER HERE 

E. F. Seamans, manager of the Strand 
Theatre at Winnipeg, Can., is in Chi- 
cago for a well-earned vacation. He wilt 
remain for a week or ten days. 

TRIO AT CABARET 

Fields, Salsberry and Davis, who ap- 
peared, at the Majestic Theatre recently, 
are now featured in the cabaret enter- 
tainment at Wyn Cliff Inn. 

CARTOONIST IN ACT , 
Frank M. Kelly, formerly a cartoonist 
on the Morning Telegraph, New York, ap- 
peared in a comedy act called "Tom and 
Jerry" at McVicker's last week. 

REHMS TO JOIN CABARET 

Bobby Renins, who left the cast of 
"Miss America" last week, departed for 
Philadelphia to join the Ziegler House 

cabaret. • 



BURLESQUE IS PATRIOTIC 

Burlesque shows visiting Chicago within 
recent weeks have been busy interpolat- 
ing military numbers. 

TRIXIE JOINS DUNBAR ACT 
Trixie Oliver went to Columbus Thurs- 
day to join one of Dunbar's acta. 

KAHN LEAVES TOWN 

Gus Kahn left Chicago last week on a 
combination business and pleasure trip. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 25, 1917 





U. S. FLAG BARRED 

FROM TITLE PAGES 



Nearly All State* Have Laws Forbidding 

Its Use and GoTemment la on the 

Lookout for Offenders 

Music publishers, who ill these times 
of patriotic fervor are contemplating the 
issuing of war and other songs of na- 
tional appeal, with title pages upon which 
U displayed the flag or colors will do 
well to examine the statutes of the vari- 
ous States in regard to displays of this 
n atur e. 

While the fact that it is illegal to 
print the colors of the United States or 
the nag upon any article of merchandise 
to be displayed or sold within the District 
of Columbia, is comparatively well known, 
it is not a matter of general knowledge 
that almost all the States of the Union 
have upon the statute books stringent 
laws regarding this. These laws during 
the time of .peace are scarcely ever en- 
forced, bat with the declaration of war 
any act which might be construed as com- 
mercializing the flag receives immediate 
governmental attention. 

The law of the State of New York 
in regard to the subject is particularly 
clear, and is as follows: 

"Sub-division 16 of section 1425 of the 
penal law of the State of New York: 
'Any person who shall expose to public 
view, manufacture, sell, expose for sale, 
give away, or have in possession for sale, 
or to give away, or for use for any pur- 
pose, any article or substance, being an 
article or merchandise, or article or thing 
for carrying or transporting merchandise 
upon which, after the first day of Septem- 
ber, nineteen hundred and five, shall have 
been printed, painted or otherwise placed, 
a representation of any such flag (mean- 
ing among others, the flag of the United 
States of America), standard, color, or 
tnsign. to advertise, call attention to, 
decorate, mark or distinguish the article 
or substance on which bo placed, shall 
be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and 
shall be punished by a fine of not ex- 
ceeding one hundred dollars, or by pun- 
ishment for not more than thirty days, 
or both in the discretion of the court, and 
shall also forfeit a penalty of fifty dol- 
lars for each such offense, and such action 
or suit may be brought by or in the name 
of any citizen of this State." 

"TRAIL" CAPTURES NEW YORK 

That wonderful international sons of the 
trenches, "There's a Long, Long Trail," 
chalked up a new record for itself last 
week, where it was the bright, outstanding 
singing feature in no less than eight of the 
principal vaudeville theatres in Greater 
New York. In every single instance It 
was sung splendidly and greeted with the 
most genuine enthusiasm, so much so that 
if every act on every bill had sung it the 
audiences apparently wouldn't have minded 
it a bit The acta and the houses where 
they appeared and thus did themselves and 
the song this honor were Carlisle & Homer 
at the Alhambra ; D*Avigneau*s Chinese 
Imperial T>uo at the Colonial: Sol Levoy 
at the Harlem Opera House: Tom Ed- 
wards and Alice Melville at trie Royal; 
Cardo & Noll at Keeney's Theatre, Brook- 
lyn; Emmett Welch's Minstrels at the 
Prospect : Reynolds ft White at the Fifth 
Avenue Theatre will play it beautifully on 
the violin; Three Singing Types at the 
Palace, Brooklyn: and Frank Mullane at 
Proctor's. Cardo ft Noll also repeated 
their performance at Keeney's Theatre. 
Newark. M. Witmark ft Sons, the pub- 
lishers of "There's a Long, Long Trail," 
are being innndated with requests for this 
altogether remarkable song. 



LEO JACOBS WITH MILLEGRAM 
Leo Jacobs, formerly with T. B. Harms. 
is now the professional manager of the 
Carl MiTlegrani Publishing Company, Inc. 



WITMARK HITS AT THE CIRCUS 

Throngs at the Barnum and Bailey Cir- 
cus in Madison Square Garden are de- 
lighted to be daily entertained by the 
constant playing of the chorus of popular 
songs of the day, and chief among these 
figure prominently five of the biggest hits 
published by M. Witmark ft Sons. Mr. 
King, leader of the big band there, played 
frequently such numbers as these: "When 
If s Circus Day Back Home," "Snki San," 
"I've Got the Sweetest Girl in Maryland," 
"I'm Going Back to California" and the 
biggest of all big favorites, "There's a 
Long, Long Trail." A straw shows which 
way the wind blows, and a circus band just 
where the hits come from. 



RAYMOND HUBBELL 

ASKS INJUNCTION 



STERN'S STATE SONG 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. have a highly suc- 
cessful number in "Somewhere In Dela- 
ware," the novelty "State" song by Will J. 
Harris and Harry L Robinson, who wrote 
"Good Morning Glory," another delightful 
little number, also published by Stern. 
"Delaware" has a peculiar appeal of its 
own that makes it invaluable to every sing- 
ing act and Mr. Harris has provided a 
donble version that is worth going miles to 
hear. 



BROADWAY'S PATRIOTIC SONG 

One of the best of the many patriotic 
songs that have been put out this sea- 
son is the new Broadway Music Corpora- 
tion's number "What Kind of An Ameri- 
can Are You?" This song, stirring in 
sentiment and beautiful in melody, is cre- 
ating a furore in vaudeville circles. 

Many of the best known singing acts 
are featuring it, and all report that it is 
an unfailing encore winner. 



FEATURES VON TILZER HIT 

Caroline Caution, a new prima donna 
with a phenomenal voice, ranging from 
<kep bass notes to a high soprano, wfU be 
heard in New York during the coming 
week. 

Among the new songs which she will in- 
troduce is the new Von Tilzer hit "The 
Man Behind the Hammer and the Plow." 



FEIST SONG IN SEATTLE 

Monte Austin, the star singer of the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, is now in 
Seattle, where at tbe many patriotic 
meetings which are being held almost 
nightly he is featuring the Feist patriotic 
song "If I Had a Son for Bach Star in 
Old Glory. Uncle Sam, I'd Give Them All 
to Yon." 



BROADWAY'S FEATURE SONGS 

The Broadway Music Corporation's fea- 
ture songs for the season are "When the 
Sun Goes Down in Dixie," Honolulu 
Ilicki Boola," "Honor Thy Father and' 
Mother." "I Wasn't Born to Be Lone- 
some." "Eve Wasn't Modest." and "The 
Cute Little Wigglin' Dance." 



MORSE SONG WITH MINSTRELS 

The Record Makers* Minstrels, a troupe 
made up of the prominent phonograph 
singers and comedians is making its an- 
nual spring tour through the south. Teddy 
Morse, the musical director of the com- 
pany, is getting a lot of publicity for his 
new song "Sing Me Love's Lullaby." 



PUBLISHERS MUST MOVE 

Kalmar, Puck ft Abrams will on May 
1 be forced to vacate their offices at 
Broadway and Forty-seventh Street, 
owing to" the fact that the entire building, 
of which they occupy one floor, has been 
leased, to the Testaurant which occupies 
the ground floor. 



TIERNEY & BRYAN COLLABORATING 

Harry Tierney. who wrote the big suc- 
cess "Mississippi" for William Jerome, is 
writing a number of new Bongs with 
Alfred J. Brran. 



As Member of Authors' Society He 

Brings Actions Against Theatre and 

Restaurant Proprietor 

Raymond Hubbell, a member of the So- 
ciety of Authors, Composers and Pub- 
lishers has instituted a suit at law, 
through his attorney, Nathan Burkan, in 
the United States District Court to re- 
strain the Royal Pastime Amusement Co., 
who. operate the Begun Theatre, in West 
One Hundred and Sixteenth Street, from 
using for public performance his compo- 
sitions "Poor Butterfly" and "Hello, I'm 
Looking for You." 

The motion for a temporary injunction 
before trial will be argued before Judge 
Julius Mayer on Friday morning. 

Last Friday morning Judge Mayer in 
the District Court granted an injunction 
before trial in a suit similar to the above 
one instituted by Hubbell against Gene 
Sennett, who operates a cabaret in the 
Bronx. 

In this action Hubbell alleges that Sen- 
nett was using for public performances 
'Poor Butterfly." This decision of Judge 
Mayer's will prohibit Sennett prior to 
trial' from using any of the compositions 
belonging to members of the Society of 
Authors, Composers and Publishers. 

MARSHALL SUES FOR $50,000 

Henry I. Marshall, the song writer, has 
commenced an action for $50,000 damages 
against the Metropolitan Street Ry. for 
injuries received early last November. 

He was thrown from a 34th Street car 
and his foot so badly crushed that he was 
obliged to cancel his vaudeville tour and 
can only walk with the aid of a cane. The 
accident, he claims, was due to the 
negligence of 'a green conductor. 

NEW SLOANE MUSICAL PLAY 

A. Baldwin Sloane, who has done little 
in the line of musical composition re- 
cently, has just completed the score of a 
new musical comedy entitled "Dew Drop 
Inn." which will be produced this summer 
in Chicago. Book and lyrics of the piece 
are by Jack Hazzard and Percival Knight. 



JEROME GETS SONG HIT 

William Jerome has secured from Daly 
ft Cool the publication rights of the new 
song hit "Cotton Picldn' Time in Alabam." 
The new number is one of the biggest 
sellers of the month among the roll manu- 
facturers. 



SUNSHINE SONG AT CENTURY 

"Take Me to the Laud of Sunshine," 
one of Chas. K. Harris* new numbers, 
has been introduced in the spring edition 
of "The Century Girl" by Van and 
Schcnck. who clean up with the song. 



FRED WATSON WITH JEROME 

Fred. Watson, the pianist and "arranger, 
who for the past four years has been con- 
nected with the Charles K. Harris house, 
is now with the William Jerome Co. 



NEW McKINLEY OFFICES 

The new professional rooms of the Mc- 
Kinley Music Co. in the Exchange Building 
are nearly ready, and scores of singers are 
visiting them daily. 

ABE OLMAN IN PITTSBURGH 

Abe Olman has been spending the week 
in Pittsburgh with the new Winter Garden 
production in which one of his songs is 
featured. 



MUSICAL PLAY FOR THE DOLLYS 

P. G. Wodehouse. Guy Bolton and Jean 
Schwartz are writing a musical farce in 
which the Dolly sisters win be Btarred next 
season. 



THE ENTERPRISE CONTEST 

The Enterprise Music Supply Co. have 
announced a prize contest of $100 in gold, 
to be divided into four prizes of $25, $15, 
$10 and $5, to be awarded to the ones who 
can name the ten biggest popular music 
sellers, either songs or instrumental, for 
the past five years, each year to begin with 
January 1 and end December 31. 

Any one connected with a music depart- 
ment can operate. No fee or entry blank 
is necessary and all selections should be 
mailed to the Enterprise Co. at No. 145 
West 46th Street, New York. 



SANTLEY AND NORTON FLOP 

Santley and Norton, two former song 
pluggers. who have been having things 
pretty much all their own way in the local 
big time vaudeville houses, did a sorry 
"flop," when they presented their act at the 
Palais Royal, Broadway* new cabaret last 
week. 

They may derive some comfort, how- 
ever, from the fact that several other big 
time acts met with the. same chilly recep- 
tion which the diners accorded them. 



RECORD ROYALTY STATEMENT 

John L. Golden and Raymond Hubbell, 
writers of "Poor Butterfly" have received 
their royalty statement for the sale of the 
song for the three months ending April 1. 
It represents an amount slightly in excess 
of $25,000, and establishes a record for 
such a period of time. "Poor Butterfly," 
the sensation of the music publishing world, 
will, according to music men, be very apt 
to reach the million mark before the fall 
season arrives. 



HARRY VON TILZER'S NOVELTY 

With the President's proclamation as 
an inspiration, Harry Von Tilzer has 
written a novelty number which, although 
less than a week old, is being featured by 
scores of singers and is scoring a decided 
hit. 

The new song is called "The Man Be- 
hind the Hammer and the Plow," and is 
without doubt one of Mr. Von Tilzer's 
best compositions. 



A CLEVER IRISH SONG 

One of the most beautiful little songs 
ever engendered by the thoughts of Ireland 
is the new song by L. Wolfe Gilbert and 
Anatol Fricdland entitled "I'm Hearin' 
from Erin" which is described as being a 
"Musical message from over the sea," and 
surely it carries in both words and melody 
the very spirit of the "onld sod" at its 
best. It is a Jos. W. Stem number. 



NEW TRIANGLE OFFICES 

The Triangle Music Publishing Company 
of- New Orleans has opened professional 
offices in tbe Strand Theatre Building. 
Samuel L. Rosenbaum, general manager 
of the company, is in charge. 

BERLIN IN VAUDEVILLE 

Irving Berlin, assisted by a U. S. Navy 
gun crew, is appearing in the Fox the- 
atres singing patriotic songs and assist- 
ing in the recruiting of men for the army 

and navy. 



VINCENT BRYAN ILL 

Vincent Bryan, the songwriter, who for 
the past year has been on the Pacific Coast 
writing motion picture scenarios, is very 
ill in Los Angeles. 



EDGAR F. BITNER IN THE WEST 

Edgar F. Bitner, of the Leo Feist house, 
is on. a business trip throughout tbe Middle 
West. He will be away a week or ten 
days. 

PRESCOTT ON WESTERN TRIP 

Harry Prescott, road man for the Harry 
Yon Tilzer Music Co., left on Monday for 
a six weeks' western trip. 



April 25, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




MERRY ROUNDER 

GIRL WINS 

RECRUITS 

AIDS Oi GETTING MEN FOR NAVY 



Albany, N. Y., April 17. — 'The Merry 
Bounders,** playing this week at the Em- 
pire Theatre here, lent their aid in getting 
recruits for the U. S. Navy by an' unusual 
grant. The company assembled at the 
theatre yesterday morning and, headed by 
Eileen Sheriden, and preceded by the St. 
Francis Orphan Asylum Drum and Fife 
Corps, marched to the recruiting bead- 
quarters, where they escorted recruits to 
the New York Central railway station. 

The company then marched to the cor- 
ner of State and Pearl street s, where, 
after two others had spoken, Miss Sheriden 
addressed the gathering, urging the young 
men to join the Navy and do their bit. 

Immediately after the meeting quite a 
number of men, impressed by Miss Sheri- 
den's speech, went to the recruiting station 
and volunteered. The effort was so suc- 
cessful that Ensign Hambsch, in charge of 
the recruiting station, requested that it 
be repeated during the week. 

On Thursday, April 1ft, the day set 
aside for a state-wide recruiting campaign, 
Miss Sheriden addressed gatherings, and, 
as a special Inducement for men to enlist, 
rewarded every recruit with a kiss. 

STOCK FOR STAR, CLEVELAND 

Cleveland, Ohio, April 21. — Drew & 
Campbell's "Liberty Girls," following the 
regular season, will play back to the Star 
Theatre, Cleveland, where tbey will play 
the week of May 28, and after that week, 
following the policy of the last two seasons, 
the Star Theatre will play stock burlesque, 
alternating with a stock burlesque com- 
pany from the Cadillac Theatre, Detroit. 

The principals now with the Liberty 
Girls, will not play during the stock sea- 
son. Jack Conway, who, during the past 

season, bas established hiin«*»lf as one of 
the best Irish comedians in burlesque, will 
return to his home in Melrose, Massachu- 
setts. Etta Joerns and Barry Melton ex- 
pect to summer at a cottage in Long 
Island. Arthur Mayer, ' the German 
comlque, expects to take unto himself a 
wife and will honeymoon during the months 
of July, and August. 

For the summer season Messrs. Drew 
and Campbell will engage an entirely new 
cast of principals. 

Plans have already been laid for an 
entirely new Liberty Girls production next 
season. J. Mitchell is writing a brand new 
book. The Servas Studios is preparing a 
new set of scenery and costumes are being 
made by the Orange Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

The last season has been the biggest in 
the burlesque history of the old Star 
Theatre. 



BURLESQUERS BEAT ALAMOS 

The boys of the Hurtig and Semon's 
Theatre played a return game with the 
boys of the Alamo Cabaret and beat them 
to the tune of 7 to 3 last week. The feat- 
ure of the game was the batting of Geo. 
Beid and the pitching of Hook Lenin for 
the winners. Joe Levey stole second base 
with the bags full. Some play. Next Sun- 
day morning the burlesque boys will play 
the team from the College Inn. 



GRANET ARRANGES BENEFIT 
Newabk, N. J., April 23. — Sam Granet, 
assistant treasurer of Miner's Empire, is 
arranging his annual testimonial to occur 
May 24. He has engaged Sliding Billy 
Watson and Ed Lee Wrothe and Company 
for the occasion. 



WATSON AND WROTHE SPLIT 

Ed Leewrothe will close with the Wat- 
son-Wrothe show at Utica, N. Y., and 
the Watson show will continue for three 
supplementary weeks with a new book 
and Watson working all through the 
show. 

The Gaiety, Montreal; the Empire, 
Brooklyn; the Empire, Newark, and Hur- 
tig &. Seamon's, New York, will be played 
in the order named. Several other 
changes in principals will also be made 
after the Montreal date. 



FLOSSIE MeCLOUD BANQUETED 

Springfield, Mass., April 23. — Over one 
hundred members of the C. E. Club of 
Springfield sat down to a dinner given in 
honor of Miss Flossie McCloud, . leading 
woman of "The Lady Buccaneers," at the 
Hotel G-ilmore last week. The whole affair 
took on a patriotic air, all present wearing 
some emblem of the good old Stars and 
Stripes. Miss McCloud, with the ladies of 
the company gave a flag drill and they 
closed with the singing of the "Star 
Spangled Banner." 



COLLECT $382 FOR FUND 
Chicago, April 21. — Young lady mem- 
bers of the Thoroughbreds Co., playing this 
week at the Gaiety Theatre, collected 
$382.99 for the Actors' Fund from the 
audience. A prize was given to the one 
collecting the highest amount - The col- 
lectors were: Zene Vann, $75.19; Fanny 
Washington, $65.15; Louise Marshall, 
$60.55; Perle Briggs, $55.40; Annie 
Parker, $45.60; Millie Love ridge, $42.80, 
and Louise Devlin, $38.30. 



ACTS AID BENEFIT 

Twenty-two acts have volunteered their 
services for the benefit to be tendered 
Frank Howie, Dair Schneider and P. J. 
O'Hara, of Miner's, in the Bronx, on May 
6. An illustrated souvenir journal of the 
occasion will be unique, as the musicians, 
the ushers and the house staff all have 
taken space in it. 



BURLESQUERS AID FUND 

Akron, O., April 23.— The "Girls from 
Joyland" burlesque company that played 
the Grand Theatre here April 12-14 sent 
their girls into the audience and took up a 
collection for the Actors' Home. This is 
one of the first companies that have done 
this here. The "Tango Queens" closed here 
Saturday night. 



GEORGE MINER HONORED 

Manager George Miner has been ap- 
pointed assistant commissioner of the U. 
S. Boy Scouts and will give sixty of the 
specially drilled boys a chance to give ex- 
hibitions on his stage during the "Follies" 
week. Part of the receipts will go to the 
ambulance corps of the division. 



BARNEY GERARD CANCELS WEST 

The dates of the "Follies of the Day" 
at Des Moines, Iowa, 'and Omaha, Neb., 
have been cancelled and Barney Gerard 
will bring in the show, from Chicago, to 
fill a week at the Bronx, New York, April 
30-May 5. Mr. Gerard is booking for bis 
three shows for next season. 



MINER'S ATHLETIC CARNIVAL 

Owing to the "Million Dollar Dolls" and 
"Bon Tons" cancelling Miner's, in the 
Bronx, dates. Manager George Miner will 
play the "Follies of the Day" week of 
April SO, and for the following week has 
booked a big wrestling carnival. 



CABARET STAR FOR BURLESQUE 

Newabk. April 23. — Hazel Young has 
been signed by a prominent A. B. O. show 
as pVima donna. Miss Young is now 
singing in a cabaret here. She will do a 
musical specialty with the show assisted 
by Clifford Rosse, nut comedian. 



PEARSON GETS 

2nd COLUMBIA 

FRANCHISE 

PREPARING BIG PRODUCTION 



i Burlesque Notes 



Arthur Pearson, one of the youngest 
producers on the Columbia Burlesque Cir- 
cuit, will operate two shows upon that 
wheel next season. Last week Pearson 
negotiated for the use of a franchise 
which is in operation this season for his 
own use next fall. At present he is oper- 
ating "The Step Lively Girls" over the 
Columbia Wheel. 

Pearson is determined to have the new 
show surpass his present offering in every 
detail. He is negotiating with Flo Zieg- 
feld for the purchase of the scenery and 
costumes of the "1916 Follies" for use in 
both of his shows. 

No title has been selected for the new 
show, nor have any of the members of 
the cast been engaged as yet. According 
to Pearson, the show will carry twenty- 
four chorus girls, six. chorus men and 
eight principals. 

Arrangements will be closed this week 
with a well-known musical comedy writer 
for the book and lyrics of the production. 

Pearson " declares that this show will he 
closer to a musical comedy than any bur- 
lesque show has ever been in the past. 

This season was Pearson's first as a 
producer on the Columbia Circuit, as 
prior to that time he had been a manager 
and agent and producer of vaudeville 
acts. 



WATSON- WROTHE TEAM LOSE 
Buffalo, N. Y„ April 23. — The Garden 
Theatre Stock Company's baseball team 
defeated the Watson and Wrothe nine by 
a score of 8 to 7 before a large crowd of 
theatrical folk here. The lineup was as 
follows : 

WATBON WHOTHE. GABDEN STOCK. 

Martin — P. Slayer — p. 

Boeber — C. Ernlooa — 2d B. 

De Sllva— 1st B. J. Wilton— C. 

Ed 1** Wrothe — 2d B. Bookman — 3d B. 

Johnson — 3d B. Kerner — 8.8. 

BUly Watson — 8.8. Lew Golden — 1st B. 

Daly — L.P. Boy Peck— LP. 

Gibson — OF. Fay — C.F. 

Gardner — B.F. Joe Dolan — B.F. 



BURLESQUERS AID RECRUITING 

Albany, April 21. — Daring the engage- 
ment of the "Merry Bounders" here Eileen 
Sheridan, the leading woman, was in com- 
mand of the girls who secured a number 
of volunteers and escorted them to the sta- 
tion on their way to New York. Miss 
Sheridan also delivered a patriotic address 
at Pearl and State Streets. The girls, led 
by Miss Sheridan, also secured recruits 
during their engagements in Canadian 
cities. 



EXTRA TIME AT THE GAIETY 
"The DarlingB of Paris," "The Tempt- 
ers," "GirlB from the Follies," "Record 

Breakers," "Americans" and "Girls from 
Joyland" will play post-season dates at 
the Gaiety, Brooklyn, commencing this 
week, in the order named. 



PRINCIPALS HELD OVER 

Etta Joerns, Barry Melton, Arthur 
Mayer, and Jack Conway have signed with 
the "Liberty Girls" for another season. 

EDWARDS. WITH "MAIDENS" CO. 

Charles Edwards is now in advance at 
the "Midnight Maidens." after closing with 
"Hans and Fritz" at Augusta, Ga. 

VAUDEVILLE GETS BURLESQUERS 

Julia Clifford and Ed Swartz of The 
Globe Trotters" will open in vaudeville 
next month. 



Frank E. Freeman, of the Star and 
Garter show, visited the home office and 
studios of I. M. Weingarden, in Chicago, 
last week, and predicts most elaborate pro- 
ductions next season for the "Star and 
Garter" and "September Morning 
Glories." 



The final road engagement of the "Hip, 
Hip Hoorah" show will be played at the 
Casino, Philadelphia, week of May 7. 
After laying off May 1410 the Columbia, 
New York, summer run will splash in on 
May 21. 

Harry Montague will join "Watson's 
Beef Trust" next season to play character 
parts, and will also furnish the book. 

Emma Conroy, with Drew & Camp- 
bell's "Liberty Girls," dosed' at Hurtig 
and Seamon's on account of illness. 



Murray Simons is ill at the Jackson 
Hotel, Chicago, having been forced to 
leave "The Thoroughbreds." 

Harry Seyon, -of the Darlings of Paris 
Company is fixed for next season with 
Spiegel's "Social Follies." 

Ethel Dunlevy closed with the' Bon- 
Tons at Hartford, owing to the illness of 
her mother. 

Strouse A Franklin have re-engaged 
Fred C. Haekett for next season with the 
"Lady Buccaneers." 

The Record Breakers will extend their 
season to May 26, closing at the Star, 
Brooklyn. 

Ora Ental will be a feature with the 
Gayety, Philadelphia Stock for the open- 
ing week. 



Raymond Paine has been booked as 
comedian for the "Step Lively Girls" next 
season. 



Mildred Irving, formerly with Ben 
Welch, joined the Sam Sidman show, 
April 17. 



Jules Jacobs, German comedian with 
Watson's Beef Trust, has published a war 
song. 



Hazel Weiss and Alma Hendrix closed 
with Sam Sidman at Hnrtig and Seamon's. 

Russell Hill and Dolly Sweet will open 
at the Trocadero, Philadelphia, April SO. 

Bob Ferns will do blackface for another 
season with the "Million Dollar Dolls." 



Harry Mandel is signed up for next 
season with Jacobs and Jermon. 

Henry P. Nelson dosed bis season at 
Niagara Falls, N. Y., last week. 

Mon& Raymond will be featured in the 
Haymarket Stock, Chicago. 

Flo Davis has signed for another sea- 
eon with J. E. Cooper. 

Ed Griffin has re-eigned for next season 
with Drew & Campbell 



Ed Griffin will be with the Liberty Girls 
again next season. 

Bert Baker has signed Id